Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

June 10, 1986

MEMORANDUM OF THE TWO-DAY MEETING BETWEEN THE TWO KOREAN NATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEES AND THE INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEE ON JUNE 10-11, 1986

CITATION SHARE DOWNLOAD
  • Citation

    get citation

    Memorandum of negotiations between the NOCs of the Republic of Korea and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and the IOC in Lausanne from June 10-11, 1986.
    "Memorandum of the Two-Day Meeting between the Two Korean National Olympic Committees and the International Olympic Committee on June 10-11, 1986" June 10, 1986, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, International Olympic Committee Archives (Switzerland), SEOUL’ 88/ 3EME REUNION DES DEUX COREES +ACCRED, DE PRESSE 1986. Obtained for NKIDP by Sergey Radchenko. http://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/110007
  • share document

    http://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/110007

VIEW DOCUMENT IN

ENGLISH (TRANSCRIPTION) HTML

MEETING BETWEEN DELEGATIONS OF THE NOCS OF THE REPUBLIC OF KOREA AND OF THE DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF KOREA HELD UNDER THE AEGIS OF THE INTERNATIONAL OYLMPIC COMMITTEE – Lausanne, 10th-11th June 1986

Tuesday, 10th June 1986

THE PRESIDENT opened the meeting at 10.05 hours, welcoming the delegations from the NOCs of the Republic of Korea and of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (see annex 1) to Lausanne for their third joint meeting with the IOC. Delegates representing the IOC were as follows :

Mr. Alexandru SIPERCO, 1st Vice-President (Roumania)

Mr. Ashwini KUMAR, 2nd Vice-President (India)

Mr. Berthold BEITZ, 3rd Vice-President (Federal Republic of Germany)

Mr. Raymond GAFNER, Administrator délégué of the IOC

Mr. Simuel PISAR, IOC lawyer and adviser.

Mr. Howard STUPP, Director of legal affairs

Mr. Alain COUPAT, Chief of the [illegible]

THE PRESIDENT declared that he was certain that all parties would strive to reach a positive and mutually satisfactory agreement for the benefit of the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad in 1988; he stressed that the IOC’s position remained stable, and aimed to secure maximum NOC participation at the Games.

He briefly outlined the programme for the two-day meeting, explaining that this short gathering of all parties would be followed by a meeting between the IOC and the delegation from the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. At 15.00 hours, the Republic of Korea delegates would have discussions with the IOC representatives, and this would be followed, once again, by talks between the IOC and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. THE PRESIDENT invited all participants at the meeting to a dinner which would be given at 20.00 hours at the Palace Hotel.

The following morning, a further joint meeting would take place in order to review conclusions reached; if necessary, the IOC representatives would resume talks with each delegation. Finally, a press conference was scheduled for 12.30 hours on 11th June; both delegations were invited to attend, however the conference was to take the form of an official IOC delegation.

THE PRESIDENT requested the head of the delegation of the NOC of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Mr. Yu Sun Kim, to make some introductory comments (annex 2).

The President of the NOC of the Republic of Korea, Mr. Chong-Ha Kim, was then invited to speak (annex 3).

THE PRESIDENT thanked the heads of the respective delegations for their remarks and the meeting broke at 10.25 hours.

THE PRESIDENT welcomed the delegation from the NOC of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to the working session with the IOC at 10.50 hours. The IOC had heard the speech made by Mr. Yu Sun Kim, the NOC President, and THE PRESIDENT was pleased to learn that the NOC was willing to discuss concrete proposals with a review to reaching a concrete solution.

THE PRESIDENT reminded that the IOC had awarded the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad to the city of Seoul at its 1981 Session in Baden-Baden. The IOC had to respect this decision and also had to adhere to the “Olympic Charter”.

THE PRESIDENT, the Vice-Presidents and the Administrator could reach agreements in principle only on behalf of the IOC as the IOC Session’s approval of any such agreement was required. Such approval could be sought either at the October 1986 Session in Lausanne, or at the May 1986 Session in Istanbul, should any agreement be reached.

First, THE PRESIDENT wished to discuss which sports or events the IOC could offer the NOC of the DPR of Korea for organisation in the latter’s country. Secondly, free circulation between the Republic of Korea and the Democratic People’s Republuc of Korea prior to and during the Games was of the utmost importance.

The IOC had held lengthy discussions with the NOC of the Republic of Korea regarding which sports or events could be offered to the DPR of Korea. A compromise had been reached in principle, but not without difficulty. THE PRESIDENT outlined that the IOC could propose the organisation of one group of the Olympic football tournament in Pyongyang although this would not be easy in view of the fact that the deadline for the entry of teams had already passed. The FIFA had recently forwarded the list of the 108 participating teams, and the IOC had been surprised to see that the NOC of the DPR of Korea was not amongst them.

Furthermore, the IOC proposed that two or three cycling races start in the DPR of Korea and end in the Republic of Korea. In addition, the IOC was prepared to offer the NOC of the DPR of Korea the organisation of one complete sport, either archery or fencing including the staging of the victory medal ceremonies, as well as the organisation of table-tennis, again including the holding of the victory ceremonies in Pyongyang.

THE PRESIDENT stressed that the NOC of the DPR of Korea had experience in organising international table-tennis competitions, having hosted the 1979 World Championships. THE PRESIDENT had personally convinced the ITTF that the 1988 Olympic table-tennis tournament should be staged in Pyongyang, but only after difficulty in view of the fact that two countries had not been granted visas to the DPR of Korea immediately prior to the 1979 Championships, although the IF had been assured that all countries would be granted access.

Moreover, the IOC was also offering the NOC of the DPR of Korean an important part in the cultural programme of the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad, and was proposing that two separate teams, from the Republic of Korea and from the DPR of Korea, march together in the parade at the opening ceremony.

THE PRESIDENT urged the NOC to bear in mind that it was the first time in Olympic history that the Games would be split although the equestrian events had been held in Stockholm in 1956 and the rest of the Games in Melbourne. This, however, was a difference case as Australian quarantine regulations had not permitted the staging of the equestrian events. For 1988 the Republic of Korea was ready to organise all sports on the Olympic programme, all facilities having been completed. However, after much discussion the IOC was now extending a gesture to the NOC of the DPR of Korea by offering the organisation of certain events, provided the IOC Session confirmed the agreement that would be reach to this effect.

["Delete" and checkmark in left margin] THE PRESIDENT stated that only after discussion of free circulation between the Republic of Korea and the Democratic People’s of Korea could other matters be raised.

MR. KIM replied that his delegation had listened carefully to the President’s words, point out that at the previous two meetings and on other occasions the question of the formation of the Organising Committee in the DPR of Korea had been raised. The NOC wished to discuss this and all other related questions at the current meeting.

The NOC of the DPR of Korea wished to host various significant events in order to make the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad a great festival. Moreover, it was prepared to send a single team to the Games provided it were allowed to organise all preliminaries and finals in football, table-tennis, archery, wrestling, gymnastics and judo.

MR. KIM stressed that it would be the first time that a team from the DPR of Korea would take part in sports competitions in the Republic of Korea, but it was his NOC’s desire to render the IOC’s Presidents efforts worthwhile.

The question of the appellation of the Games had already been raised at the previous two meetings, MR. KIM stated. He felt that as the Games would be shared between the two Koreas there should be a common appellation for the Games. However, in view of the objections voiced by the NOC of the Republic of Korea bearing in mind the IOC’s position, it was suggest that for those sports and events staged in Pyongyang the Games be called the “XXIVth Olympic Games – Pyongyang”, a solution MR. KIM believed would be acceptable to all.

Moreover, a separate Organising Committee would be set up in the DPR of Korea, MR. KIM informed. He agreed that other details could be settled once the principle questions had been dealt with.

THE PRESIDENT replied that he did not wish to discuss the appellation of the Games or the formation of a separate OCOG until the questions of which sports or events would be offered to the NOC of the DPr of Korea and of free circulation between the two countries had been settled.

He repeated that the IOC had made a great effort in order to be able to offer the NOC of the DPR of Korea the organisation In Pyongyang of two complete sports, table tennis and archery, in addition to the staging of three cycling races and part of the Olympic football tournament.

THE PRESIDENT queried whether or not the NOC of the DPR of Korea wished to accept the IOC’s proposals as such, pointing out that it was not possible to offer the NOC any other conditions.

Once the question of the sports and events was settled, THE PRESIDENT wished to know the procedure adopted by the NOC of the DPR of Korea to ensure the free circulation before and during the Games of approximately 25,000 members of the Olympic family accredited Seoul, including athletes, officials, NOC delegates and 9,000-10,000 journalists and radio and television representatives.

Further to queries from MR. CHIN, Vice-President of the NOC, THE PRESIDENT confirmed that other matters such as the appellation of the Games and the formation of a separate Organising Committee could be discussed only after an agreement had been reached with regard to the two sports or events to be staged in the DPR of Korea and free circulation between the two Koreas.

MR. CHIN stated that his NOC had hoped to organise certain sports in their entirety.

THE PRESIDENT stressed that as far as the 1988 Olympic football tournament was concerned, the NOC of the DPR of Korea would be able to organise one group of this but not all four groups. Nor would it be able to stage the finals.

MR. CHIN insisted that his NOC wished to hold the entire football tournament commenting that it had been his Committee’s understanding that the IOC would grant it the right to do so. The NOC would not be able to accept the IOC’s proposal for preliminaries of certain sports to be staged in the DPR of Korea and the finals in the Republic of Korea. MR. CHIN felt that the IOC and his NOC should study jointly the problems of organising Games in the DPR of Korea. There were 23 sports on the Olympic programme, and the NOC of the DPR of Korea could not accept the IOC’s proposals for it to stage two complete sports only. The NOC wished to hold six sports in their entirety.

MR. CHIN urged the IOC to re-consider the position of the NOC of the DPR of Korea and in particular the NOC’s staging of certain sports, the appellation of the Games and the formation of a separate OCOG.

THE PRESIDENT repeated the IOC’s offer, stating that it was their last proposal. If the NOC did not wish to accept the IOC’s proposal, then discussions could not continue as no solution would be reached.

He stressed that the IOC wished to raise also the question of free circulation before dealing with the appellation of the Games and the formation of a second OCOG.

THE PRESIDENT felt that the respective positions of the IOC and of the NOC of the DPR of Korea differed greatly, emphasising that it had been difficult to convince the NOC of the Republic of Korea that certain conditions should be offered to facilitate the participation of the NOC of the DPR of Korea in the Games.

MR. CHIN clarified that his NOC required time to study the IOC’S offer, and suggested that perhaps women’s volleyball be held in the Republic of Korea and men’s volleyball in his country. The NOC of the DPR of Korea could accept the IOC’s offer to stage table tennis and archery but also wished to hold other sports in their entirety. including the preliminaries and finals in such sports.

THE PRESIDENT emphasised that the IOC wished to receive details regarding free circulation between the Republic of Korea and the DPR of Korea.

MR. KIM replied that this issue had been discussed at their second meeting held in January 1986 at which time the NOC had made its position clear, stressing that all measures would be taken to ensure free Circulation.

Furthermore, his NOC had understood from the President that it would be able to organise the whole 1988 Olympic football tournament and had contacted the FIFA accordingly. MR. KIM added that his NOC was prepared to stage sports in their entirety if the respective IFs agreed. He urged the IOC to re-consider the matter and to hold further discussions in order to find a solution to the problem.

MR. KIM commented that the NOC of the DPR of Korea was under the impression that the IOC wished to impose its proposals on the NOC.

THE PRESIDENT responded that the IOC was not imposing any conditions on the NOC. He stressed that the NOC had to understand the IOC’ss position and that the latter had to abide by its decision to award the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad to Seoul and to respect the “Olympic Charter”. Furthermore, the IOC was doing its utmost to ensure the success of these Games by trying to encourage the participation of all NOCs.

