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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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Bandung Conference, 1955

Leading representatives from twenty-nine newly independent African, Asian, and Middle Eastern countries came together for the Afro-Asian Conference in Bandung, Indonesia, from 19 April-24 April 1955. (Image: Delegates attending the Bandung Conference pose for a group photo, April 1955) (See also: The Second Asian-African Conference.)

  • December 18, 1954

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Indonesia, 'Various Indonesian Groups are Paying Attention to the Bogor Conference'

    A review of Indonesian press coverage of the Bogor Conference and plans for the upcoming Asian-African Conference.

  • December 20, 1954

    Cable from Huang Zhen, 'The Prime Ministers of India and Other Countries are Going to Jakarta to attend the Bogor Conference'

    Report on plans for the Bogor Conference, including arrival dates of Prime Minister Nehru and other Indian officials, and the mass assembly on the 30th.

  • December 25, 1954

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Regarding Our Attitude towards the Afro-Asian Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry informed Chinese embassies overseas that China supported the Asian-African Conference as well as the participation of the countries with whom China had no diplomatic relation, such as Japan, the Philippines, and Thailand. China also emphasized that Chiang Kai-shek was not to be invited to the Conference.

  • December 29, 1954

    Cable from Peng Di, 'Brief Report on the situation of the Bogor Conference'

    Brief report on the secret meeting of the Bogor Conference on the 28th. It was agreed to ask Indonesia to organize the Asian-African Conference in April the following year.

  • December 29, 1954

    Cable from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Intelligence Department, 'The Agenda of the Five Southeast Asian Countries from the Bogor Conference and the Five Countries’ Attitudes towards China’s Participation in the Afro-Asian Conference '

    The agenda of the Bogor Conference was to determine the purposes, timing, and participants of the Asian-African Conference. The five Southeast Asian countries agreed that China and Japan should participate in the Asian-African Conference, but some countries also insisted on the participation of US allies such as Thailand and the Philippines.

  • December 31, 1954

    Cable from Huang Zhen, 'Nehru Hopes that Premier Zhou Can Attend Afro-Asian Conference'

    In a reception, Nehru tells Huang Zhen that he hopes that Premier Zhou Enlai can attend the Asian-African Conference.

  • December 31, 1954

    Cable from Peng Di, 'Situation of the Bogor Conference'

    Report from the Bogor Conference. The main issue of the conference was whether or not to invite China to the Asian-African Conference. The five principles of peaceful coexistence were also discussed and approved, but not published.

  • 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'List of Problems Between China and Other Asian-African Countries'

    A list of problems between China and other Asian-African countries

  • 1955

    Information on Japan’s Participation in the Asian-African Conference

    A Chinese report on Japan's participation before the Asian-African Conference. The report observes that the Japanese public paid more attention to this conference than to the previous Bangkok conference and highlighted Tokyo's desire to cooperate with China.

  • 1955

    Report by the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Some Existing Issues in and Suggestions for the Asia-Africa Conference'

    A Chinese Foreign Ministry report on three sets of issues facing the Asian-African Conference.

  • 1955

    View of the Asian-African Conference from the Bogor Conference

  • January 02, 1955

    Cable from Huang Zhen, 'Situation Report of the Bogor Conference'

    Huang Zhen reports the circumstances of the receptions and dinners hosted by Indonesia and his personal conversations with the Ceylonese premier, the Indonesian premier and the Indonesian foreign minister during the Bogor Conference.

  • January 06, 1955

    Cable from Peng Di, 'Third Intelligence Report on the Insider Situation of the Bogor Conference'

    Report on the Bogor Conference, the nomination of countries to attend the Asian-African Conference and the issue of whether or not to invite China.

  • January 07, 1955

    Cable from Huang Zhen, 'Regarding the Situation at Bogor'

    According to Huang Zhen, the Indonesian government had had the intention to invite China to attend the Asian-African Conference. The Indonesian authority gives high evaluations to the Bogor Conference. Currently, the Indonesian government are actively preparing for the Asian-African Conference.

  • January 08, 1955

    Cable from Peng Di, 'Regarding the Situation of the Bogor Conference'

    Peng Di reports on discussions at the Bogor Conference, including the status of the five principles of peaceful coexistence and inter-asian economic cooperation.

  • January 10, 1955

    Cable from Feng Xuan, 'Reaction of Britain, United States, France towards the Kuala Lumpur Five Countries inviting China to attend the Afro-Asian Conference'

    The UK responded the decision of inviting China to attend the Asian-African Conference with anger, stating that countries in the Bogor Conference had wrong expectations toward China. The US feared that China would have great influence on the Asian-African Conference and thus weaken US influence in the region. The US and UK also worried that China’s participation would improve China-Japan relations. French press expressed this decision as the evidence of the failure of the US power in Southeast Asia.

  • January 16, 1955

    Cable from Huang Zhen, 'Number of People Attending the Afro-Asian Conference, and Related Matters'

    Huang Zhen informs the foreign ministry that according to the chair of the Department of Law and Economy of the Indonesian Foreign Ministry, Indonesia decides that the member number of each official delegation attending the Asian-African conference will be 10.

  • January 16, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Draft of the Tentative Working Plan for Participating in the Asian-African Conference'

    The note stated that the Asian-African Conference could be a great contribution in establishing international peace. Among the participants, there were Chinese allies, neutral countries, and American allies. China had to isolate American power in the Conference and befriend the neutral countries. The Chinese Foreign Ministry therefore drafted the plan accordingly.

  • January 17, 1955

    Plan (Draft) for Compilation, Translation and Publication in Cooperation for the Propaganda in the Asian-African Conference

    A list of books and pamphlets to be distributed by China at the Asian-African for the purpose of propaganda. The topics concerned include: Nationality, Religion in China, China in general, Taiwan, and China's Five Principles

  • January 17, 1955

    Summary of the Informal Discussion on Information Material Work during China's Preparation for the Asian-African Conference

    Informal discussion in the Information Department of the Chinese Foreign Ministry on the preparation for propaganda work at the Asian-African Conference. The discussion concerns the dispatch of journalists, the exchange of culture and the distribution of propaganda materials