Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

No image found.

Interkit, 1966-1987

Interkit was an organization created by the Kremlin to coordinate Soviet-bloc analysis of and policy toward China from 1967 until

the mid-1980s. This institution, its name derived from the Russian word for China, “Kitai,” periodically gathered China experts from the USSR, its Warsaw Pact allies, and a shifting mix of other nations aligned with the Kremlin (e.g., Mongolia, Vietnam, Laos, and Cuba). In periodic meetings, the participants—primarily communist party functionaries but also, in some cases, diplomatic and/or academic China “hands”—considered the political, economic, ideological, cultural, and other dimensions of dealing with their problematic former ally. See also Sino-Soviet Split.(Image, cover of elementary school textbook from Guangxi, 1971)

  • June 21, 1977

    Note About a Meeting between Comrade Hermann Axen, Member of the Politburo and Secretary of the SED CC, and Comrade O. B. Rakhmanin, Candidate of the CPSU CC and First Deputy Head of the International Department of CC, on 17 June 1977

    An excerpt of speeches given to the meeting participants. A major theme is "how to win back China."

  • March 06, 1978

    Informational Note from the Eight Parties’ Meeting in Budapest

    This document presents "information and views on the current problems in the international and workers’ movement, the China question and anti-communist offensive struggle against imperialism."

  • September, 1978

    Note from the Conversation with the Politburo Member of the CC CPS, Minster of Foreign Affairs of the USSR, Comrade Andrei Gromyko

    A short excerpt from a discussion about China

  • December, 1978

    East German Report on the Tenth Interkit Meeting in Havana, December 1978

    This report, issued after the tenth Interkit meeting in Havana, addresses China's domestic and foreign policies. China is said to be obstructing the process of international détente by developing relations with NATO and West Germany. The report condemns the Chinese interference in Romanian, Yugoslavian and Korean politics. The authors believe that China is trying to divide the Socialist countries into two opposing groups. The newly intensified Chinese-US relations are criticized, as is China's policy of allowing more Western influence to shape its domestic policies and economic strategies.

  • December 12, 1978

    East German Record of Conversation with Fidel Castro after Tenth Interkit Meeting in Havana, December 1978

    Short summary of an East German meeting with Fidel Castro. Castro discusses China and the recent Interkit meeting, as well as the issue of Cuban exiles in the United States.

  • February 09, 1979

    Mongolian Record of Conversation with Soviet Officials in Moscow, February 1979

    Discusses the cancellation of the alliance treaty between China and the Soviet Union, and the impact this will have on the Mongolian People’s Republic. They are urged not to hurry the cancellation of the treaty, however, because China has not yet explicitly asked for it. They also note that there are anti-Soviet propaganda items being spread in Korea, and the growing role the U.S. is playing in Chinese affairs.

  • March 01, 1979

    Information regarding the Visit of the Study Group of the CC PUWP in China

    Talks about the development of trade and economy in Poland, and the need to develop Chinese relations with Poland, which can be done by developing the Chinese language more in Poland.

  • April 12, 1979

    Mongolian Memorandum of Conversation with O.B. Rakhmanin

    Rakhmanin reports on the status of the Sino-Soviet treaty, which he says hinges on the Sino-Vietnamese situation, which he tries to explain in terms of territory and aid to the Vietnamese.

  • July, 1979

    Informational Note from the Meeting of Secretaries of CC Fraternal Countries in Berlin (July 1979)

    Reports on the participants at this meeting in Berlin, noting that the situation with China and Vietnam were discussed at length.

  • December, 1979

    Note regarding the Visit of the CC PUWP Inter-Departmental Study Group in China

    Discusses a recent visit in China by the CC PUWP noting that their ”fundamental opinions” about China were correct, and that there needs to be more active propaganda and further studies in China, such as those undertaken by Poland.

  • 1980

    CC CPSU Information on Chinese Foreign Policy Issues

    Discusses the joint efforts by Chinese and American leaders to promote a better relationship between these two countries, at the expense of the Soviet Union and of communism. The U.S. seems to be trying to capitalize on a growing “internal stability” in China, and the U.S. is even now selling equipment to China. The Soviet Union does not believe that this alliance will prove powerful enough to significantly impair other Socialist countries, but their alliance should also not be ignored.

  • February, 1980

    Polish Record of Soviet alliance Meeting in Moscow, February 1980

    Discusses the growing aggression seen in China and the effects of its closer relationship with the United States.

  • June, 1980

    East German Report on the Eleventh Interkit Meeting in Poland, June 1980

    Report from the East German representatives on the 11th Interkit meeting held in Poland. This was the first meeting attended by the Vietnamese.

  • June 18, 1980

    East German Record of a Meeting of Delegation Leaders at the Eleventh Interkit Meeting in Poland

    This record of a meeting of the delegation leaders attending the 11th Interkit meeting addresses China's strategy in the area of international relations. The document expresses concern regarding Beijing's policies and calls for unity among the Communist countries. International issues discussed include Soviet-Korean relations, i.e., the Belgrade meeting between Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev and his Korean counterpart Kim Il Sung. Conditions in Albania, Romania, and Yugoslavia, and the positions of these countries within the Communist bloc, are critically assessed. Another topic is the improvement of anti-Maoist propaganda.

  • November 10, 1980

    Hungarian Report on 'Economic Interkit' Meeting in Bulgaria, October 1980

    Reports on a meeting that took place in Bulgaria regarding cooperative measures to be taken in regards to the People’s Republic of China. It notes that China has reduced the number of items it seeks to import, and is hinting that it will continue to do so in the future, as well. The Soviets, however, would like to keep trade and even technological and scientific informational trade at the same level that it is at now.

  • December 11, 1980

    Secret Telegram No. 3267/IV - From Beijing to Warsaw

    Czyrek reports that he is going to release an official remark in Poland in order to divert a “wedge” that China is trying to create between the Soviet Union and Poland.

  • December 18, 1980

    Secret Telegram No. 3638/IV - From Moscow to Warsaw

    Notes that the Chinese are pretending to sympathize with the Soviets, but are really trying to take advantage of the situation in Poland.

  • February 13, 1981

    Note on the Relations between China and Poland

    The Prime Ministers of both Poland and China wish to thank one another, and note that Poland can learn from China about the need for stability in forming socialism in their country. Though the Chinese have always been seen as sympathetic, some of their actions, however, do not always yield such positive results

  • November 16, 1981

    Sino-Soviet Trade, 1981

    Mongolian embassy official and Deputy Head of the USSR MFA meet to discuss Sino-Soviet relations. The latter notes that the Chinese have not had a change in their attitude or policy, so no positive changes can be expected. Issues related to trade, both physical, technical and scientific, are discussed.

  • 1982

    Entries from diary of CPSU International Department official Anatoly Chernyaev regarding Soviet policy toward China, summer and fall 1982