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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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Cold War Origins

This collection of primary source documents discusses international relations during World War II and the years shortly after. It begins with the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact signed in 1939 and ends with documents from the 1950’s. The collection contains a wide variety of documents including agreements, memorandums, meeting minutes, cables, letters, diary entries, and military reports from WWII. The documents mainly come from Russian and Bulgarian archives. See also the End of the Cold War. (Image, Clement Attlee, Harry Truman, and Joseph Stalin at the Potsdam Conference, July 1945, NARA, Army Signal Corps Collection, USA C-186)

  • September 17, 1948

    Bi-Monthly Report from Bulgarian Intelligence on the Civil War in Greece

    An intelligence report on the on-going Greek Civil War. Among other things, the report emphasizes the American support for the Greek government and the low morale in the National Army.

  • September 28, 1948

    Central Intelligence Agency Report, "Consequences of a Breakdown in Four-Power Negotiations on Germany"

    Summarizes Soviet objectives and strategies in entering into Four-Power discussions about Berlin and Germany.

  • December 10, 1948

    Central Intelligence Agency Memorandum for the President on the Situation in Berlin

    CIA Memorandum for President Truman on US position on Soviet actions in Berlin.

  • February 10, 1949

    Proposal for Counter-Intelligence Operation ''Traitor'' Against Yugoslav Agents

    A proposal for the measures against the Yugoslav agents and their collaborators who, on Tito’s behalf, were allegedly working for the annexation of the Pirin Region by the Yugoslav Federation.

  • April 26, 1949

    Secret Daily Information Bulletin for the Prime Minister Georgi Dimitrov, communicated from Sofia to Moscow

    The Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Ministry of the Internal Affairs create an informational bulletin on the domestic political developments.

  • October 01, 1949

    Gromyko's diary entry of 1 October 1949

    Gromyko's entry of 1 October 1949, in his daily record, detailing his individual meetings with American Ambassador Kirk, British Ambassador Kelly, and French Charge d'Affaires Frankfort.

  • February 22, 1950

    Notes from L.A. Leont’ev's February 1950 Meeting with Stalin

    A second meeting with Stalin and the editors of the political economy textbooks, in which Stalin outlines the distinction between the people's democracies of Eastern Europe and China.

  • April 14, 1950

    National Security Council Report, NSC 68, 'United States Objectives and Programs for National Security'

    On US national security policy at the beginning of the Cold War. Includes an assessment of the conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union, as well as US and Soviet nuclear weapons capabilities.

  • April 24, 1950

    Notes from L.A. Leont’ev's April 1950 Meeting with Stalin, Regarding Political Economy Textbook

    Stalin voices his displeaure over the political economy textbook. He urges the authors to study Marx in greater depth, yet to also make the text simple. Stalin stresses the importance of the Soviet Union having a political economy textbook.

  • May 30, 1950

    Stalin’s Meeting about Political Economy textbook, 30 May 1950

    Meeting about Political economy. Discussions on political economy and book pending publication.

  • September 16, 1950

    Resolution of the Central Committee, September 16, 1950, to revise a diplomatic note on the question of general elections in Germany and Gromyko's note to Stalin on this matter.

    Gromyko’s 14 September 1950 note to Stalin about a diplomatic note to US, UK, and France on the process for general elections in Germany; and the Central Committee’s 16 September 1950 decision to seek revision of the diplomatic note.

  • September 22, 1950

    Communication from Gromyko to Stalin Concerning a Draft Reply to the United States, England, and France on the Matter of the National Police of the German Democratic Republic, 22 September 1950

    Communication from Gromyko to Stalin Concerning a Draft Reply to the United States, England, and France on the Matter of the National Police of the German Democratic Republic, 22 September 1950

  • February 15, 1952

    Notes from L.A. Leont’ev's February 1952 Meeting about Questions in Political Economy

    Stalin discusses his "Remarks" on the finished political economy textbook, and fields questions regarding the "Remarks" and various terminologies in the book. Stalin emphasizes the importance of keeping the public knowledge of the extent of his involvement in the formation of the text to a minimum.

  • January 20, 1953

    Eisenhower's Inaugural Address

    Eisenhower's presidential inaugural address after his election in 1952.

  • January 21, 1953

    VGU Information on Activities of the Swiss, Belgian, Dutch and Swedish Intelligences Services

    Report on the intelligence activities of some Western governments in Sofia. The report identifies the main areas of interest of the foreign intelligence services, names of some agents and names of collaborators.