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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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Soviet Foreign Policy

Documents on the international relations and foreign policy of the Soviet Union. See also United States-Soviet Relations and the Warsaw Pact. (Image, Nixon and Khrushchev in Moscow, 1959, NARA RG306-RMN-1-21)

  • July 26, 1946

    Notes from Czechoslovak Government Meeting Detailing Discussion from a Previous Meeting with Stalin

    The notes chronicle topics discussed by Czechoslovak Minister of Foreign Affairs J. Masaryk with Stalin in Moscow, including: Czechoslovak-Polish relations, Czechoslovak-Hungarian relations, Czechoslovak business in Romania and trade with the Soviet Union. It ends with a resolution by the Czechoslovak government to achieve the goals set forth in the Moscow meeting.

  • October 31, 1946

    Report from Bulgarian Intelligence on the Situation in Austria, Switzerland, Italy, and France

    A report on the political climate in Western Europe and the activities of the Bulgarian communities abroad. The author concludes that since a new war seems imminent, the diplomatic and intelligence apparatus needs to be overhauled and old cadres dissmissed.

  • February 17, 1948

    Record of Conversation between I.V. Stalin and President of Hungary Zoltán Tildy in Moscow

    Stalin and Hungarian President Zoltán Tildy discuss the draft of the treaty of friendship, cooperation and mutual assistance between Hungary and the Soviet Union. They also discuss Hungarian relations with its neighbors, Romania and Czechoslovakia, and the internal situation in Hungary.

  • July 16, 1949

    From S. I. Kavtaradze's Diary: Record of Conversation with Gheorghiu-Dej about his Meeting with I. V. Stalin

    Gheorghiu-Dej describes his conversation with Stalin, in which they discussed Romanian economic development and the training of Romanian workers in the Soviet Union.

  • 1950

    Telegram from Gromyko to Stalin with a Resolution and Approved Telegram to Razuvaev

    Gromyko goes over the rules established in the Geneva Conference.

  • January 16, 1950

    Information at Bulgarian Plenum on Stalin's View on the Purges in the Bulgarian Communist Party

    Georgi Chankov and Vulko Chervenkov present a report before the BCP CC on their recent meeting with Joseph Stalin, Georgi Malenkov and Nikolai Bulganin in Moscow. Among the issues discussed were the ongoing purges in the BCP, the role of the Agrarian Movement in the government, the state of the Bulgarian armed forces and the Bulgarian industrial and agricultural production.

  • February 09, 1951

    Record of a Conversation between Stalin and representatives of the Indian Communist Party

    Meeting in Moscow between Stalin and Indian Communist Party representatives C. Rajeswara Rao, S. A. Dange, A. K. Ghosh, and [M. Basava] Punnaiah. Stalin responded to a series of prepared questions from the representatives.

  • September, 1952

    Resolution of the CPSU CC: On shortcomings in the treatment of the struggle for peace by the press

    Draft resolution of the CPSU CC [TzK VKPb] regarding the need to carry out political education with journalists, ensuring that the editorial staff understands correctly the struggle for peace led by the Soviet Union.

  • September 01, 1952

    Resolution of the Central Committee of the All-Union Communist Party (CC VKP(b))

    The draft resolution of the Central Committee of the All-Union Communist Party (bolshevik) (CC VKP(b)) printed below sharply criticized Soviet media that "inadequately mobilize Soviet people to raise their vigilance against the intrigues of imperialist aggressors" with "pacifist arguments," that ignore the "aggressive measures and plans" of imperialism, and neglect "Marxism-Leninist teaching on the character, sources and causes of war."

  • March 05, 1953

    CPSU CC Protocol, 'Record of Proceedings of the Joint Meeting of the CPSU Central Committee Plenum, the Council of Ministers of the Union of the SSR, and the Presidium of the Supreme Council of the USSR'

    This protocol concerns the meeting of the CPSU Presidium & Soviet Council of Ministers as Stalin was about to die.