In view of the division between the two Koreas, for the first time in Olympic history the IOC was offering special conditions to the NOC of the DPR of Korea to facilitate its participation.

THE PRESIDENT stressed that he had never stated that the NOC of the DPR of Korea would be able to hold the entire football tournament, and queried why the NOC wished to do so in view of the fact that it had not even entered a team.

THE PRESIDENT again called for greater clarification with regard to the free circulation from the Republic of Korea to the DPR of Korea and vice versa.

THE PRESIDENT remarked that at present there was no communication between the two Koreas and queried whether or not accredited members of the Olympic family would be permitted access to the DPR of Korea from the Republic of Kroea, and, if so, whether or not the Olympic identity card would suffice.

THE PRESIDENT emphasised the efforts being made by the IOC for the benefit of the NOC of the DPR of Korea.

MR. KIM explained that at the last joint meeting the NOC of the DPR of Korea had clarified its position with regard to circulation between the two Koreas. First and foremost, however, the NOC wished to discuss the appellation of the Games and the formation of a separated OCOG in addition to which sports or events would be staged in its country.

THE PRESIDENT adjourned the meeting at 11.30 hours, adding that a further meeting with the NOC of the DPR of Korea would be held at 15.30 hours that afternoon.

At 15.00 hours, THE PRESIDENT re-opened the meeting between the IOC and representatives of the Korean Olympic Committee.

He explained that during discussions held that morning with the NOC of the DPR of Korea, the IOC had proposed that all competitions in two sports should be allocated to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. Mention had also been made of matches in one of the four football tournament groups being held in the DPR of Korea, and the suggestion that some cycling races might begin in the DPR of Korea and end in the Republic of Korea put forward. The IOC had emphasised that such a situation, a “division” of the Games, would be exceptional in Olympic history; this had occurred only once before in the context of the Games of the XVIth Olympiad in Melbourne when, as a result of quarantine difficulties, equestrian events had taken place in Stockholm.  This type of problem, however, would by no means be a reason for allocating events or sports to the DPR of Korea, as Seoul was fully prepared for the organisation of the 23 sports currently on the Olympic programme.

Delegates from the NOC of the DPR of Korea had wished to discuss the question of the appellation of the Games; however, the IOC had made clear that this topic could not be considered until an agreement regarding sports events to be held in the DPR of Korea had been reached. Representatives of the IOC had stressed that confirmation regarding free circulation to and from the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea would be required for all properly accredited persons during the entire period of the Games of the Olympiad.

The NOC of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea was still requesting the allocation of six sports: football, archery, judo, wresting, gymnastics, table-tennis. The IOC had declared that this could not be granted; there had been many negotiations between the IOC and the NOC of the Republic of Korea in order to reach an agreement over the possibility of competitions in two sports being held outside the Republic of Korea.

At 16.30 hours, a further meeting would take place between the IOC and delegates from the NOC of the DPR of Korea.

THE PRESIDENT wished to learn the position of the Korean Olympic Committee in relation to the comments he just made. The meeting broke for ten minutes at 15.10 hours.

MR. CHONG-HA KIM, President of the Korean Olympic Committee, wished to reiterate the necessity for delegates from the DPR of Korea to confirm the participation of their country’s athletes in the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad before an agreement could be reached. During previous discussions, the question of allocating preliminary events in volleyball, handball and football had arisen, as long as the DPR of Korea were to guarantee respect of the “Olympic Charter”. Nevertheless, the delegates from the NOC of the DPR of Korea had refused to consider seriously this proposal, and appeared to refute the right of the Republic of Korea to stage the Games. MR. KIM emphasised that only after participation by the DPR of Korea had been confirmed, and following consultation with the relevant IFs, could sports or events be allocated to DPR of Korea territory. It was essential, furthermore, that the Olympic Committee of the DPR of Korea should affirm its respect of the “Olympic Charter” and of the decision made in Baden-Baden to award the hosting of the Games to Seoul.

MR. KIM wished to clarify that, should the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea be granted the holding of all competitions relating to two sports, organisational matters would remain under the control of the SLOOC; in accordance with the “Charter”, the OCOG was the sole body responsible for organising the competitions and the SLOOC had made great efforts in order to advance preparatory work.

The Korean NOC proposed the sports of table-tennis and fencing; the DPR of Korea should then agree to proper inspection of venues by the IFs, free transfer of officials, transportation of sports equipment, entry of media representatives and so forth.

MR. KIM stressed that the proposal to modify the appellation of the Games was unacceptable to the SLOOC, and was, moreover, in contradiction with articles 4 and 8 of the “Olympic Charter” which stipulated that the Games’ organisation should be entrusted to one city.

At the previous meeting, it had been proposed that the ream road race should begin in the DPR of Korea and end in Seoul; this would create an atmosphere of harmony within the Korean peninsula. The Korean Olympic Committee also retained its proposal advocating a joint parade of Korean athletes; each delegation would parade in columns, each column having its own flag and athletes wearing the uniform of their country. The DPR of Korea was also fully welcome to participate in the varied cultural programme which was planned in the context of the Games.

MR. KIM emphasised that the NOC of the Republic of Korea was not prepared to allocate more than two full sports to the DPR of Korea, and that he was not in a position to agree to one of the football tournament groups being held outside the Republic of Korea.

THE PRESIDENT underlined that any agreements reached were with a view to securing maximum participation of the NOCs at the Games, hence their success. During his recent stay in Seoul he had had talks with the Head of State of the Republic of Korea and it had finally been decided to offer, through the intervention of the IOC, the sports of table-tennis and archery to the DPR of Korea. Minister Lee had since informed him in writing that the proposal had been modified and was now for table-tennis and fencing rather than archery.  THE PRESIDENT had previously contacted the table-tennis and archery IFs and, in principle, approval had been gained for holding competitions in the DPR of Korea. He understood that, besides suggestions concerning certain cycle races and some football competitions, the KOC was not ready to consider the allocation of further events to the DPR of Korea at this stage. Should agreement be reached with the NOC of the Democratic People’s Republic regarding sports, the question of free circulation between the two countries was of the utmost importance.

