Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

No image found.

Soviet Invasion of Czechoslovakia

Documents on the 1968 Prague Spring in Czechoslovakia and the Soviet invasion in response. The documents are from various sources, but the bulk of them come from the Central State Archive of Social Organizations of Ukraine. Mostly comprised of reports, notes, and memorandums, the growing unrest in Czechoslovakia is discussed, along with border control problems, and the Warsaw Pact's eventual military intervention. See also the Warsaw Pact. (Image, tanks in Prague)

  • June 06, 1968

    P. Shelest Reports on Miloš Krno's Evaluation of the Czechoslovak Crisis

    P. Shelest reports to the CPSU CC on Slovak writer Miloš Krno's evaluation of events in Czechoslovakia.

  • June 08, 1968

    Report on and Translation of the Appeal of Action Committee for a Democratic and Socialist Czechoslovakia

    P. Shelest provides a translation of a subversive document from Czechoslovakia.

  • June 17, 1968

    Memorandum from P. Shelest to CPSU CC

    First Secretary of the Ukrainian Communist Party Shelest reports on the vist of a delegation of workers from Czechoslovakia to Ukraine. There was much discussion of the ongoing Prague Spring, including criticism of the Soviet Union from some delegation members.

  • July 10, 1968

    Memorandum from P. Shelest to CPSU CC

    First Secretary of the Ukrainian Communist Party Shelest reports on a conversation between the Ukrainian secretary of the Transcarpathian Oblast with the first secretary of Czechoslovakia's East Slovakia regional committee. They discussed possible changes to Czechoslovakia's federal structure and Soviet concerns about the ongoing Prague Spring.

  • July 17, 1968

    Speech by P. Shelest at the CPSU CC Plenum

    First Secretary of the Ukrainian Communist Party Petro Shelest speaks at a CPSU Plenum on the situation in Czechoslovakia, characterizing the Prague Spring as "a grave, right-wing opportunist danger in a fraternal Communist party and the growth of anti-socialist, counterrevolutionary forces in socialist Czechoslovakia."

  • July 18, 1968

    Report, P. Shelest to Communist Party of Ukraine Central Committee

    Report delivered by First Secretary Petro Shelest to an expanded meeting of the Ukrainian Communist Party Central Committee and the Kyiv Oblast committee on 18 July 1968. A CPSU Central Committee plenum had been held the previous day to endorse the Soviet delegation’s decisions at a multilateral meeting in Warsaw on the Prague Spring.

  • July 21, 1968

    Shelest's Account of His Secret Meeting on Lake Balaton with Vasil Bil'ak, 20-21 July 1968

    Excerpt from diary of the First Secretary of the Ukrainian Communist Party, Petro Shelest. Shelest recounts his secret meeting with the Slovak Communist Party leader, Vasil Bil'ak, on the shore of Lake Balaton in Hungary. The meeting took place late in the evening of 20-21 July, exactly a month before the Soviet-led invasion of Czechoslovakia.

  • July 22, 1968

    Memorandum from P. Shelest to CPSU CC, On Czechoslovak Delegation's Visit to Ukraine

    First Secretary of the Ukrainian Communist Party, Petro Shelest, reports on the visit of a delegation from Czechslovakia to Chernihiv oblast in northern Ukraine. During the visit, delegation members and Ukrainian officials argue about the Prague Spring and whether the democratization process at work was a positive force or a threat allowing anti-socialist elements an active role in Czechslovak society.

  • July 24, 1968

    P. Shelest Reports on a Meeting Between Ukrainian and Slovak Party Officials

    Petro Shelest reports to the CC CPSU on a meeting between Cde. V. G. Dykusarov and a secretary of the KSC’s East Slovakia regional committee, Cde. Jaromír Hetteš. Cde. J. Koscelanský, who usually appears on behalf of the Slovaks, was on vacation.

  • August, 1968

    Letter from Czech Communist Politicians to Brezhnev Requesting Soviet Intervention in Prague Spring

    In August 1968 a small group of pro-Moscow hardliners in the Czechoslovak Communist Party, led by Vasil Bilak, wrote two letters requesting urgent assistance from the Soviet Union to thwart the imminent "counterrevolution" in Czechoslovakia. Both letters were addressed to Leonid Brezhnev, the general secretary of the Soviet Communist Party (CPSU), and both were written in Russian to ensure that they would be read promptly. The first (and more important) letter was signed by Bilak and four of his colleagues: Drahomir Kolder, Alois Indra, Oldrich Svestka, and Antonin Kapek. Brezhnev later used the letter as a formal justification for the impending military invasion of Czechoslovakia.

  • August 20, 1968

    Secret Decree of the Council of Ministers of the PR of Bulgaria for the Participation of Bulgarian Troops in the Warsaw Pact Operation in Czechoslovakia

  • August 21, 1968

    Letter from the Central Committees of the Bulgarian, East German, Hungarian, Polish, and Soviet Communist Parties regarding the Warsaw Pact intervention in Czechoslovakia

    Letter from the Central Committees of the Communist Parties of East Germany, Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria and the Soviet Union explaining the need for intervention in Czechoslovakia. The letter lays out the rationale behind the Brezhnev Doctrine.

  • August 24, 1968

    Telegrams from Romanian Embassy, Beijing, to Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 22-24 August 1968

    A series of three telegrams reporting on a reception held at the Romanian Embassy in Beijing on August 23, 1968. Premier Zhou Enlai attended the event and gave a speech condemning the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia.

  • August 29, 1968

    P. Shelest Reports on Informer Activity in the Ukraine

    P. Shelest submit a summary of informer reports for the CC CPSU on people who have "expressed unsavory views about events in the CSSR."

  • August 30, 1968

    P. Shelest Writes to the CC CPSU on a Radio Liberty Broadcast

    P. Shelest writes a letter about an appeal in Ukrainian broadcast on Radio Liberty regarding the troubles in Czechoslovakia.

  • September 03, 1968

    P. Shelest on Romanian Reactions to the Unrest in Czechoslovakia

    P. Shelest reports on observations by small delegations of Ukrainian workers to Romania.

  • September 03, 1968

    Note Number 291 from the Department of Asia-Oceania, 'China and the Events in Czechoslovakia'

    The Department of Asia-Oceania analyzes shifts in Chinese foreign policy toward Eastern Europe following the Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968 and connects the apparent changes in Beijing's diplomacy to the Sino-Soviet split and the Vietnam War.

  • September 18, 1968

    Report on and Copy of Pro-Czech Propaganda in the Ukraine

    Report on and transcript of an anonymous propaganda leaflet found among Ukrainian students, on the situation in Czechoslovakia.

  • September 30, 1968

    Gen. Djurov’s Report on the participation of Bulgarian troops in the Warsaw Pact operation in Czechoslovakia, 30 September 1968

    The Minister reports on the progress of the allied operation and on the strength of the Czech resistance.

  • October 11, 1968

    Stenogram of a Session of the Bureau of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Moldavia

    Discussion in the Moldavian Communist Party Central Committee on the effects of Romanian mass media on the Moldavian population following the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia