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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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Cuban Foreign Relations

 Documents on Cuban's international relations, focusing on its relationship with the Soviet Union, China and the United States. See also the Cuban Missile Crisis. (Image, Zhou Enlai and Che, 1965)

  • June 13, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 13 June 1962

    Rapacki asks for more information on the rumor regarding equipping the FRG (Federal Republic of Germany) with atomic weapons.

  • June 13, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 13 June 1962

    Rapacki reports on a meeting with the ORI [Organizaciones Revolucionarias Integradas], including: Fidel Castro, Raul Castro, [President Osvaldo] Dorticos [Torrado], Blas Roca, [and Emilio] Aragones [Navarro]. They discussed general issues of coordinating sugar trade, agricultural policy, policies toward the church, diplomatic visits, and the most current topic of the Escalante affair.

  • June 15, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 15 June 1962

    Rapacki discusses the interplay between Cuba, Poland and the FRG (Federal Republic of Germany) in regards to their diplomatic relations with one another.

  • June 22, 1962

    From the Diary of Ye. I. Pronskiy, Record of a Conversation with University of Havana Instructor, Anastacio Cruz Mancilla, 29 May 1964

    Mancilla, instructor of many Cuban leadership members including Ernesto Che Guevara, Carlos Rafael Rodriguez, Augusto Martinez Sanchez, and other advisors of Dortico, evaluates the political and economic views of his (former) students. He focuses primarily on Guevara.

  • June 25, 1962

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Beck), Report on Talk with Cuban President Osvaldo Dorticos on 15 June 1962

    In a top secret report, Hungarian Ambassador to Cuba János Beck describes a recent meeting with Cuban President Osvaldo Dorticos. Beck divides the conversation among five categories—agriculture, industry, central planning, counter-revolutionary activities, and the party. Dorticos reports improvements and obstacles (e.g. agricultural production is developing, though slowly, and the growth of the party remains in its initial stages of formation).

  • July 12, 1962

    Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Presidium Protocol 41

    Protocol 41 details a meeting on a group of economic advisers sent to Cuba from the Soviet Union.

  • August 23, 1962

    Soviet Report on American Attempts at Disseminating Fabricated News on Cuba

    Report on the American effort to spread false rumors about the arrival of Soviet military equipments and personnel in Cuba. To counter this subversive attempt, the Cuban security organs has established full control of foreign correspondence and captured maps and intelligence reports.

  • September 01, 1962

    Telegram from Mexican Embassy, Havana

    A telegram from the Mexican Embassy in Cuba describing the incorrect facts that have been reported by the press lately, regarding commercial maritime traffic between Cuba and other socialist countries and counterrevolutionary forces.

  • September, 1962

    Decision to Send a Group of Bulgarian Experts to Cuba

    Ivan Prumov , Minister of Agriculture, and Ivan Abadzhiev, First Secretary of the Central Committee of Dimitrov Communist Youth Union (DCYU) address Cuba’s request for young specialists in agriculture (e.g. agronomists, technicians, gardeners). The Bulgarian government agrees to send specialists who will work and live in a State Agrarian Cooperative. The Ministry of Agriculture and Central Committee of DCYU are responsible to send and assist 76 agriculture specialists to Cuba.

  • September 02, 1962

    Note from Cuban Ambassador to Bulgaria, Salvador Garcia Aguero, to Bulgarian Foreign Minister, 2 September 1962

    Warning about the content of Castro’s declaration with regard to US threats against Cuba. Reference to the media and other authorities copies of the declaration.

  • September 07, 1962

    Telegram of Soviet Ambassador to Cuba A.I. Alekseev to the USSR Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    Alekseev sends a report on the nature of anti-Cuban propaganda and actions taken by the American government in United States and Latin America

  • September 11, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to Cuba Alekseev to the USSR MFA

    Alekseev reports on a conversation with Raul Castro where Castro reinforces the strength of the Soviet-Cuban relationship.

  • September 12, 1962

    Letter from Dutch Embassy, Havana (Boissevain), 12 September 1962

    A letter from Gideon Boissevain, the Dutch Ambassador to Cuba reporting to Amsterdam. The letter primarily concerns the press coverage in Cuba of the rising crisis. Particular attention is paid to the Soviet guarantees of Cuban security and the American responses to the discovered missiles. In Cuba there is fear of an invasion by the United States making use of foreign legionnaires, despite Kennedy's claims there is no plan for an attack on Cuba.

  • September 14, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 14 September 1962

    Jelen discusses a conversation he had with [Foreign Minister Raúl] Roa [García] on 9 September. They discussed diplomatic visits, UN delegation sessions, and growing tensions in the 'Cuban situation' and possible US military action against Cuba.

  • September 21, 1962

    Letter from Dutch Embassy, Havana (Boissevain), 21 September 1962

    In this letter to Amsterdam, Dutch Ambassador to Cuba Boissevain remarks on how the American blockade of Cuba can effect Dutch trade in the Caribbean. He compares the situation to the one faced Japan and the Yellow Sea in the early 20th Century: Japanese control of the sea north of Shanghai strangled international shipping, and the British Navy was unable (or unwilling) to keep the Japanese in check. Boissevain decries the blockade of Cuba as foolhardy and says Washington risks losing the support of NATO over this.

  • September 22, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 22 September 1962

    Jelen compiles this report from his conversation with the USSR Ambassador [Aleksandr] Alekseyev. Alekseyev believes that the Soviet declaration from the 11th removed the danger of more serious [US] military action [against Cuba]. At the same time, he takes into account the possibility of the attempts of staging subversive landings, as well as the possibility of activities [carried out] by Cuban emigrant pirates against the ships. The two also discuss economic aid to Cuba, especially in the form of foodstuffs.

  • September 25, 1962

    Report on meeting between the Mexican representative at the Organization of American States (OAS) and the Czechoslovak Ambassador in Washington about US-Cuban tensions over Guantanamo

    According to the Director General and the Czechoslovak Ambassador, the tensions between the U.S. and Cuba stem mostly from the violation of Cuban airspace by airplanes coming from Guantanamo and that the American airplanes had fired machine guns over Cuban territory. The Czechoslovakian Ambassador also reported that the Cuban troops were "in trenches."

  • September 28, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 28 September 1962

    Jelen discusses a call he received from Foreign Minister Raúl Roa [García] regarding President Osvaldo Dorticós' statement to be made during the general debate of the next UN session. He also says that the "Cuban question has gained much attention" and that "currently there was no danger of [US] military aggression against Cuba."

  • September 29, 1962

    Italian Communist Journalist Carmine De Lepsis, Interview with Ernesto “Che” Guevara, Havana

    In an interview with journalist Carmine De Lepsis, Che Guevara discusses the future development of the Cuban economy, the improvement in productivity and the establishment of new labor laws, dealing with the exodus of technicians, and in general part of the lower middle class, and compares the situation in Cuba to Latin America in general.

  • October 04, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to the USA Anatoly F. Dobrynin to the USSR Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    Dobrynin sends the results of a meeting between Rusk, himself and the Foreign Ministers of Latin American countries where they discussed questions of security, trade, and the question of the Cuban government in exile.