THE PRESIDENT requested the full co-operation of the NOC of the Republic of Korea as a decision had to be made; a breakdown in negotiations could threaten the success of the Olympic Games.

MR. KIM fully appreciated that the current talks affected the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad and that it was in the interest of the KOC to reach an agreement; he guarantee his full co-operation.

He explained that it had been decided to offer fencing as a sport to be hosted by the DPR of Korea since archery was currently a developing sport in the Republic of Korea, and it was felt that this should be taken into consideration.

Since the IOC delegation had no further comments, THE PRESIDENT adjourned the meeting at 16.00 hours.

The meeting between the IOC and the delegation from the NOC of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea resumed at 16.30 hours.

THE PRESIDENT wished to know the position of the NOC regarding the IOC’s proposals put forward that morning.

MR. KIM stated that his NOC had already expressed its point of view regarding the main problems, pointing out that it believed that the question of the sports and event it hoped to stage was closely linked with the formation of a separate OCOG and the appellation of the Games. If the problems concerning the creation of an OCOG and the appellation of the Games were solved satisfactorily, then the issue of the events could be settled.

Thanks to the IOC’s efforts and the previous joint meetings, MR. KIM felt that some progress had been made. However, further meetings were still required to ensure the success of the Games. He appreciated the IOC’s offer for his NOC to organise the full archery and table- tennis competitions, but his Committee could not accept the staging of only the preliminaries of one group of the football tournament.

If the IOC was not prepared to offer the organisation of the entire Olympic football tournament, t hen the NOC of the DPR of Korea wished to stage two of the following sports in their entirety: judo, wrestling, shooting or weightlifting. These would be in addition to archery and table- tennis. Moreover, the NOC also wished to stage women’s volleyball, men’s basketball and women’s handball. With regarding to cycling, MR. KIM proposed that two races start in the DPR of Korea and finish in the Republic of Korea, and a further two start in the latter and end in the DPR of Korea. Furthermore, fencing was also worthy of serious study.

MR. KIM stressed that his NOC envisaged holding a separate cultural programme.

The NOC of the DPR of Korea had expressed its position with regard to free circulation between the two Koreas on a previous occasion, and MR. KIM confirmed this stance, guaranteeing that there would be no restrictions for athletes and the media as far as access to the DPR of Korea was concerned. Unfortunately, no details had been received from the Republic of Korea in this respect.

MR. KIM queried the IOC’s stance vis-à-vis the appellation of the Games and the formation of a separate Organising Committee.

THE PRESIDENT replied that many other problems had to be solved besides the appellation of the Games. However, none of these could be discussed until an agreement had been reached regarding which sports could be staged in the DPR of Korea. The IOC had already proposed that the NOC of the DPR of Korea organise two full sports, one group of the football tournament and 3 cycling races, and THE PRESIDENT felt it unlikely that the NOC’s new proposal would be accepted by the Korean Olympic Committee.

THE PRESIDENT commented that slight changes could perhaps be made to the IOC’s proposal, adding that either Mr. Siperco, the first Vice-President of the IOC, or he was ready to meet with the NOC of the DPR of Korea at any time to try to reach an agreement. At present, the gap in the positions of the IOC and of the NOC was narrowing, however.

THE PRESIDENT reiterated that no other points could be discussed until it had been agreed which sports could be held in the DPR of Korea. The IOC’s offered important since for the fire time in Olympic history the Games would be divided. It had not been easy for THE PRESIDENT or the IOC delegation to convince the NOC of the Republic of Korea to offer certain events to the DPR of Korea.

MR. CHIN urged the IOC and the NOC of the Republic of Korea to review his NOC’s new proposal and to consider substantial changes to the IOC’s own proposal. The NOC of the DPR of Korea would again study the IOC’s offer, stressing that any competitions held in the DPR of Korea should be called the “XXIVth Olympic Games in Pyongyang.”

THE PRESIDENT replied that the appellation of the Games would be discussed only after an agreement had been concluded regarding the sports to be held in the DPR of Korea. The IOC could not accept the NOC’s new proposal since it called for the staging of too many sports competitions. THE PRESIDENT emphasised the efforts made by the IOC to convince the NOC of the Republic of Korea to allow the IOC to make such an offer, an offer which the NOC of the DPR of Korea should consider seriously.

Mr. Siperco or THE PRESIDENT were prepared to meet the delegates from the NOC of the DPR of Korea whilst they were in Lausanne or if necessary to convene another meeting.

After the first and second joint meeting, MR. KIM informed that his NOC had seriously considered the organisation of the full Olympic football tournament. However, owing to the IOC’s Presidents efforts, his NOC had since decided not to request the staging of the entire tournament, but now wished to hold two other full sports, in addition to archery and table-tennis, and also part of the volleyball, handball and basketball competitions.

MR. KIM stressed that his NOC’s new proposal had been made after serious study of the question in order to try to reach a solution to the problem. The issues of the appellation of the Games and the formation of a separate OCOF should be raised when discussing the question of the sports to organised in the DPR of Korea as the three problems were closely linked. MR. KIM again queried the IOC’s stance with respect to the Games’ appellation and the formation of a second OCOG. His NOC proposed that all competitions staged within its territory be called the “XXIVth Olympic Games in Pyongyang”, and that the OCOG be called the “Pyongyang Organising Committee”.

Once again THE PRESIDENT clarified that the appellation of the Games and the formation of a separate OCOG could only be discussed once the problem of the sports had been settled. Nevertheless, the IOC was prepared to study slight modifications to the proposal it had made that morning with a view to finding a solution to the problem. Four cycling races between the two Koreas could perhaps be staged, provided the NOC of the Republic of Korea agreed. However, the latter were unlikely to agree to the granting of an additional two full sports and other events to the NOC of the DPR of Korea.

