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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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China at the United Nations

The United Nations was a key battleground between the People's Republic of China and the Republic of China in the global struggle to represent China.

  • January 07, 1950

    Telegram, Mao Zedong to Liu Shaoqi and Zhou Enlai

    Mao Zedong issues a letter on Chinese representation at the United Nations.

  • January 07, 1950

    Telegram, Mao Zedong to Zhou Enlai and CCP CC

    Mao Zedong updates Zhou Enlai on the Sino-Soviet negotiations and Sino-Soviet cooperation at the United Nations.

  • January 13, 1950

    Telegram, Mao Zedong to Liu Shaoqi

    Mao Zedong cables to Liu Shaoqi regarding the status of US property and institutions in China, the situation in Hong Kong, and Chinese representation at the United Nations.

  • January 18, 1950

    Telegram, Mao Zedong to Liu Shaoqi

    Mao Zedong informs Liu Shaoqi that Zhang Wentian, not Zhang Hanfu, ought to be appointed as the PRC Ambassador to the United Nations.

  • December 05, 1950

    VKP(b) CC Politburo decision with approved orders to Vyshinsky in New York and Roshchin in Beijing with message for Zhou Enlai

    Memorandums from the VKP(b) CC to Vyshinsky and Roshchin regarding the Soviet and PRC stances on discussions in the UN General Assembly and Security Council on the Chinese intervention in Korea.

  • December 07, 1950

    Ciphered telegram from Roshchin conveying message from Zhou Enlai to Soviet Government

    A telegram from Roshchin in Beijing to Moscow, informing the Soviet leadership of the terms under which the Chinese will consider an armistice on the Korean Peninsula.

  • December 08, 1950

    Telegram from the Chinese Communist Party Central Committee to Wu Xiuquan and Qiao Guanhua

    The CCP Central Committee gives instructions to the Chinese representatives to the UN on how to reply to confrontation over the Korean issue. The Chinese representatives are to express willingness to end military action as well as desire to know the UN and the U.S.'s positions on the conditions for an armistice.

  • December 16, 1950

    Telegram from Zhou Enlai to Wu Xiuquan and Qiao Guanhua

    Zhou Enlai advises the Chinese UN representatives on how to explain and respond to representatives from other countries regarding the Korea issue and the proposed armistice.

  • February 01, 1951

    United Nations General Assembly Resolution 498(V)

    United Nations resolution calling on the People's Republic of China to cease all hostilities on the Korean peninsula.

  • April 15, 1954

    The Question of a Conference of the Five Great Powers with the Participation of the PRC

    At a conference of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the USSR, US, Britain and France, the USSR proposes a conference including the PRC, but the others oppose China's participation.

  • October 19, 1954

    Minutes of the First Meeting between Premier Zhou Enlai and Nehru

    Zhou Enlai and Nehru discuss French and Portuguese colonialism in India and China, the Sino-American conflict, conflict in the Taiwan Straits, and the China issue at the United Nations.

  • January 04, 1955

    Minutes of Conversation between Premier Zhou Enlai and Soviet Ambassador Pavel Yudin regarding Dag Hammarskjold’s Trip to Beijing

    The Soviet ambassador brought to Zhou Enlai a telegram between the United Nations Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjöld and the UN Assistant Secretary-General. The telegram stated that Hammarskjöld was going to visit Beijing for negotiating the release of the US pilots who had served in the Korean War and been captured by the Chinese.

  • October 14, 1956

    Notes of an Interview with Zhou Enlai

    Zhou Enlai describes China's desire to gain international recognition. However, the question of Taiwan as one out of "Two Chinas" makes it difficult to agree internationally, since Great Britain and the United States recognize Taiwan and not PR China as the legitimate Chinese government. Hong Kong and the US endeavor to gain control of Chiang Kai-Shek's Taiwan are also discussed.

  • September 04, 1958

    Memo, Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs to the Soviet Embassy in China

    Memorandum detailing Chinese strategy in countering US support for Taiwan and US policy in Asia.

  • September 03, 1961

    Telegram from the Albanian ambassador in Belgrade, Tahmaz Beqari, to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Albania

    The ambassador reports on the proceedings of the Belgrade conference of non-aligned countries, and about the differences and nuances of the stances of various delegations. Except India, Libya, and the United Arab Republic, all delegations were in favor of China’s participation in the United Nations. In addition, Nehru pointed out that colonialism is in agony while the Ghanaian, Cuban, Iraqi, Nepalese and Ethiopian delegations claimed to the contrary. When Dorticós, the Cuban President, began unmasking American imperialism, the diplomats of Western countries left the conference. The diplomats of friendly countries, according to Beqari, called the speeches of the conference “80% positive.”

  • November 02, 1963

    Summary of Ideas Expressed by the Prime Minister Zhou Enlai

    During Edgar Faure's visit to China, Zhou Enlai lays out China's demands for Sino-French normalization.

  • November 07, 1963

    Report Sent to General de Gaulle, President of the French Republic, by Edgar Faure, on his Mission to China

    Edgar Faure briefs Charles de Gaulle on his visit to China, his meetings with senior Chinese leaders, and the prospects for Sino-French normalization.

  • January 23, 1964

    Report, UN Department of Political and Security Council Affairs, 'French Recognition of the C.P.R. and Its Consequences for the United Nations'

    The Department of Political and Security Council Affairs outlines the diplomatic consequences of France's recognition of the People's Republic of China in 1964.

  • November 27, 1968

    Italian Policy towards the People’s Republic of China

    An Italian Foreign Ministry report on future policies leading to Italy's recognition of the People's Republic of China and Beijing's admission to the United Nations.

  • July 14, 1969

    Note from Ambassador Caruso for Ambassador Vinci

    The Italian delegation to the UN decides to vote in favor of the assignment of the Chinese seat to the PRC.