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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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United States-Soviet Relations

 Documents on the often adversarial relationship between the United States and the Soviet Union during the Cold War. The majority of the documents are reports, telegrams, and memorandums that come from Russian archives. Many topics are covered, including the "German Question," the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Ethiopian Civil War, Jimmy Carter's presidency, and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. (Image, Reagan Gorbachev on Governor's Island, 1988, Reagan Presidential Library, C50846-27)

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister V.V. Kuznetsov to USSR Foreign Ministry

    Kuznetsov sends the results of a meeting between Castro and U Thant, regarding UN representatives, the blockade and U Thant’s report to the UN.

  • November 01, 1962

    Coded telegram from Soviet official Georgy Zhukov

    Zhukov relays the message that John F. Kennedy sent, via Salinger, that the President needed proof that the weapons in Cuba were dismantled.

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from USSR Foreign Minister A.A. Gromyko to the Soviet Mission in New York

    Instructions to the Soviet Mission in New York on negotiations with the UN, especially on the issues of the dismantling of weapons, American bases in Turkey, lifting the blockade and the composition of the group of Security Council agents.

  • November 01, 1962

    Mikoyan Cable to Central Committee of the CPSU about his conversation with US Permanent Representative to the UN Stevenson

    Mikoyan reported his conversation with US Representative to the UN Stevenson. The issues discussed include: An American non-aggression commitment against Cuba, the removal of the "quarantine", the methods for control of dismantling and dispatching of missiles, the normalization of relations between the US and their Latin American allies with Cuba, the liquidation of the US base in Guantanamo, the US proposal to remove ground-air missiles from Cuba, and the preliminary agreement between the US and the USSR over the issues to be discussed by the Security Council.

  • November 01, 1962

    Soviet Record of 1 November1962 Dinner conversation between CPSU CC Politburo Member A.I. Mikoyan and White House envoy John McCloy and US Ambassador to the UN Adlai Stevenson

    Mikoyan talks with Stevenson and McCloy about the rate of dismantling weapons in Cuba, asked when the Americans would lift the quarantine, as they promised to do so and poses the question of American presence in Guantanamo Bay. The U.S. side says all will be fulfilled once the dismantling of weapons is over.

  • November 02, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to Cuba A.I. Alekseev to USSR Foreign Ministry

    Alekseev discusses the response of Castro and Dorticos to certain documents.

  • November 02, 1962

    Telegram from USSR Foreign Minster A. Gromyko to unidentified recipient

    The U.S. allows Soviet ships to arrive at Cuba for the hastening of the removal process.

  • November 02, 1962

    Telegram from A.I. Mikoyan in New York to CC CPSU (2)

    Mikoyan discusses a meeting with McCloy and Stevenson where the two say that they approve of lifting the blockade for Soviet ships in order to speed up the removal process.

  • November 02, 1962

    Telegram from A.I. Mikoyan in New York to CC CPSU (1)

    Mikoyan discusses statements made by McCloy concerning dismantling of weapons and U.S. flyovers in Cuba.

  • November 02, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Envoy G. Zhukov to CC CPSU

    Soviet envoy to the UN, G. Zhukov, reports to the Soviet leadership on his discussion with US diplomat John McCloy. The US diplomat said that the US hoped the U2 spy plane pictures taken the day before will show that the withdrawal of Soviet Missiles was proceeding as agreed. Provided that progress was made on the issue of Cuba, further cooperation between the two superpowers was possible, including an agreement on an atmospheric test ban and on the militarization of the outer space.

  • November 02, 1962

    Telegram from A.I. Mikoyan to CC CPSU re 1 November 1962 meeting with Stevenson

    Mikoyan discusses the results of a meeting with Stevenson. The two discussed the quarantine in Cuba, the dismantling of weapons, the possibility of the Soviets and Americans coming to agreements over the issues to be discussed by the UN Security Council and the possibility of normalization of relations with Cuba in the future.

  • November 02, 1962

    Cable of V.V. Kuznetsov on 1 November 1962 conversation between CPSU CC Politburo Member A.I. Mikoyan and acting UN Secretary General U Thant

    Kuznetsov relays the results of a conversation between Mikoyan and U Thant. The bulk of the conversation between the two concerns U Thant’s recent visit to Cuba and his conversation with Castro. Mikoyan stresses lifting the quarantine around Cuba.

  • November 03, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister V.V. Kuznetsov and Ambassador to the UN V.A. Zorin to USSR Foreign Ministry

    The number and location of U.S. ships, along with International Red Cross and UN observers, in and around Cuba.

  • November 03, 1962

    Notes of Conversation between A.I. Mikoyan and Fidel Castro

    Soviet Ambassador to Cuba Alexeev reports on the conversation between Mikoyan and Fidel Castro. The Cuban leader expresses his disappointment that the Cuban leadership was not consulted on the issue of withdrawing Soviet weapons from Cuba and on the Cuban Missile Crisis in general, and emphasizes the negative impact it has had and confusion it has caused on the Cuban people.

  • November 04, 1962

    Telegram from USSR Foreign Minister Gromyko to Deputy Foreign Minister Kuznetsov and Ambassador to the UN Zorin in New York

    Gromyko sends instructions to Kuznetsov and Zorin to relay to Stevenson concerning the definition of “offensive weaponry.”

  • November 04, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to Cuba A.I. Alekseev to USSR Foreign Ministry

    Alekseev sends the results of a meeting with Cuban leadership, the Cubans were expressing discontent because of the fact that Soviet government had not consulted them on a number of issues.

  • November 05, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to the USA Dobrynin to USSR Foreign Ministry (1)

    Dobrynin discusses an article in the “Washington Post,” concerning the Soviet Union, that appears to have received information directly from Robert Kennedy.

  • November 05, 1962

    Telegram from USSR Foreign Minister Gromyko to Mikoyan and Alekseev in Havana

    Response to Alekseev’s telegram regarding Fidel Castro’s doubts as to the Khrushchev-Kennedy exchange of letters.

  • November 05, 1962

    Telegram (No.4448) from the Minister of the USSR Merchant Fleet to Captain of Ship "Amata" via Soviet ambassador in Havana (Alekseev

    Bakaev gives instructions to the captain of the “Amata,” regarding the UN representatives to be lodged on the ship.

  • November 05, 1962

    Gromyko Cable to Kuznetsov and Zorin in New York

    Gromyko cable to Kuznetsov and Zorin in New York regarding preparation for International Red Cross' inspection of the Soviet ship "Amata", the number of observers on each vessel, division of the inspection cost, the duration of IRC inspection, and Soviet acceptance to let IRC observers inspect Soviet ships bound for Cuba.