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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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Bandung Conference, 1955

Leading representatives from twenty-nine newly independent African, Asian, and Middle Eastern countries came together for the Afro-Asian Conference in Bandung, Indonesia, from 19 April-24 April 1955. (Image: Delegates attending the Bandung Conference pose for a group photo, April 1955) (See also: The Second Asian-African Conference.)

  • June 22, 1954

    Cable from Zhou Enlai, 'Premier’s Intentions and Plans to Visit India'

    Zhou Enlai informed the Chinese government that his purposes of visiting India were to prepare the signing of an Asian peace and to build peace in the Indochina area. He also stated his plans regarding the negotiations of several treaties. The Chinese government agreed with his plans.

  • June 28, 1954

    Record of the First Meeting between Premier Zhou and Prime Minister U Nu

    Zhou Enlai and U Nu first talked about the decision made on the Geneva Conference regarding the armistice in the Korean Peninsula and the role of the US in it. Then they talked about the elements that complicated the Sino-Burmese relations and the need for building mutual trust and signing a non-political agreement. They also discussed the principles they would have in a joint statement before the signing of this potential agreement.

  • June 29, 1954

    Record of the Second Meeting between Premier Zhou and Prime Minister U Nu

    Zhou Enlai and U Nu first talked about the decision made on the Geneva Conference regarding the armistice in the Korean Peninsula and the role of the US in it. Then they talked about the elements that complicated the Sino-Burmese relations and the need for building mutual trust and signing a non-political agreement. They also discussed the principles they would have in a joint statement before the signing of this potential agreement.

  • September 04, 1954

    Chinese Foreign Ministry Intelligence Department Report on the Asian-African Conference

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry reported Indonesia’s intention to hold the Asian-African Conference, its attitude towards the Asian-African Conference, and the possible development of the Conference.

  • October 19, 1954

    Minutes of Chairman Mao Zedong’s First Meeting with Nehru

    Mao Zedong and Nehru discuss Sino-Indian relations, the political situation in Asia, and the role of the United States in world politics.

  • October 19, 1954

    Minutes of the First Meeting between Premier Zhou Enlai and Nehru

    Zhou Enlai and Nehru discuss French and Portuguese colonialism in India and China, the Sino-American conflict, conflict in the Taiwan Straits, and the China issue at the United Nations.

  • October 20, 1954

    Excerpt from Premier Zhou Enlai's Second Meeting with Nehru

    Zhou and Nehru ponder American foreign policy and whether the US wants "to create tension."

  • October 20, 1954

    Talking Points from Premier Zhou Enlai’s Second Meeting with Nehru

    Zhou and Nehru cover a large range of topics relating to China and India's international relations. The conversation begins by discussing the issue of Taiwan, in relation to China, then moves to the "adverse effects" of American involvement in the Afro-Asian region. The two then discuss the upcoming Afro-Asian conference.

  • October 20, 1954

    Minutes of the Second Meeting between Premier Zhou Enlai and Nehru

    Zhou and Nehru continue to discuss the regional situations in Asia and Africa and the overarching foreign policy views of China and India.

  • October 21, 1954

    Talking Points from Premier Zhou Enlai’s Third Meeting with Nehru

    Zhou Enlai and Nehru discuss Sino-Indian relations, as well as China and India's views toward Thailand, Indonesia, Korea, Vietnam, and Ceylon (Sri Lanka).

  • October 21, 1954

    Minutes of the Third Meeting between Premier Zhou Enlai and Nehru

    Zhou and Nehru discuss developments in South Asia and Southeast Asia.

  • October 23, 1954

    Minutes of Chairman Mao Zedong’s Second Meeting with Nehru

    Mao and Nehru have an extensive discussion about global affairs, the legacy of World War II, and the likelihood of another world war.

  • October 26, 1954

    Minutes of the Fourth Meeting between Premier Zhou Enlai and Nehru

    Zhou Enlai and Nehru touch on issues related to Yugoslavia, Pakistan, the Geneva Conference, and Indonesia.

  • October 26, 1954

    Minutes of Chairman Mao Zedong’s Third Meeting with Nehru

    Om the final day of Nehru's visit, he and Mao discuss Soviet technical assistance and relations with Burma.

  • November 15, 1954

    Cable from Chinese Embassy in Indonesia, 'Regarding Reactions to the Asian-African Conference Announcement'

    Zhang Qingfa reports on the Indonesian reactions to the Asian-African Conference, including a lengthy article by an Indonesian journalist promoting economic cooperation among the Afro-Asian countries.

  • December 04, 1954

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Indonesia, 'Report on the Situation of the Bogor Conference'

    Discussion of plans for the Asian-African Conference, including whether or not China will be included.

  • December 06, 1954

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Indonesia, 'The Prime Ministers of India, Burma, Pakistan, Ceylon are Preparing to Attend the Bogor Conference'

    Ambassador to Indonesia Huang Zhen reports that the prime ministers of India, Burma, Ceylon and Pakistan are planning to attend the Bogor Conference. Ceylon's request that China, Japan, Israel and Turkey not be invited to the Asian-African Conference has been rejected.

  • December 09, 1954

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Receiving the Prime Ministers of India and Other Countries and Attending the Asian-African Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry informed the Chinese Ambassador to Indonesia of Beijing's eagerness to participate in the Asian-African Conference and asked him to pay attention to Indonesia's attitude on this matter.

  • December 12, 1954

    Cable from Peng Di, 'Please Advise on Reporting on the Afro-Asian Conference'

  • December 15, 1954

    Report from the Asia Section, Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'On the Asian-African Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry reported that Indonesia’s intention to hold the Asian-African Conference was to establish a neutral, third group to counter the US and the Soviet Union. It also reported the attitudes of the invited countries and the reactions of the Western countries toward the Conference. It concluded that it would be beneficial for China to participate in the Conference and to influence the political situation in the Conference.