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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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Cuban Missile Crisis

Documents concerning the Cuban Missile Crisis of October 1962--a major confrontation that brought the Soviet Union and the United States close to war over the presence of Soviet missiles in Cuba. The documents are drawn from countries all around the world and discuss armament and military supplies sent to Cuba, troop training, security issues in the region, and relations with the US. There are many items of correspondence during the crisis itself, including letters between Soviet representatives in Cuba, the US, the UN, and the USSR Foreign Ministry. See also Cuban Foreign Relations, and the related collections in the Nuclear Proliferation International History Project. (Image, Castro and Khrushchev, 1960)

  • July 13, 1962

    Secret Agreement July 13, 1962

    Agreement with annexes between Cuba and the USSR. A memo from the USSR Council of Ministers allowing negotiations, and the signing of the protocol regarding special materials for the agreement between the USSR and Cuba.

  • August 23, 1962

    Soviet Report on American Attempts at Disseminating Fabricated News on Cuba

    Report on the American effort to spread false rumors about the arrival of Soviet military equipments and personnel in Cuba. To counter this subversive attempt, the Cuban security organs has established full control of foreign correspondence and captured maps and intelligence reports.

  • August 31, 1962

    Speech by Senator Keating, "Soviet Activities in Cuba"

    Keating alleges that the Soviet Union is building "rocket installations" in Cuba and urges President Kennedy to take action.

  • September 01, 1962

    Telegram from Mexican Embassy, Havana

    A telegram from the Mexican Embassy in Cuba describing the incorrect facts that have been reported by the press lately, regarding commercial maritime traffic between Cuba and other socialist countries and counterrevolutionary forces.

  • September 02, 1962

    Note from Cuban Ambassador to Bulgaria, Salvador Garcia Aguero, to Bulgarian Foreign Minister, 2 September 1962

    Warning about the content of Castro’s declaration with regard to US threats against Cuba. Reference to the media and other authorities copies of the declaration.

  • September 06, 1962

    Memorandum from R. Malinovsky to N.S. Khrushchev, 6 September 1962

    Malinovsky informs Khrushchev of the details regarding transport of missiles to Cuba and about reinforcing Cuba by air and adding to the troops already present.

  • September 07, 1962

    Telegram of Soviet Ambassador to Cuba A.I. Alekseev to the USSR Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    Alekseev sends a report on the nature of anti-Cuban propaganda and actions taken by the American government in United States and Latin America

  • September 08, 1962

    Memorandum, Malinovsky and Zakharov to Commander of Group of Soviet Forces in Cuba

    Malinovsky and Zakharov instruct the Commander of Soviet forces in Cuba on how to deploy navy, missile and air forces.

  • September 11, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to Cuba Alekseev to the USSR MFA

    Alekseev reports on a conversation with Raul Castro where Castro reinforces the strength of the Soviet-Cuban relationship.

  • September 14, 1962

    M. Zakharov and S. P. Ivanov to N.S. Khrushchev

    Zakharov and Ivanov report to Khrushchev the extent of US surveillance in Cuba and request extra fortifications for Soviet ships in Cuban waters.

  • September 14, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 14 September 1962

    Jelen discusses a conversation he had with [Foreign Minister Raúl] Roa [García] on 9 September. They discussed diplomatic visits, UN delegation sessions, and growing tensions in the 'Cuban situation' and possible US military action against Cuba.

  • September 21, 1962

    Report from Prague, 'Subject: Artillery, Anti-Aircraft Artillery and Missile Emplacements'

    German Federal Intelligence (BND) report on anti-aircraft artillery and missile bases in Cuba.

  • September 28, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Embassy in Havana

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy to Cuba reporting that the United States is already exercising, in a systematic character, strict naval and aerial vigilance around Cuba.

  • October, 1962

    Dutch Prime Minister Jan E. de Quay, 23-26 October 1962

    Short diary entries from Dutch Prime Minister Jan E. de Quay during the Cuban Missile Crisis.

  • October 01, 1962

    Roberto Ducci, 'I capintesta' [The Big Bosses] (excerpts)

    In the early pages of the chapter, Ducci describes how by 22 October 1962, he had just arrived in Brussels as member of a delegation which included the top echelons of Italian foreign policy: Foreign Minister Attilio Piccioni, Undersecretary Carlo Russo, Secretary General of the Ministry Attilio Cattani, and a number of other key dignitaries, including himself, who at the time was at the head of the Italian delegation which negotiated the possible accession of the United Kingdom to the European Economic Community. They had all gone to Brussels for a week of meetings between the Six members of the EEC, and were engaged in a preparatory meeting for the work ahead, when the news spread that the situation between the US and Cuba was deteriorating and that President Kennedy was about to give an important speech.

  • October 02, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Embassy in Havana

    A telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Cuba giving an update on the most recent internal political situation of Cuba, Russian armament and military personnel arriving.

  • October 04, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to the USA Anatoly F. Dobrynin to the USSR Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    Dobrynin sends the results of a meeting between Rusk, himself and the Foreign Ministers of Latin American countries where they discussed questions of security, trade, and the question of the Cuban government in exile.

  • October 05, 1962

    Handwritten Note for the Record by Colonel General S.P. Ivanov

    Ivanov takes notes on a conversation with Khrushchev regarding the progress of weapons en route to Cuba.

  • October 05, 1962

    Malinovsky Report on Special Ammunition for Operation Anadyr

    The Defense Minister's report to Khrushchev about the progress of shipping of Soviet armaments to Cuba specifically states that Aleksandrovsk was fully loaded and ready to sail.

  • October 08, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Embassy in Havana (de Gamboa)

    A telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Cuba describing the speech of Cuban President Dorticós, in the UN, as extremely ponderous and even conservative, by Cuban standards. Dorticos alluded at length to the North-American threats against Cuba, evidencing therefore, one more time, the “complex of invasion” that has motivated in large measures the comportment of the revolutionary government in international politics. Dorticos affirmed, moreover, that Cuba desires a “policy of peace and of coexistence” with all countries of the Continent, within an “absolute respect to the principle of non-intervention.”