THE PRESIDENT repeated the IOC’s offer of two full sports plus one group of the football tournament and four some cycling events, provided the proposals were ratified by the IOC Session.["Three? or ?" and checkmark in lefthand margin]

MR. HAN, a member of the NOC of the DPR of Korea, expressed his colleague’s appreciation of the efforts made by the IOC for the success of the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad. Many details relating to the Games had to be solved in order to reach a final agreement at a later date.

Already on previous occasions views had been exchanged relating to the sports competitions to be held in the DPR of Korea, and it had now been decided that the Games would be shared between the two Koreas. After great efforts, both sides were narrowing their differences of opinion.

The NOC of the DPR of Korea would agree to organise archery and table-tennis, but had now put forward a further proposal, which MR. HAN felt would be easily acceptable to all parties.

The NOC of the DPR of Korea was aware of the IOC’s position, but hoped that the latter would consider the NOC’s new suggestions for the benefit of the Olympic Games and with a view to reaching a final agreement.

Various problems relating to the 1988 Olympic Games, all of which were closely linked, had to be solved, and MR. HAN urged the IOC to consider carefully the question of sports in order to hasten the conclusion of an agreement. Views could also be exchanged on other aspects such as free circulation and the Olympic torch relay.

The NOC of the DPR of Korea was ready to discuss any points the IOC considered to be of importance, in addition to the issues the NOC felt should be raised.

MR. HAN pointed out that the delegates had travelled a great distance from their country where they worked for the benefit of the Olympic Movement and their national athletes, and thus had great expectations when coming to Lausanne.

THE PRESIDENT thanked Mr. Han for his remarks, stating that he understood the position of the NOC of the DPR of Korea. He was also aware of the distance between the delegates’ home country and Switzerland and realised that the representatives were all very busy.

THE PRESIDENT repeated that it was of the utmost importance to settle in principle the question of sports to be staged in the DPR of Korea. If the NOC of the DPR of Korea agreed to do so, then the IOC would be willing to discuss other matters in the next few days. However, no such matters could be discussed until the NOC agreed on which sports it would organise.

After a break of 20 minutes, THE PRESIDENT emphasised that the delegation had to realize that the IOC was trying to help the NOC and trying to reach an agreement. Proposals such as those made by the IOC had never been made before in the history of the Olympic Movement.

The IOC understood the NOC’s position, but a solution could be reached if the NOC accepted the IOC’s offer, which could perhaps be amended slightly. The IOC would then be willing to convene a fourth and last meeting before the October 1986 Session in Lausanne with an established agenda containing points the NOC wished to raise.

THE PRESIDENT stated that the NOC delegation could provide the IOC with its reply by the following morning at 11.00 hours. A special meeting presided either by THE PRESIDENT or Mr. Siperco could be held, if request, after the press conference on 11th June 1986.

MR. KIM confirmed his delegation’s presence at 11.00 hours the following day.

The meeting then adjourned at 17.50 hours.

Wednesday, 11th June 1986

At 10.00 hours, the meeting between the IOC and the NOC of the Republic of Korea was resumed.

THE PRESIDENT stated that a tri-lateral meeting would be held later that morning, between 11.30 and 12.00 hours, depending on the length of discussions between the IOC and representatives of the NOC of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

THE PRESIDENT stressed that the IOC was striving to gain the agreement of the NOC of the DPR of Korea to participate in the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad and to propose that some events be hosted on DPR of Korea territory. He explained that there was great pressure from the NOCs of Socialist countries for an agreement with the DPR of Korea to be concluded. The Secretary General of the USOC had recently been in Cuba and President Castro had mentioned that his country would not take part in the Seoul Games unless an arrangement had been made with the DPR of Korea. In addition, many telexes had been received at the IOC headquarters from Socialist countries’ NOCs, also a letter had been received from Mr. Gramov of the USSR, which all pushed for an agreement in respect of the Games.

It was essential, firstly, to decide how many full sports could be granted to the Olympic Committee of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. Once this matter has been settled, later discussions could focus upon logistics and organisational issues such as free circulation or accredited persons, television coverage etc. Moreover, these questions would require detailed examination by experts in both countries.

The IOC would draw up a paper proposing that competitions in conjunction with two sports and also several events be held in the DPR of Korea. This would be forwarded to both delegations and a deadline fixed each NOC would be requested to reply before this deadline expired.

After the previous day’s talks, it was proposed to allocate all events relating to table-tennis and archery, one tournament group of football competitions (which would not include the team representing the Republic of Korea) and some cycling events. THE PRESIDENT emphasised that the IOC’s aim was to guarantee the success of the Games of the Olympiad, to gain the full support of the NCOs. He mentioned the ANOC meetings which had taken place in Seoul so successfully. These meetings had been planned for Seoul with a view to assessing NOC attendance; in fact only eight NOCs had failed to be present, including the NOC of the DPR of Korea.

THE PRESIDENT stated that if an agreement between the two Koreas were reached, a further meeting would be held in Lausanne in order to discuss concrete details. Much preparatory work would have to be undertaken and an agenda for the meeting drawn up and worked through methodically.

THE PRESIDENT requested a more flexible attitude on the part of the delegation representing the KOC, asking its members to bear in mind the fact that the IOC was working towards the peaceful celebration of the Games.

The meeting broke for ten minutes at 10.20 hours.

MR. KIM expressed his appreciation of the work of the IOC and of the effort made to reach an agreement. He apologized for any lack of diplomacy which he might have shown during the previous day’s talks; he felt, however, that it had been necessary to make clear the stance of his NOC in order that a compromise could then be sought to the mutual satisfaction of both parties. He wondered whether the delegation from the NOC of the DPR Of Korea was reacting positively to the suggestions being put forward.

There was no objection to two full sports being allocated to the DPR of Korea. Mention had been made of table-tennis and archery; however, the KOC would prefer table-tennis and fencing. Discussions on this precise point could be taken up at a later date. The proposal concerning the cycle team road race was also acceptable. As for the allocation of one group of football tournaments, he felt that it might be difficult to reach a national consensus over this since football was a particularly popular sport in the Republic of Korea.

