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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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China-Southeast Asia Relations

China was a major player in Cold War Southeast Asia, advocating for socialist revolutions and directly supporting independence struggles.

  • October 18, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Indonesia, 'Reactions to China's Nuclear Test'

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Indonesia describing positive responses from Indonesian government officials and foreign government officials in Indonesia regarding China's nuclear test.

  • October 19, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Indonesia, 'The Message from Premier Zhou has been handed Handed to the Indonesian officials Officials'

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Indonesia describing the planned discussion between Ambassador Yao and Subandrio regarding China's first nuclear weapons test.

  • October 20, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Vietnam, 'Reactions to China's Testing of an Atomic Bomb (6)'

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Vietnam entails positive responses of Le Duan, Pham Hùng and Ly Ban regarding China's first testing of an Atomic Bomb.

  • October 23, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Indonesia, 'Subandrio Met with Ambassador Yao for a Discussion on Nuclear Test'

    Description of a conversation between Chinese Ambassador Yao Zhongming and Indonesian Foreign Minister Subandrio. Subandrio expresses support for China's recent nuclear test, declaring that it will "contribute to world peace." Subandrio suggests a proposal that the upcoming Conference on Disarmament in Geneva invite China, along with a number of other Afro-Asian countries, which Yao responds negatively to, because this conference is convened by the United Nations.

  • October 27, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Ambassador Yao, Please Set an Appointment with Subandrio'

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry responding to a previous cable sent by Ambassador Yao Zhongming, describing a discussion with Subandrio about a recent Chinese nuclear test. The Foreign Ministry suggests that Subandrio, by suggesting a that the Conference on Disarmament in Geneva should invite China, is collaborating with "imperialists and the revisionists in their conspiracy to oppose the nuclear test in China." The Ministry asks to set up an appointment with Subandrio to clearly express China's disagreement with his suggestion, including in the cable specific answers to the previous suggestions Subandrio made to Yao.

  • October 30, 1964

    Reply from Acting President, Dr. Subandrio, to Premier Zhou Enlai

    Subandrio writes a letter to Premier Zhou Enlai, praising the idea proposed in a previous message from China about holding a summit conference on general disarmament and banning of nuclear weapons. Subandrio suggests that the conference could have a higher chance of success if the 5 nuclear states (US, USSR, UK, France, and China) met prior to the summit.

  • 1965

    Organizing Cargo to be Shipped by Air Transport from China to Burma, Cambodia, and Pakistan

    A report on organizing air routes between China and Burma, Cambodia, and Pakistan.

  • January 06, 1965

    Note No. 2/65 on Conversations with Comrade Shcherbakov about the Developmental Tendencies in the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, on 22 and 28 December 1964

    Conversation between the East German and Soviet ambassadors to Vietnam, on the Sino-Vietnamese relationship. Shcherbakov expresses his belief that China is increasingly using Vietnam as a pawn, and that, as a result, the Chinese are pushing the Vietnamese towards talks of negotiations with the United States.

  • January 27, 1965

    Record of Premier Zhou and Vice Premier Chen Yi's Third Conversation with Subandrio

    Zhou and Subandrio discuss Indonesia's withdrawal from the United Nations, non-alignment, the Soviet Union, and the Second Asian-African Conference.

  • March 14, 1965

    Chinese Foreign Ministry Report, Burmese Attitudes toward Problems in Vietnam

    Report describing how Burma has been indirectly protesting the United States' continuous air raids of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, for example through their mass media.

  • February 17, 1965

    Research Materials from the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs Subunit Concerning Burma’s Political Situation and International Relations Trends, etc.

    Materials stating that Ne Win's government favored neutrality in foreign relations and avoids interfering in international disputes. Burma wants to develop friendly relations with China and receive financial support from China, while keeping its distance. It opposes American and fears it. It relies on Soviet revisionism while also remaining wary of them.

  • May 10, 1965

    Chinese Ambassador to Burma Geng Biao discusses India's Proposal for the Establishment of an Asian-African Armed Forces with the Burmese Foreign Minister

    Burmese Foreign Minister U Thi Han stated that Burma had not been aware of India's proposal on forming an Asian-African armed forces, but Burma would champion justice and see through India's scheming.

  • May 19, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Indonesia, 'Reaction to China's Second Nuclear Test'

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Indonesia describing positive responses of Indonesian government officials, media and public regarding China's second nuclear test.

  • June 15, 1965

    Record of Conversation between Premier Zhou Enlai and Chairman Ho Chi Minh

    Zhou Enlai and Ho Chi Minh discuss preparations for the second Asian-African Conference and the potential participation of countries such as the Soviet Union, Malaysia, and India.

  • June 22, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Burma, 'On Burmese Politics and Recommendations for Ne Win’s Visit to China'

    Report that the internal situation in Burma is deteriorating, causing dissatisfactions towards the Ne Win government. China would show the highest courtesies to Ne Win's during his visit to China.

  • September 18, 1965

    National Science Committee, Briefings on Receiving Foreign Guests, No. 1

    Description of the first meeting between members of a special team at the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the visiting Atomic Energy Group of the Indonesian Economic Delegation. The Indonesian delegation explains that the main goal of the delegation's China visit is to understand the status of China's research on atomic energy, making a number of requests to visit and learn about relevant atomic laboratories, nuclear reactors, and potentially send staff to research together with Chinese experts.

  • September 20, 1965

    National Science Committee, Briefings on Receiving Foreign Guests, No. 2

    Report on the second meeting with the Atomic Energy Group of the Indonesian Economic Delegation. The head of the delegation asks to visit factors and labs that select uranium ore and process raw materials into fuel. In negotiations, the Indonesian side proposes longterm cooperation between Indonesia and China on atomic energy, and protective measures against nuclear radiation.

  • September 21, 1965

    National Science Committee, Briefings on Receiving Foreign Guests, No. 3

    Continued report on visit of Atomic Energy Group of the Indonesian Economic Delegation. Describes a visit made by the Indonesian delegation to a number of sites, including a nuclear reactor, multiple laboratories, and a computer science research institute at Tsinghua University. The report notes that the head of the Indonesian group was a member of the Air Force, confirming that part of the delegation consists of "military men." Also summarizes questions raised by one of the group members.

  • September 23, 1965

    National Science Committee, Briefings on Receiving Foreign Guests, No. 4

    4th report on the visit of the Atomic Energy Group of the Indonesian Economic Delegation. Summarizes the group's visit to various science departments at Peking University, and the visit to laboratories of nuclear physics, electronics, and radiation chemistry, along with several other science department laboratories. Describes the "very positive reactions" of the visiting group, and the group's request to send Indonesian exchange students to Peking University.

  • September 25, 1965

    National Science Committee, Briefings on Receiving Foreign Guests, No. 7

    7th report on the visit of the Atomic Energy Group of the Indonesian Economic Delegation. Indonesian atomic energy group visits the No. 2 Institute of Atomic Energy Research in China, touring various facilities in the institute including a heavy water reactor built with Soviet aid. Report notes the group's satisfaction with the visit.