Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

No image found.

Soviet Foreign Policy

Documents on the international relations and foreign policy of the Soviet Union. See also United States-Soviet Relations and the Warsaw Pact. (Image, Nixon and Khrushchev in Moscow, 1959, NARA RG306-RMN-1-21)

  • January 08, 1974

    DECREE of the Secretariat of the CC CPSU - An Appeal to the Leaders of the PDPA Groups 'Parcham' and 'Khalq'

    This document illustrates Moscow's fear regarding the instability and infighting among Afghan political parties, and its corresponding consequences for Soviet involvement in the Middle East.

  • June 26, 1974

    Decree of the CPSU CC - Information for the Leaders of the Progressive Afghan Political Organizations 'Parcham' and 'Khalq' Concerning the Results of the Visit of Mohammed Daud to the USSR

    This document provides information for the leaders of the progressive Afghan political parties; and results of the CC elections.

  • June 04, 1976

    Agreement between the Czechoslovak and Soviet Ministries of the Interior on cooperation from the summer of 1976 until 1980

    This plan focuses on developing and strengthening bilateral ties between the two countries in the areas of science, technology, security operations and criminology. It also calls for the sharing of best practices of propaganda methods, roadway security and oversight, education of government officials and administrative organization of bureaus such as the Ministry of the Interior. Provisions are made to exchange methods designed to improve the systems of permit, passport and visa issuance and registration of aliens. The sharing of best practices to reduce alcohol abuse, vagrancy, recidivism and youth crime is discussed as well.

  • July 06, 1976

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    A lengthy report on the results of India Gandhi's visit to the Soviet Union drawn from news sources and conversations with Indian officials. The response is described as highly positive with an expectation of closer political and economic cooperation between the two countries in the future.

  • April 15, 1977

    Informational Note on the Meeting of the Representatives of International Departments of Six Fraternal Parties

    The CPSU, PUWP, SED, CPCz, HWSP, and BCP met to discuss an upcoming conference devoted to the discussion of the “Problems of Peace and Socialism.” China was another focus of the meeting, particularly the implications of the expansion of its industrial-military complex.

  • August 17, 1977

    Summary of the Meeting and Negotiations held by L. I. Brezhnev with N. Ceausescu in Crimea, on 5 August 1977

    Summary of a four hour meeting between Ceausescu and Brezhnev in Crimea, in which the two leaders discussed the Romanian position regarding several international problems. The emphasis of the discussion was the development and formation of the Moldavian nation, which Brezhnev claimed were incorrectly interpreted by contemporary Romanian scientific literature and press periodicals.

  • March, 1978

    Notes on Yasser Arafat's Visit to Moscow in March [1978]

    Notes on a meeting in Moscow from March 6-10 between Yasser Arafat & the PLO Delegation and the Soviet government. Arafat was met by Brezhnev, Boris Ponomarev and Andrei Gromyko. Among the issues discussed were the situation in the Middle East, the Soviets desire for Palestine to counter Egypt's "capitulation" to Israel and the U.S. (which Arafat affirmed), tensions in Southern Lebanon and the PLO's increasing desire to further cooperation with Syria and non-Christian Lebanese groups.

  • June 27, 1978

    Exposition of the Conversations with Cde. V. I. Potapov, Chief of the Romanian Sector of the CPSU CC

    Briefing given by V. I. Potapov on the dispute between the USSR and the SSR regarding the historical treatment of Soviet-Romanian relations. The SSR was accused of pursuing an independent foreign policy and offering a bad example for other socialist countries. Some issues examined were: the Romanian position in the Belgrade Negotiations, the RCP attitude towards “Eurocommunism," the Romanian position towards Africa, the Middle East and China and the Moldavian question.

  • October 27, 1978

    Conspect of Conversations with V. I. Potapov, Chief of Romanian Sector of CPSU CC Section

    V.I Potapov informs about a visit to Bucharest of the CPSU delegation led by A. A. Gromyko and the discussions regarding the “Bessarabian question,” criticism of the CPSU regarding RSR’s relations with the USA and NATO and independent relations with China, RSR’s distancing from the Soviet Union and the other socialist countries in terms of foreign policy.

  • November 14, 1978

    Notes on Yasser Arafat's Visit to Moscow in October 1978

    A synopsis of discussions between Moscow and PLO Leader Yasser Arafat that had occurred on October 29, 1978. The Russians expressed concern that Egyptian President Anwar Sadat has participated in peace agreements with Israel and the U.S. The Russians framed this as anti-Arab and assured Arafat that they supported Arafat and his "progressive" policies. The Soviet Union aligns itself firmly with the PLO and those in the Arab world that reject cooperation with the U.S. and Israel. Due to these discussions, the first joint Soviet-PLO communique was issued, which pleased the Palestinians.

