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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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Sino-Soviet Relations

This is a collection of primary source documents that discuss the Soviet-Chinese relationship during the Cold War. Composed largely of cables, memos, and telegrams, this collection spans the 1930s through 1959, or the period prior to the split. See also The Sino-Soviet Split, 1960-1984. (Image, Soviet propaganda poster, "Friends Forever.")

  • October 21, 1948

    Cable, Stalin [via Kuznetsov] to Mao Zedong [via Terebin]

    Kuznetsov (Stalin) tells Terebin (Andrei Orlov) that two planes will pick up Mao at an undetermined time to take him to Moscow.

  • November 21, 1948

    Cable, Mao to Stalin

    Mao asks to delay his trip to Moscow until December.

  • November 22, 1948

    Cable, Stalin to Mao Zedong

    Stalin agrees that Mao should postpone his visit to Moscow for a month.

  • December 30, 1948

    Cable, Mao Zedong to Stalin

    Mao details to Stalin the recent military operations the Communists have undertaken against the Guomindang army. The first is in the area of Suizhou, Huaiying, and the Huaihe River. The second is in Du Yuming. Mao states that once these operations are complete, he will depart for Moscow. Mao discusses future tactics against the Guomindang.

  • January 06, 1949

    Cable, Stalin to Mao Zedong [via Terebin]

    Stalin, through Terebin (Andrei Orlov), acknowledges that creating a democratic coalition government in China will take a significant amount of time. Stalin states, however, that it would be best if the final stages of the process take place sooner than the summer, the time Mao planned to have the government established.

  • January 08, 1949

    Cable, Mao Zedong to Stalin

    Mao thanks Stalin for sending over Ivan Kovalev to help with economic struggles in China. Mao asks for materials with which China may build railroads.

  • January 09, 1949

    Cable, Mao to Stalin

    Mao announces that he is ready to visit Moscow.

  • January 10, 1949

    Cable, Mao to Filippov [Stalin]

    Mao responds to Stalin's telegram from 6 January 1949. Mao states that any government the GMD may create will be of no influence, that the GMD army is diminished, and that soon the People's Liberation Army will be able to march south and capture several important provinces.

  • January 10, 1949

    Cable, Stalin to Mao Zedong, Nanjing Peace Proposal

    Stalin informs Mao that they received a note from the Chinese Nationalist government in Nanjing proposing that the Soviet government act as a mediator between the Nanjing government and the Chinese Communist Party in the termination of the ongoing civil war.

  • January 10, 1949

    Cable, Terebin to Stalin [via Kuznetsov]

    Mao, via Terebin, tells Stalin, via Kuznetsov, of his, Mao's, plans for the next few months. He will continue his meeting with the Central Committee for a few more days; afterward he will go to Moscow and will stay for a month, to discuss the various questions he has mapped out. Upon returning to China, Mao will attempt to finish off the Chinese Nationalist Party (GMD). Mao discusses how to do so. Terebin relays further conversations with Mao concerning whether or not Fu Zuoyi should be tried as a war criminal and the state of the war against the GMD.

  • January 11, 1949

    Cable, Stalin to Mao Zedong, Nanjing Peace Proposal

    Stalin further explains his strategy in dealing with the peace proposal received from the Chinese Nationalist Government in Nanjing.

  • January 13, 1949

    Cable, Terebin to Stalin [via Kuznetsov]

    Terebin states that Mao is firmly against mediation with the GMD and the USSR taking part in mediation talks with the GMD. Terebin states that if Mao cannot make it to Moscow by the end of January, he will most likely not go at all.

  • January 13, 1949

    Cable, Mao Zedong to Stalin, Nanjing Peace Proposal

    Mao responds to Stalin's telegrams regarding the Soviet response to the proposal for negotiations from the Chinese Nationalist government in Nanjing.

  • January 14, 1949

    Cable, Mao Zedong to Stalin, Nanjing Peace Proposal

    Mao informs Stalin that they published a list of conditions under which they would consider entering negotiations with the Chinese Nationalist Government in Nanjing.

  • January 14, 1949

    Cable, Stalin to Mao Zedong, Nanjing Peace Proposal

    Stalin responds to Mao's 11 January telegram rejecting the peace proposal from the Chinese Nationalist Goverment in Nanjing.

  • January 15, 1949

    Cable, Stalin to Mao Zedong, Nanjing Peace Proposal

  • January 17, 1949

    Cable, Mao Zedong to Filippov [Stalin]

    Mao states that he must delay his visit to Moscow once again. He gives an alternative, which is to have a member of the Politburo come to visit China instead.

  • January 18, 1949

    The Official Statement on the Soviet Government’s Answer to the Note by the Nanjing Government (Izyestia)

    The Soviet government rejects the proposal from the Chinese Nationalist Government in Nanjing for the Soviet Union to act as mediator in peace negotiations with the Chinese Communist Party.

  • January 30, 1949

    Memorandum of Conversation between Anastas Mikoyan and Mao Zedong

    Mao discusses the military situation in China, which he states is heavily in the favor of the CCP. Mao discusses the plans for finishing off the Guomindang forces, which are to be delayed a couple months. Mao discusses China's standing compared to Russia's. Mao discusses his own standing among the Soviet leaders.

  • January 31, 1949

    Notes by Anastas Mikoyan ahead of Meetings with Mao Zedong

    Notes taken by Minister of Foreign Trade Anastas Mikoyan during a meeting with Mao Zedong in Beijing. They discuss relations with the United States and other Western powers and the nationalization of foreign-owned factories in China. Mikoyan also gave advice on developing the new Communist government in China. Noteably, Mikoyan wrote that "the path of the regime of the people’s democracies, or the path of the Russian Soviet revolution, is not quite appropriate for China. China has its own path of development."