  • March 18, 1953

    Draft Instructions for General Vasilii Chuikov and Vladimir Semyonov regarding GDR Control of Borders

    Draft instructions of the Soviet leadership to its representatives in East Germany, advising that the SED requests for East German control of the border with West Germany are "unacceptable and grossly simplistic."

  • April 18, 1953

    Memorandum from Ivan Turginov, 'On the Western Powers’ Policy regarding the German Question'

    Ivan Turginov reports on the policies of the Western powers on the German Question. Special emphasis is given to the public opinion in western countries with regard to Western and Soviet policies towards occupied Germany.

  • April 28, 1953

    Soviet Foreign Ministry Memorandum, 'Regarding Further Measures of the Soviet Government on the German Question'

    Memorandum on further issues regarding the German Question. The memorandum discusses further actions to be taken by the Soviet leadership in order to respond to developments in the Western controlled sectors of Germany and to increase Soviet influence with the German people.

  • May 02, 1953

    Memorandum from Vladimir Semyonov to Vyacheslav Molotov Evaluating the Prospects for a Successful Resolution of the German Question

    Memorandum to Soviet Foreign Minister Molotov on German reunification. The memorandum reviews the developments following the East German proposal of an "all German" conference and the Soviet proposal for a German peace treaty.

  • May 05, 1953

    Vladimir Semyonov, 'Memorandum on the German Question'

    Memorandum on Soviet policy regarding German unification including meetings with the United States, England, and France on an All-German Conference and need for future discussion. Also addressed is Soviet relations with East Germany in the forms of military assistance and economic aid for reparations.

  • May 08, 1953

    USSR Foreign Ministry Draft Memorandum, 'On Further Soviet Government Measures Pertaining to the German Question'

    Memorandum from the Soviet Foreign Affairs Ministry on Soviet foreign policy options with regard to the German Question. The memorandum looks at the effects on Soviet policy toward the western powers in the context of the Postdam conference and at the future state of the Soviet-East German relations.

  • May 24, 1953

    Sample Plan for the Draft Response to the Notes of the Three Powers

    Unhappy with the call for a conference in Lugano, this plan outlines several points that should be taken into consideration when drafting the official response including the Soviet awareness that any lack of results from this conference would result in blame being placed on the Soviet state and the dismissal of questions raised by the Soviet government in prior correspondence. The Soviets conclude that they should arrange the program of the conference in order to maximize the conferences effectiveness in resolving lingering post-war problems.

  • June 02, 1953

    Speech by Georgii M. Malenkov to a visiting government delegation from the German Democratic Republic (GDR)

    Malenkov discusses East and West Germany, arguing that failure to unify the two countries will lead to another world war. He argues that the "forced" building of socialism in East Germany is in fact an obstacle to reunification, proposing that a reunification will be possible "only on the basis that Germany will be a bourgeois-democratic republic."

  • July 01, 1953

    Letter from Lavrentiy Beria to Georgii Malenkov Reflecting on the Events of Spring 1953 (Excerpt)

    Letter from Beria to Malenkov discussing the events which took place in East Germany in the spring of 1953. Beria also discusses his actions after Stalin's death, asking for the forgiveness of the CPSU CC Politburo.

  • September 25, 1953

    Draft Instructions to Chuikov and Semyonov

    In March 1953, Moscow had declined Ulbricht’s request for tightening up the sector border in Berlin, then the major loophole in the SED leadership’s efforts to seal off East Germany. In the aftermath of the demonstrations and unrest in Berlin, the SED leadership apparently tried to reintroduce the idea of increased “border security” in Berlin. Eager to salvage whatever was left of its political position as a champion of German unity, Moscow again held such measures as politically “disadvantageous” and “unacceptable.” Certainly, the Kremlin was also aware of the continued widespread resentment among the Berlin and GDR population which made any more restrictive measures a risky undertaking. Instead, the Soviets urged the SED to increase its “fight against hostile elements” in West Berlin—an issue that would become more and more the focus of Soviet attitude on Berlin.