  • November 24, 1978

    Security agreement between the Soviet KGB and the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic Ministry of the Interior from summer 1978 - 1980

    The two parties set forth their joint security strategy to manage perceived threats to state authority from the summer of 1978 through 1980. They agree to work with broadcast stations, including Radio Free Europe, to ensure they are not subversive stations and to use Czechoslovak students as agents against subversive radio stations. The parties highlight the importance of fighting Zionist and Trotskyist organizations, and make plans to cooperate to infiltrate organizations, including Jewish religious groups, that may have been infiltrated by these organizations. KGB and Czechoslovak security officials pledge to cooperate in monitoring and infiltrating international communist groups and reactionary church groups, including some associated with the Vatican, in order to detect and foil potential upcoming actions against the Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia and other socialist countries. Foreign religious groups active in Czechoslovakia and the Soviet Union, such as Jehovah's Witnesses and Seventh-day Adventists, are mentioned as potentially anti-state. Both parties agree to cooperate in order to frustrate attempts by anti-socialist parties in Czechoslovak to connect with anti-state dissidents in the Soviet Union and share information on new forms of fighting actions of anti-socialist individuals. To combat ideological diversion, the parties decide to promote scientific and cultural exchanges between the two countries. The Soviet and Czechoslovak delegates decide to implement counter-intelligence and anti-ideological diversion measures at prominent international events such as the 1980 Summer (Moscow) and Winter (Lake Placid) Olympic Games and international film festivals, exhibitions and fairs to be held in the Soviet Union. Both parties agree to monitor extremist and terrorist groups, youth organizations in East Germany, France, England and the United States and Kurdish students studying in Europe.

  • December 08, 1978

    Cooperative plan between the Interior Ministry of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the KGB of the Soviet Union from the summer of 1979-1981

    The parties agree to assist one another in the collection of intelligence information on political, economic, scientific and technical matters and exchange information on suspicious contacts of Czechoslovak and Soviet citizens suspected to be spies or subversive. Both agree to the exchange of counter-intelligence regarding Czechoslovak and Soviet citizens working in scientific organizations and international exhibitions, fairs and congresses. Steps are outlined to protect railroad cargo using troops from Warsaw Pact states, prevent eavesdropping of telecommunications and detect and prevent foreign terrorist attacks on Czechoslovak and Soviet airplanes and anti-socialist interruption of international trucking lines. Special mention is made of multiple international transportation organizations that need to be monitored. Information-sharing procedures are agreed to for commercial and industrial firms, banks, scientific centers and international scientific organizations.

  • March 21, 1979

    Telegram No. 66, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry on Soviet Premier Kosygin's visit to India

    A summary of the results of Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin's visit to India. Discussions touched upon Soviet-Indian economic relations and a request by the Indians for Soviet arms.

  • April 01, 1979

    Memo on Protocol #149 of the Politburo, "Our future policy in connection with the situation in Afghanistan"

    The following CPSU Central Committee document, dated 1 April 1979 and signed by Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko, Defense Minister Dmitrii Ustinov, KGB chief Yurii Andropov, and CC International Department head Boris Ponomarev, provides a strikingly candid assessment of the deteriorating situation in Afghanistan that the Soviet Politburo confronted in spring 1979. The report attributes the increasing success of the Islamic opposition (i.e., the Afghan Mujaheddin) to the “miscalculations and mistakes” of the PDPA (People’s Democratic Party of Afghanistan) regime that seized power following the April 1978 “revolution.”

  • May 16, 1979

    Conspect of Conversations with Cde. V. I. Potapov, Head of the Romania Sector of the CPSU CC Section

    V.I Potapov informs on foreign and domestic policies of the Romanian leadership, including the education of the population in a nationalist and anti-Russian spirit, publications describing Russo-Romanian and Soviet-Romanian relations regarding Moldova, the anti-Soviet course of the Romanian leadership abroad, including the pursuit of separate relations with China. Soviet representatives claim that Ceausescu is the principal animator of the RCP’s separate course, which he wishes to use to consolidate his power.

  • August 20, 1979

    Information Regarding the Meeting and Conversation in the Crimea of L. I. Brezhnev with N. Ceausescu, on 1 August 1979

    V.I Potapov informs on the discussion between Brezhnev and Ceausescu in Crimea in 1979. The Soviets are worried about the separate course followed by the RCP leadership with regards to domestic and international issues. Topics involve the Soviet criticism of the publications of the SRR regarding the Moldavian “territorial question”, the attitude of the Romanian leaders towards the Warsaw Treaty Organization, and towards the Chinese problem.

  • October 18, 1979

    Transcript of CPSU CC Politburo Meeting (excerpt), 18 October 1979

    [Excerpt] Transcript of CPSU CC Politburo Meeting regarding telegrams from Cuba regarding the attitudes of SWAPO men and Angolans towards the Cubans and fighting. The Politburo members also discussed Sino-Soviet relations, Cuban sugar sales, and Soviet cooperation with Spain.

  • December 27, 1979

    CPSU CC Memo with attachments, 27 December 1979, on Politburo Protocol #177

    The memo concerns Soviet steps on ties with the development of the situation around Afghanistan.

  • March 11, 1980

    Letter to the Chairman of the Social Democratic Party of Germany, Chairman of the Socialist International, Willy Brandt

    A letter from Brezhnev to Willy Brandt before their meeting in Madrid. Discusses detente and the disarmament.

  • March 14, 1980

    CPSU CC Resolution, 14 March 1980

    This resolution and the attached documents give the plans for future Soviet cooperation with the Sandinista National Liberation Front in Nicaragua.