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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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Interkit, 1966-1987

Interkit was an organization created by the Kremlin to coordinate Soviet-bloc analysis of and policy toward China from 1967 until

the mid-1980s. This institution, its name derived from the Russian word for China, “Kitai,” periodically gathered China experts from the USSR, its Warsaw Pact allies, and a shifting mix of other nations aligned with the Kremlin (e.g., Mongolia, Vietnam, Laos, and Cuba). In periodic meetings, the participants—primarily communist party functionaries but also, in some cases, diplomatic and/or academic China “hands”—considered the political, economic, ideological, cultural, and other dimensions of dealing with their problematic former ally. See also Sino-Soviet Split.(Image, cover of elementary school textbook from Guangxi, 1971)

  • October, 1966

    The Polish-Soviet Talks in Moscow: October 10-15, 1966

    Gomulka and Brezhnev discuss the Cultural Revolution in China and its implications for international communism. Also addressed is Chinese attitudes toward Vietnam.

  • January 18, 1967

    Polish-Soviet Talks in Lansk: January 18, 1967

    Gomulka, Podgorny and Brezhnev discuss an upcoming conference of communist parties. Central to the discussion is the attitude of the Chinese.

  • April 12, 1967

    Hungarian Workers Party CC Minutes of Meeting held on 12 April 1967

    Members of the Hungarian Central Committee discuss recent trips to Moscow and Budapest. Those involved debrief the group on discussions at both locations over the domestic situation in China and its possible repercussions for international communism.

  • June 16, 1967

    Note from the Conversation between Comrade Zenon Kliszko and CC CCP Secretary Liu Ningyi

    Comrade Kliszko presents Liu Ningyi with a letter from six socialist countries calling for a conference to discuss aid and coordination in Vietnam in response to "American imperialism." He urges China to rally against this common enemy, despite the ideological differences dividing the socialist nations. Liu responds harshly both to the proposal and to Comrade Kliszko's statement, arguing China "did not want anything to do with a revisionist clique of the Soviet Union’s leadership and its lackeys."

  • July 18, 1967

    Minutes of HSWP Politburo meeting held on 18 July 1967

    The Polish Political Committee makes recommendations to hold talks in Moscow aimed at "harmonizing positions on this policy of the Communist Party of China" based upon a proposal from the International Department.

  • December 27, 1967

    East German Report on First Interkit Meeting in Moscow, December 1967

    Report from the East German representatives on the Interkit meeting held from 14-21 December in Moscow. Describes the meetings agenda and the drafting of a joint assessment on China. Notes that the "Soviet comrades were attributing extraordinary high importance to the undertaking" and were very concerned about Chinese anti-Sovietism.

  • January, 1968

    Polish-Soviet Talks in Lansk

    Excerpts related to China from the Polish-Soviet talks of January 1968. Gomulka and Brezhnev agree that the "China issue will be the most difficult one during the consultative meeting in Budapest."

  • January 02, 1968

    Polish Informational Note from the Interkit Meeting in Moscow, December 1967

    An informational note detailing the discussions and proposals made during the Interkit meeting, which analyzed the situation within the CCP and the PRC, specifically the development of Maoism. General tone is negative and it is suggested that it is the obligation of the group to support "elements in China which maintain their loyalty to Marxism-Leninism and counter Maoism."

  • August 24, 1968

    Telegrams from Romanian Embassy, Beijing, to Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 22-24 August 1968

    A series of three telegrams reporting on a reception held at the Romanian Embassy in Beijing on August 23, 1968. Premier Zhou Enlai attended the event and gave a speech condemning the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia.

  • January, 1969

    East German Report on the Second Interkit Meeting in Berlin, January 1969

    Report from the East German representatives on an Interkit meeting held 28-31 January, 1969. The group made recommendations for coordinating anti-Maoist propaganda to counter China's increasing anti-Sovietism.