MR. KIM added that the NOC of Korea had not, as yet, submitted entries for the regional preliminaries. Nevertheless, if the allocation of one group of preliminary football competitions would help towards the settling of an agreement with the NOC of the DPR of Korea, he would be in favour of this.

THE PRESIDENT mentioned that it was a question of six matches only being held outside the Republic of Korea. He was of the opinion that much progress had been made; the NOC of the DPR of Korea had initially requested co-hosting of the Games, followed by twelve sports, then six sports. Two sports were now offered to the NOC and he felt sure that an important step had been achieved.

An official letter from the IOC would be prepared and sent to both delegations, asking for approval of the above-mentioned proposal before the end of June. Should approval be gained from both sides, further meetings would take place in order to examine the questions he had previously referred to.

THE PRESIDENT closed the discussions by thanking the delegation from the NOC of the Republic of Korea.

THE PRESIDENT welcomed the delegation from the NOC of the DPR of Korea to the meeting at 11.00 hours. As there was not sufficient time to resume discussions, THE PRESIDENT queried whether or not his understand of the NOC’s position was correct. At a meeting in his office earlier that morning, THE PRESIDENT believed the NOC had confirmed they would accept the IOC’s offer regarding the sports to be staged in the DPR of Korea provided the IOC agreed to the denomination “Games of the XXIVth Olympiad in Pyongyang”, to the setting up of a separate Organising Committee in Pyongyang and to the convening of another meeting.

MR. KIM replied that his delegation wished to ensure the success of the 1988 Olympic Games by satisfying the wishes of the entire Korean people. Although little progress had been made, certain views had been exchanged. However, other important points had not been discussed. MR. KIM felt that the IOC and his NOC should discuss at this bi-lateral meeting important points such as the proposals regarding sports to be held in the DPR of Korea. Further views should be exchanged and decisions taken in order to narrow the differences of opinion. Moreover, the appellation of the Games and the formation of a separate OCOG should be discussed at this juncture.

THE PRESIDENT had understood from what Mr. Kim had previously stated that if the IOC agreed to support the suggestion by the NOC of the DPR of Korea to call those sports and events held in the DPR of Korea the “Games of the XXIVth Olympiad in Pyongyang” and to set up a separate OCOG, the NOC would be ready to accept the IOC’s offer.

MR. KIM requested time for his delegation to meet alone.

After a break of 10 minutes, MR. KIM stressed that at previous meetings the IOC had stated that it would give the NOC three full sports to organise. However, at the current meeting the IOC was proposing two full sports only. MR. KIM underlined that his NOC required further time to study the proposal regarding sports and events both seriously and carefully.

THE PRESIDENT reiterated that the NOC was well aware of the IOC’s proposal. The delegation would be receiving an official letter from the IOC following that day’s meeting which would specify the IOC’s offer. The NOC would be granted until the end of June 1986 to study the letter and to reply to it. If the NOC replied positively and unconditionally, then the IOC would be prepared to study, together with the NOC, such items as the denomination of the Games, the formation of a separate OCOG, free circulation and television coverage, inter alia. Moreover, if the NOC of the DPR of Korea replied positively, the IOC would convene a fourth and final meeting between the NOCs of the Republic of Korea and of the DPR of Korea. This would take place prior to the 91st IOC Session in Lausanne in October 1986, perhaps at the end of July.

THE PRESIDENT requested Mr. Kim to inform the authorities in the DPR of Korea that the IOC, including the Vice-Presidents and himself, would do its utmost so best to support the request that the sports organised in the DPR of Korea could be called the “Games of the XXIVth Olympiad in Pyongyang”, and that a separate Organising Committee could be set up in Pyongyang which would deal directly with the IOC.

THE PRESIDENT added that a joint meeting would now take place at which the IOC’s press release would be read to the delegations. This did not require the latter’s approval as it would be issued only by the IOC. Moreover, the IOC would then hold a press conference to which they were all invited.

The meeting adjourned at 11.30 hours.

THE PRESIDENT welcomed to the meeting at 11.45 hours the delegations from the NOCs of the Republic of Korea and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. The press release to be issued by the IOC would shortly be read to the delegates for their information. It did not require their approval.

After the meeting, the heads of both delegations would be given an official letter asking for the respective NOC’s approval of which sports would be held in the DPR of Korea. An answer was required from both NOCs before the end of June 1986. If positive and unconditional replies from both Committees were received then a fourth meeting would be convened before the 91st IOC Session in October 1986 in Lausanne so that the Session could approve the proposals.

THE PRESIDENT requested the delegates not to speak at length with the representatives of the media as such action could have adverse effects on the work accomplished thus far. Only the IOC would hold a press conference.

THE PRESIDENT remarked that gradually a solution was being reached, and requested Mr. Samuel Pisar, the IOC’s juridical advisor, to read out the IOC’s press release, a copy of which would then be given to each delegation (see annex 4).

THE PRESIDENT reiterated that both NOCs were requested to reply before 30th June 1986 to the official letter they would be receiving from the IOC. If positive answers were received from both NOCs the IOC would begin to work on the organisational and operational aspects of the Games.

THE PRESIDENT observed that this was the last possibility for the question to be solved in order to ensure the success of the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad.

MR. YU SUN KIM, President of the NOC of the DPR of Korea, stated that his NOC also wished to ensure the success of the Games by fulfilling the desires of the Korean people. Views had been exchanged on certain matters for the benefit of the Olympic Movement and for the success of the 1988 Olympic Games. The painstaking efforts on the part of the IOC, and particularly the President, were commendable, and MR. KIM was convinced that if both NOCs studied each other’s positions, the next meeting would prove fruitful.

The NOC of the DPR of Korea had shown magnanimity and flexibility in many respects, and would do its utmost to secure successful Games in 1988. MR. KIM hoped that the IOC and the NOC of the Republic of Korea would do likewise.

