Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

No image found.

North Korean Public Diplomacy

Throughout the 1970s, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) waged an intensive diplomatic campaign to attract new supporters abroad, including in the United States, and participate in the international community. Pyongyang launched public diplomacy campaigns in approximately fifty countries and funded some 200 “friendship” organizations abroad. Through “people-to-people diplomacy,” North Korea hoped to improve its standing in the international community and foster support for its positions in the United Nations General Assembly.  (Image: A delegation of the American-Korean Friendship and Information Center visits the Chollima Cultural Center in Pyongyang with Kang Ryang-uk.)

  • 1971

    Insert included in Operation War Shift: Position Paper, Second (Revised) Edition

    The AKFIC claims that "there is much misinformation and deliberate untruth about Korea" in the United States.

  • 1971

    Operation War Shift: Position Paper, Second (Revised) Edition

    A position paper of the American-Korean Friendship and Information Center, describing the organization's objectives in the context of the Vietnam War.

  • February 25, 1971

    Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos—and Korea Again?

    An advertisement in the New York Times announces the establishment of the American-Korean Friendship and Information Center and warns of a new war in Korea if the U.S. did not remove its troops from the peninsula

  • 1972

    About the AFKIC: American-Korean Friendship and Information Center

    The American-Korean Friendship and Information Center (AKFIC) describes its founding, organization, and activities.

  • 1972

    A Visit to the DPRK: A Report from the Delegation of the American-Korean Friendship and Information Center to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

    A report on a North Korean sponsored tour of Pyongyang made by staff and supporters of the AKFIC in 1972.

  • 1973

    Comments from Leading American Senators

    An insert to an AKFIC publication on the role of the U.S. Congress in U.S.-North Korean relations.

  • 1973

    For Congress to Act We Must Speak Out, Loud and Clear!

    The AKFIC urges the U.S. Congress to positively respond to a letter from North Korea's Supreme People's Assembly.

  • April 06, 1973

    Letter to the Congress of the United States from the Supreme People’s Assembly, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

    North Korea’s Supreme People’s Assembly calls for the removal of U.S. forces from South Korea and an end to U.S. “interference in the internal affairs of the Korean people”

  • 1974

    Letter from George B. Murphy, Jr., Fred J. Carrier, and Joseph Brandt

    The AKFIC's leadership calls on readers to lobby the U.S. Congress and other organizations to improve U.S.-North Korea relations.

  • 1974

    A Letter to Congress: Appeal of Constituents and Voters to Our Elected Representatives in the Congress of the USA

    In the aftermath of a second overture to the U.S. Congress from North Korea’s Supreme People's Assembly, the AKFIC mobilized a letter-writing campaign among its supporters.

  • 1974

    North Korean Journey: A View of Workers’ Democracy

    Fred Carrier reports on a visit to North Korea made by the AKFIC in June-July 1973.

  • 1974

    Korea Must Be Reunified: A Call for Friendship between the Peoples of the United States and the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea

    Kim Il Sung praises the work of AKFIC for giving “wide publicity to our people’s struggle [in the United States]…exposing the fascist dictatorship of South Korean reactionaries…as well as U.S. aggression in Korea.”

  • 1976

    Korea: Uneasy Truce in the Land of the Morning Calm (New York: American-Korean Friendship and Information Center, 1976)

    The AFKIC introduces its mission, the history of Korea, and the current situation on the Peninsula.