  • February 18, 1969

    Hungarian Politburo Minutes of the meeting of the Political Committee on 18 February 1969

    One of the main agenda items during this meeting was a discussion of the China question and a recent memorandum on the issue. It is debated whether the memorandum embellishes the isolation of Mao and his group, both internally and internationally. Participants also make predictions of how the situation in China will likely develop.

  • March 01, 1969

    Polish-Soviet Talks in Moscow

    Gomulka and Brezhnev discuss Sino-Soviet border skirmishes. Brezhnev claims the Chinese are preparing for their Congress and trying to "cement the moods of enmity toward the USSR." They also discuss the possibility of improved Sino-American ties.

  • July 28, 1969

    Note to Comrade Kliszko regarding the meeting of International Departments of 7 parties on the China Question

    An overview is provided of past efforts to meet and discuss the "China question," as well as a proposal for a similarly focused meeting in October 1969.

  • October, 1969

    Polish-Soviet Talks in Moscow

    Excerpts from Polish-Soviet talks that focus on the China question. Brezhnev posits that the Chinese were the source of ideological divergence, and more specifically that their attitude has progressed to anti-Sovietism and anti-communism. Included is a report from a meeting with Zhou Enlai, who in discussing Czechoslovakia said a "process of bourgeoisie transformation and corruption was taking place over there, which is normal for all of the socialist countries." He attributed the cultural revolution with cutting off the roots of corruption in China.

  • October 06, 1969

    Notes from a Conversation between Comrade Rakhmanin and Comrade Bruno Mahlow on Chinese Leadership and the Situation in China

    Rakhmanin discusses the topics addressed by Zhou Enlai and Comrade Kosygin in a recent meeting. He highlights such topics of conversation as Chinese/Soviet border lines, propaganda issues, Chinese domestic disturbances and foreign policies issues.

  • February 27, 1970

    Note regarding the Polish-Soviet Consultation on the China Topic

    A meeting is proposed for the international departments of the seven parties to meet and discuss issues related to China, including the political and economic situation in Shanghai, China's international activities, and the ideology of its leadership.

  • March, 1970

    Report on the China Problem Following the 9th Party Congress of the Chinese Communist Party

    This study addresses aspects of Chinese domestic and foreign policies after the 9th Congress of the Chinese Communist Party. Internal party disputes and undemocratic structures are said to characterize the Chinese leadership. The document offers an analysis of the socio-political state of affairs in China and states that the delay in economic growth is due to violations of the economic principles of Socialism. As far as its foreign policy is concerned, China is strengthening its military potential; Beijing's intensified relations with Western countries are condemned.

  • March, 1970

    CC CPSU International Department, Note on the China Problem Following the 9th Party Congress of the Chinese Communist Party

    This study addresses aspects of Chinese domestic and foreign policies after the 9th Congress of the Chinese Communist Party. Internal party disputes and undemocratic structures are said to characterize the Chinese leadership. The document offers an analysis of the socio-political state of affairs in China and states that the delay in economic growth is due to violations of the economic principles of Socialism. As far as its foreign policy is concerned, China is strengthening its military potential; Beijing's intensified relations with Western countries are condemned.

  • March 10, 1970

    East German Report on the Third Interkit Meeting in Warsaw, March 1970

    This East German report, issued after the Interkit meeting in Warsaw, addresses the situation in China under the leadership of Mao Zedong. Among the issues discussed are the ninth congress of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) and Mao's anti-Soviet foreign policy, especially China's relations with the US and West Germany. The ninth congress of the CCP is said to have stabilized Mao's position and is seen as the founding congress of a new party. Among other topics, the delegates also discuss ways to improve anti-Maoist propaganda.

  • March 19, 1970

    Report from the Meeting of Seven Parties on the China Issue

    A review of the 10-12 March meeting during which the CC International Departments discussed the China issue. A great deal of time was spent discussing whether or not China was still a socialist country. A "Protocol Note" was unanimously adopted as a result of the meeting.