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Digital Archive International History Declassified

November 04, 1956

CABLE, N. FIRIUBIN TO SOVIET FOREIGN MINISTRY

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    In this coded telegram, the Soviet Ministry is informed of Imre Nagy’s location at the Yugolsav embassy in Budapest. Firiubin reports that the Yugoslavs are attempting to obtain a statement from Nagy in support of Kadar’s new government. Tito is noted as requesting that the Soviet government not repress communists who ‘did not immediately take the correct line’ during the uprising and that the Soviet government protect the Yugoslav embassy from potential attack.
    "Cable, N. Firiubin to Soviet Foreign Ministry" November 04, 1956, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, Published in CWIHP Bulletin 10, p. 143-144. Translated for CWIHP by Benjamin Aldrich-Moodie. http://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/111099
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    http://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/111099

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Cable, N. Firiubin to Soviet Foreign Ministry 4 November 1956

Strictly secret
Copying is forbidden
Coded Telegram

From BELGRADE

PRIORITY

Kardelj informed me that on the night of November 4, they got in touch with Imre Nagy, as had been agreed upon with comrade Khrushchev.

Imre Nagy, Santo Zoltan and 11 more Hungarian communists are located in the Yugoslav embassy in Budapest. It is not yet known, Kardelj said, whether Nagy Imre made his last statement in the name of the government in Budapest. If he made this statement, they, the Yugoslavs, will try to get him to announce that he did so under reactionary pressure [nazhim reaktsiia]. They also intend to come to an agreement with Imre Nagy so that he will make a statement supporting the government headed by Kadar in Sol'nok.

In Kardelj's words, such an announcement would facilitate the discussion of the Hungarian issue in the Security Council and the recognition of Kadar's government as the legal government. Kardelj, on Tito's instructions, requested the advice of the CPSU and the Soviet government as to whether to continue further talks with Imre Nagy. Tito also asked the Soviet government to convey to Kadar's government the request that they not repress those communists who did not immediately take the correct line during the recent events in Hungary.

Tito, in Kardelj's words, also asked the Soviet government to take measures to protect the Yugoslav embassy from possible attacks on it, especially if reactionaries find out that Nagy, who is located in the embassy, is supporting Kadar's government.

4/XI-56 N. FIRIUBIN