MR. CHONG-HA KIM, President of the NOC of the Republic of Korea, remarked that the meaning participation of the NOC of the DPR of Korea in the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad had been discussed seriously during this third joint meeting under the chairmanship of the President of the IOC. MR. KIM expressed his delegation’s gratitude to the President for his constant efforts and support with a view to assuring the success of the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad.

The NOC of the Republic of Korea had also shown magnanimity and sincerity in presenting new proposals. Thanks to the IOC’s efforts the third meeting had provided momentum for further progress. If all side continued their discussions with determination, the fourth meeting would bear fruit.

MR. KIM concluded that his NOC would co-operated positively with the President of the IOC in his mediation efforts.

THE PRESIDENT thanked both NOC Presidents, stressing the importance for both Committees to reply to the IOC’s official letter. If both replies were positive, a fourth and final meeting would be convened with a set agenda at the end of July 1986. No further meetings could be held after that date in view of the short time remaining prior to the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad in the Autumn of 1988. Moreover, it would then be too late to find a solution.

THE PRESIDENT expressed his gratitude to the two NOC Presidents and their delegations for their support, co-operation and collaboration. He hoped the meetings would be recorded in history as a step towards international friendship and understanding.

THE PRESIDENT then thanked the IOC Vice-Presidents and Administrator délégué as well as his advisors, Messrs. Pisar and Stupp, the Head of his Cabinet, Mr. Coupat, and the IOC staff for arranging constructive working conditions.

THE PRESIDENT declared the meeting closed at 12.10 hours.

ANNEX 1

DELEGATION FROM THE KOREAN OLYMPIC COMMITTEE

Mr. Chong-Ha KIM President of the Korean Olympic Committee

Mr. Choong-Sik CHANG Vice-President of the Korean Olympic Committee

Mr. Man-Lip CHOY Vice-President of the Korean Olympic Committee

Mr. Chong-Ha LEE Member of the Korean Olympic Committee

Mr. Tae-Soon YIM Member of the Korean Olympic Committee

Mr. Joung-Moon NAM Member of the Korean Olympic Committee

DELEGATION FROM OLYMPIC COMMITTEE OF THE DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF KOREA

Mr. Yu Sun KIM President of the Olympic Committee of the
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

Mr. Chung Cuk CHIN Vice-President of the Olympic Committee of the
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

Mr. Ung CHANG Director of Secretariat, Olympic Committee of the
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

Mr. Chang On HAN Member of the Olympic Committee of the
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

Mr. Bok Man AN Member of the Olympic Committee of the
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

Mr. Myong Hwang CHO Member of the Olympic Committee of the
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

ANNEX 2

Opening Address

by Mr. Yu Sun KIM, President of the NOC of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

Respected Mr. Juan Antonio Samaranch, IOC President, Fellow Delegates from the International Olympic Committee, and the south,

It gives me pleasure to get together with you for discussing once again the problems to ensure the success of the 24th Olympic Games.

I wish to express profound thanks to the IOC for having prepared assiduously the 3rd joint meeting and provided us with every convenience.

We are well aware that meanwhile President Mr. Samaranch, all Vice-Presidents and other IOC officials have made every effort to cope with difficulties lying in the 24th Olympic Games and ensure the successful hosting of the Games, for which we highly appreciate you.

We patently showed to the world people, through the previous two joint meetings and various contracts, that we have the common desire to make an excellent sports festival of the 24th Olympic Games, come what may.

This single common desire is an important guarantee to enable our joint meeting to be successful.

In particular, third 3rd joint meeting is a very significant and responsible one for all of us.

The broad segments of the athletes and the peaceloving people all over the world who treasure the Olympic movement hope at this meeting we shall agree sincerely to all the relevant proposals one by one, thus opening up a new epochal milestone in the history of the Olympic movement.

We have made a certain progress in the discussion of the proposed problems through the first and second meetings, but fell short of the complete agreement.

Therefore, it is considered that at this 3rd joint meeting we should reach agreement on the basic problems which have been discussed so far.

To this end, it is necessary to earnestly approach this meeting, cherishing one goal and desire to get over the present difficulties of the Olympic movement and make an unprecedented sports festival of the 24th Olympic Games.

We are all given an important task to proceed this joint meeting successfully to produce an excellent fruition.

That is why we are not allowed to impose any one side’s will and demand on the other and moreover, should not commit such a thing as to create artificial difficulties in the way of the joint meeting by offering to the opposite whatever unjust conditions.

It is thought that each side should concede and show magnanimity and sincerity, having considered problems in view of general interests of the Olympic movement, thus narrowing differences of views and reaching agreement.

We are convinced that such way and manner in which we sincerely participate in the current joint meeting will help us easily solve all problems here.

Practically speaking, there are many complicated problems which should be solved.

Therefore, we have, at the previous joint meetings and the bilateral talk with the IOC in March, made clear our proposals on sharing the events in the north and south of Korea and the main relevant problems such as the appellation of the Games, the organizing committee, the cultural programme and other Olympic functions.

We are convinced that when the fundamental problems arising in the organization of the 24th Olympic Games, are solved on the firm basis of the Olympic spirit, the other auxiliary problems can be solved easily.

Our proposals are the realistic and elastic ones which have been put forth by taking into full account the positions of the IOC and the south.

We are ready to discuss sincerely any proposal, no matter which side may propose, if they were suggest in the true sense of ensuring the success of the 24th Olympic games, and expect that at this meeting the south Korean side and the IOC, too, will put forward realistic and concrete proposals.

Today the entire Korean people and the world peaceloving people whole heartedly desire that this 3rd joint meeting will be a historic one for ensuring success of the 24th Olympic Games, improving the relations between the north and the south of Korea and actively contributing to peace and peaceful reunification there.

Here are the eyes of the whole world are focussed [sic] again on Lausanne where we are now meeting.

We shall do all our sincere efforts, conscious of our noble task and heavy responsibility and unanimously desirous of making this joint meeting success at any cost.

