Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

No image found.

China-Europe Relations

Europe and China were undoubtedly the most important third actors in the Cold War system. As territorial entities and political and economic actors located at the crossroads of the mutual spheres of action of the two superpowers, they played a key role in the evolution and reshaping of the bipolar system. This collection charts China's relations with Europe, and as it moved from East to West throughout the course of the Cold War.

  • December 02, 1961

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Poland, 'Opinions on the Ninth Congress of the Polish Party'

    The Chinese Embassy in Poland reports that "Gomułka will absolutely continue to follow Khrushchev in opposing China and Albania."

  • May 31, 1962

    Summary of Ambassador Wang Binnan’s Report to the Department Party Committee

    Wang Bingnan reports extensively on social, political, religious, and economic conditions within Poland, as well as Poland's foreign relalations with the US, the Soviet Union, and China.

  • April 04, 1963

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Germany, 'The Opinion of the Former First-Secretary of the German Embassy in China on Sino-German Differences'

    Chinese and German diplomats discuss East German policies toward the Sino-Soviet split, criticisms of Stalin, and the situation in Yugoslavia.

  • April 27, 1963

    Cable from the Foreign Ministry, 'Questions regarding the German Diplomat wanting to Establish Friendly Relations with China'

    The Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs reports that East Germany, which "has served as Khrushchev’s anti-Chinese vanguard," is interested in improving relations with Beijing.

  • April 30, 1963

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Czechoslovakia, 'Several Noteworthy Signs in Czechoslovakia'

    Zhong Xidong believes that "Czechoslovakia’s situation is in the midst of changes."

  • September 09, 1963

    Telegram number 638/45 from André Saint Mleux

    Andre Saint Mleux summarizes a recent visit to China made by M. Scheyven.

  • November 02, 1963

    Summary of Ideas Expressed by the Prime Minister Zhou Enlai

    During Edgar Faure's visit to China, Zhou Enlai lays out China's demands for Sino-French normalization.

  • November 07, 1963

    Report Sent to General de Gaulle, President of the French Republic, by Edgar Faure, on his Mission to China

    Edgar Faure briefs Charles de Gaulle on his visit to China, his meetings with senior Chinese leaders, and the prospects for Sino-French normalization.

  • November 12, 1963

    Memorandum of Conversation, Chinese Officials and the Hungarian Ambassador to China

    Martin, the Hungarian ambassador to China, is involved with several conversations with Chinese officials before returning to Hungary, and the three highlighted conversations are with Zhu De, Chen Yi, and Zhou Enlai. Among other international issues, Zhu De discusses imperial attempts to restore capitalism in socialist countries and references “revisionism” in Hungary, to which Martin responds defensively. Chen Yi discusses Chinese industrial and economic development. Zhou Enlai discusses recent Chinese struggles, and interprets Martin’s reaction as distrust.

  • November 22, 1963

    Cable from the Foreign Ministry, 'Indicating the Spirit of Ambassadors’ Talks with the Romanian Side'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry lays out China's policies toward Romania in the context of the Sino-Soviet split.

  • November 27, 1963

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Germany, 'Brief of a Conversation with the Polish Ambassador'

    Feliks Baranowski and Wang Guoquan discuss the Sino-Soviet split and China's relations with Poland.

  • November 29, 1963

    Telegram 869/871 from André Saint Mleux

    André Saint Mleux tracks recent Xinhua dispatches on the state of Franco-American relations.

  • 1964

    The Situation Surrounding the Establishment of Diplomatic Relations between China and France and Related Issues

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry reviews the process of the normalization of relations between China and France and speculates how the establishment of diplomatic relations between China and France might affect China's status in the United Nations and with the UK, Europe, Africa, and Japan.

  • January 11, 1964

    Telegram number 47 from Pierre Gorce

    Pierre Gorce summarizes the contents of the recent Sino-Albanian common declaration.

  • January 22, 1964

    Cable from the Foreign Ministry, 'Please Notify the Governments of the Receiving Countries of the Establishment of Diplomatic Relations between China and France'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry determines how to inform other countries of the establishment of diplomatic relations with France.

  • January 23, 1964

    Cable from Li Qingquan, 'Talks with Beaumarchais about the Issue of the Establishment of Diplomatic Relations between China and France'

    Li Qingquan and and Beaumarchais discuss the issue of "two China's" in the normalization of relations between China and France.

  • January 23, 1964

    Report, UN Department of Political and Security Council Affairs, 'French Recognition of the C.P.R. and Its Consequences for the United Nations'

    The Department of Political and Security Council Affairs outlines the diplomatic consequences of France's recognition of the People's Republic of China in 1964.

  • January 24, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Switzerland, 'Conversation Transcript of the Fourth Talk for the Establishment of Diplomatic Relations between China and France'

    Li Qingquan and Jacques de Beaumarchais discuss the process of normalizing relations between China and France.

  • January 26, 1964

    Cable from the Foreign Ministry, 'Forwarding the Central Committee Notice regarding Propaganda Points on Diplomatic Relations between China and France'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry offers instructions on how to discuss the normalization of relations between China and France.

  • March, 1964

    Transcript of Conversations between Delegations of the Central Committee of the Romanian Workers Party and the Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party (Excerpts)

    Romanian and Chinese officials on the Soviet use of informal channels to interfere in Romania’s domestic affairs.