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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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United States-Soviet Relations

 Documents on the often adversarial relationship between the United States and the Soviet Union during the Cold War. The majority of the documents are reports, telegrams, and memorandums that come from Russian archives. Many topics are covered, including the "German Question," the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Ethiopian Civil War, Jimmy Carter's presidency, and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. (Image, Reagan Gorbachev on Governor's Island, 1988, Reagan Presidential Library, C50846-27)

  • August, 1941

    Report by Vyshinsky to Molotov Concerning Trade and Economic Cooperation Between the Soviet Union and the United States

    Report by Vyshinsky to Molotov concerning trade and economic cooperation between the Soviet Union and the United States, August 1941

  • May 29, 1944

    Telegram from Nikishov to Beria - Henry A. Wallace’s visit to the city of Magadan

    Ivan Nikishov reports to NKVD Commissar Beria on Vice President Henry Wallace's activities while visiting Magadan, Siberia in 1944.

  • June 06, 1944

    Telegram from Nikishov to Beria - Henry A. Wallace’s visit to the city of Magadan

    Telegram from Ivan Nikishov, to NKVD Commissar Beria. Nikishov reports on a visit by US Vice President Henry A. Wallace, who toured the Soviet Far East in May 1944. Nikishov was the Head of Dalstroi, the "Far North Construction Trust," part of the Soviet Gulag system which oversaw mining using forced labor in the Russian Far East. Nikishov quotes a number of positive comments from Wallace, as well as questions he had about Dalstroi's operations, such as the total quantity of gold mined.

  • July 05, 1944

    Telegram from Nikishov to Beria - Wallace's Goodbye Message

    Telegram from Ivan Nikishov, to NKVD Commissar Beria. Nikishov reports on Vice President Henry Wallace's goodbye message after completing his visit to the Soviet Far East in May 1944.

  • September 27, 1946

    Telegram from Nikolai Novikov, Soviet Ambassador to the US, to the Soviet Leadership

    Soviet Ambassador to the US, Nikolai Novikov, describes the advent of a more assertive US foreign policy. Novikov cautions the Soviet leadership that the Truman administration is bent on imposing US political, military and economic domination around the world. This telegram has, since its discovery in the Russian archives, been labelled the Soviet equivalent of US Ambassador to the Soviet Union George Kennan's "Long telegram."

  • December 09, 1950

    Resolution of the CPSU Politburo with Approved Article Draft for Pravda

    It was decided that the article "Concerning the joint statement of Truman and Attlee" be published in the Russian newspaper"Pravda."

  • March 18, 1953

    Draft Instructions for General Vasilii Chuikov and Vladimir Semyonov regarding GDR Control of Borders

    Draft instructions of the Soviet leadership to its representatives in East Germany, advising that the SED requests for East German control of the border with West Germany are "unacceptable and grossly simplistic."

  • April 18, 1953

    Memorandum from Ivan Turginov, 'On the Western Powers’ Policy regarding the German Question'

    Ivan Turginov reports on the policies of the Western powers on the German Question. Special emphasis is given to the public opinion in western countries with regard to Western and Soviet policies towards occupied Germany.

  • June 13, 1953

    Cable 5321, from Ambassador Reber in Bonn to US State, Washington

    Cable from Samuel Reber to U.S. Department of State Outlining U.S. Perspectives on Four-Power Talks

  • September 25, 1953

    Draft Instructions to Chuikov and Semyonov

    In March 1953, Moscow had declined Ulbricht’s request for tightening up the sector border in Berlin, then the major loophole in the SED leadership’s efforts to seal off East Germany. In the aftermath of the demonstrations and unrest in Berlin, the SED leadership apparently tried to reintroduce the idea of increased “border security” in Berlin. Eager to salvage whatever was left of its political position as a champion of German unity, Moscow again held such measures as politically “disadvantageous” and “unacceptable.” Certainly, the Kremlin was also aware of the continued widespread resentment among the Berlin and GDR population which made any more restrictive measures a risky undertaking. Instead, the Soviets urged the SED to increase its “fight against hostile elements” in West Berlin—an issue that would become more and more the focus of Soviet attitude on Berlin.

  • July 12, 1955

    Central Committee Plenum of the CPSU Ninth Session, Concluding Word by Com. N. S. Krushchev

    Khrushchev responds to the accusations raised by Cde. Molotov about the state of Soviet foreign policy. He discusses the Soviet relationship with the Yugoslav leadership, the Austrian treaty, Soviet-US relations.

  • December 28, 1956

    Third World Reaction to Hungary and Suez, 1956: A Soviet Foreign Ministry Analysis

    Tugarinov wrote this overview of reactions to the events in Hungary and Suez by third world nations. Tugarinov reports that the events in Hungary and the Near East increased the prestige of the United States.

  • June 24, 1957

    Minutes of the Meeting of the CPSU CC Plenum on the State of Soviet Foreign Policy

    The Soviet leadership discusses the state of Soviet foreign policy after the Hungarian crisis and Khrushchev’s visit to the US. Molotov criticizes Khrushchev for recklessness in foreign policy direction. Soviet inroads in the Middle East and the Third World are analyzed. The effects of the crises in Eastern Europe are placed in the context of the struggle against US imperialism.

  • December 10, 1957

    Letter, Nikolai Bulganin to Dwight D. Eisenhower

    Bulganin proposes a halt on nuclear tests among the United States, the Soviet Union, and the United Kingdom beginning on January 1, 1958.

  • January 12, 1958

    Letter, Dwight D. Eisenhower to Nikolai Bulganin

  • October 16, 1959

    US State Department Translations, Comunist Party of the Soviet Union Central Committee, No. P251/14, Documents regarding the application of US national Lee Harvey Oswald for Soviet Citizenship

    Lee Harvey Oswald's 1959 application for Soviet citizenship and the Soviet Union's Central Committee recommendations and reports regarding the application.

  • November 27, 1959

    US State Department Translation, Communist Party of the Soviet Union Central Committee, no.3471-sh, 'Resolution of the CC CPSU Regarding the Application of US National Lee Harvey Oswald for Soviet Citizenship'

    Telegram from Gromyko, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the USSR, to CC CPSU advising that Lee Harvey Oswald be granted temporary sojourn in the USSR for one year and to provide him employment and housing. The Resolution includes specifics of employment and housing.

  • June 07, 1960

    Note from KGB Chairman A. Shelepin to Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, Regarding Plan to Discredit CIA Chief Dulles

    Shelepin sets out a plan to discredit CIA chief Allen Dulles.

  • August 03, 1960

    Note from USSR Embassy to the USA Relayed by Gromyko to Khrushchev, 'John Fitzgerald Kennedy - Political Character Sketch'

    Andrei Gromyko forwards to Premier Khrushchev a political profile, prepared by the USSR Embassy in Washington, of the recently-nominated Democratic presidential candidate, Senator John F. Kennedy.

  • October 10, 1960

    Dictated by Cde. N. S. Khrushchev on 10 October 1960

    Khrushchev reports on the proceedings at the United Nations in New York and his delegation's travel plans for returning to Moscow. He mentions his approval of plans to purchase buildings in New York for Ukrainian and Belorussian missions to the UN. He also suggests that they purchase an American car to bring back for the benefit of Soviet auto designers. He concludes with criticisms of the United States and New York.