I am convinced that at this joint meeting the IOC and the south will seriously consider our proposals and respond positively to them.

Thank you.

ANNEX 3

Keynote Address at the Joint Meeting

By Mr. Chong-Ha KIM, President of the NOC of the Republic of Korea

Your Excellency Juan Antonio Samaranch, President of the International Olympic Committee; Mr. Kim Yoo Soon, Chairman of the north Korean Sports Guidance Committee and the north Korean Olympic Committee; distinguished delegates!

First of all, on behalf of our delegation, I wish to express our deepest appreciation to President Samaranch and the delegates from the IOC for their warm welcome and efforts in arranging this third meeting.

It is a great pleasure to meet the north Korean delegates again five months after the second meeting.

In addition, I am very happy to tell you that the 5th ANOC General Assembly, held in Seoul on April 21 through April 26, concluded with great success, thanks to the cooperation and participation of many delegates including President Samaranch, and vice-presidents and executive members of the IOC. In this regard, I would like to take this opportunity to express once again our sincerest thanks to the IOC.

Today, under the chairmanship of President Samaranch, delegates from the IOC and the South and north Korean Olympic Committees will meet for the third time to discuss more meaningful participation by north Korea in the 24th Seoul Olympic Games.

At the two previous meetings held last October and early this year, I already explained in full detail that the Korean Olympic Committee, as the host of the 24th Olympiad, in faithful observance of the Olympic Charter and the agreements made with the IOC, is making meticulous preparations, including competition facilities and competition operation plans.

Meanwhile, we have reiterated our position in line with the Olympic Charter and the Olympic Spirit the door is wide open for all IOC member countries to freely participate in the Seoul Olympiad without any constraints. We committed ourselves clearly that we will heartily welcome north Korean athletes, our brethren, under the same conditions.

In particular we have expressed our willingness to discuss the matter of positive participation of north Korea within the framework of the Olympic Charter in order to make the 24th Olympiad more successful than any previous Olympiad, and to share with the entire Korean people the honour of hosting the Olympic Games which was entrusted to the City of Seoul.

In this context, we have fully cooperated with the sincere mediation efforts made by President Samaranch and the IOC, and in conformity with the agenda set up by the IOC we have exerted our utmost efforts to present and implement very reasonable proposals for north Korean athletes to join the 24th Olympiad in a more meaningful way.

Urging north Korea to take part in the Seoul Olympic Games without any conditions, respecting the Olympic Charter and the decision made by the IOC Session in Baden Baden in 1981, we have shown our sincerity to discuss the following matters :

Joint entrance of the South and north Korean teams in the Opening Ceremony.Allocation of some preliminaries to north Korea.Linking South and north Korea in the cycling team road race.More significant participation of north Korea in the various cultural programmes.

If these matters are settled, the 24th Seoul Olympiad, will provide a historic occasion for mutual accommodation, trust and peaceful relations between South and north Korea.

President Samaranch,

Our extensive and meticulous preparatory work for the successful 24th Olympiad is nearing completion, and I am convinced that we have exerted every possible effort for our brethren, the north Korean athletes, to join the historic Seoul Olympic Games in a meaningful way.

It is my firm belief that such efforts will win the support and understanding of all international sports federations and world sports leaders, as well as the IOC.

Moreover, I notice with great pleasure that our conviction was confirmed at the 5th ANOC General Assembly held in Seoul last April.

With the presence of all the delegates from the two main pillars of the Olympic Movement, the IOC and the ANOC, all participants expressed their great satisfaction after witnessing our through preparations for the 24th Olympiad.

Furthermore, they voiced unanimously their support and understanding for the position of the Korean Olympic Committee in attending this Lausanne meeting.

I believe that in order to bring about positive results from the third meeting, all of us should humbly consider the aspirations of the world sports community and respect the Olympic Charter and the decisions made by the IOC Session.

I have no doubt that if the north Korean Olympic Committee shows positive response to our position, this third meeting will make progress.

We wish to make it clear that through positive cooperation and with the kind efforts of mediation by the IOC, we will put forth our best efforts to make the proposals already presented by our side a reality.

ANNEX 4

COMITE INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIQUE Lausanne, le 11 juin 1986

Ref. No. PR/34 /86

PRESS RELEASE OF THE IOC

At the initiative of the International Olympic Committee, delegations from the National Olympic Committees of the Republic of Korea and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, led by their respective Presidents, Mr. Chong-Ha Kim and Mr. Yu Sun Kim, met for third time at the IOC headquarters in Lausanne, on 10th and 11th June 1986, under the Chairmanship of the President of the IOC, H.E. Juan Antonio Samranch.

The IOC was also represented by its Vice-Presidents, Mr. Alexandru Siperco, Ashwini Kumar and Mr. Berthold Beitz as well as the Administrateur délégué of the IOC, Mr. Raymond Gafner and assisted by Maitre Samuel Pisar, Mr. Howard Stupp and Mr. Alain Coupat.

In the course of extensive discussions which took place in a cooperative and cordial atmosphere, the differences between the parties were narrowed considerably, both NOCs stressing their sincere desire to ensure the success of the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad in 1988.

With this fundamental objective in mind, the IOC delegation, in the spirit of the “Olympic Charter” and the decisions taken at the 1981 IOC Session in Baden-Baden, proposed to both parties that a number of events on the programme of the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad be delegated to the NOC of the DPR Korea. Specifically, the organisation of two full sports would be entrusted to the NOC of the DPR of Korea to be held in its territory.

The IOC also proposed that certain additional events be partly located in the DPR Korea, and that cultural manifestations connected with the Olympic Games be organised in both parts of the Korean peninsula.

The two Korean NOCs have undertaken to study this proposal and to communicate to the IOC their willingness to accept it in principle by 30th June 1986; they have already confirmed to the IOC that free access of all members of the Olympic Family to the relevant Olympic venues in the North and South would be ensured. The IOC will then convene a new meeting in order to settle all necessary organisational and operational aspects.