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Digital Archive International History Declassified

October 08, 1985

MEETING BETWEEN THE NATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEES OF THE ROK AND OF THE DPRK HELD UNDER THE AEGIS OF THE INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEE

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    Minutes of meetings between the National Olympic Committees of North and South Korea, with IOC President Samaranch present. The groups discussed the co-hosting of the 1988 Summer Olympic Games.
    "Meeting between the National Olympic Committees of the ROK and of the DPRK held under the Aegis of the International Olympic Committee " October 08, 1985, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, International Olympic Committee Archives (Switzerland), SEOUL’ 88, POLITICAL MATTERS, DE 1982 A MAI 86. Obtained for NKIDP by Sergey Radchenko. http://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/113455
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MEETING BETWEEN DELEGATION’S OF THE NOCS OF THE REPUBLIC OF KOREA AND OF THE DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF KOREA HELD UNDER THE AEGIS OF THE INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEE – Lausanne, 8th-9th October 1985

Tuesday, 8th October 1985
The meeting opened at 10h10 in the presence of representatives from the IOC, and from the NOCs of the Republic of Korea and of the DPR Korea (see annex 1).

THE PRESIDENT welcomed the delegations and introduced the Mayor of Lausanne, Mr. Paul-René Martin.

MR. MARTIN stated that it was a great honour and a pleasure for Lausanne, the Olympic City and headquarters of the IOC, to welcome the representatives from both NOCs. Lausanne was proud that the IOC’s headquarters were based in the city, and it was hoped that the atmosphere would be conducive to favourable discussions. In fact, the delegates would present in Lausanne to work for unity between the two NOCs, and thus unity in the Olympic Movement, in order to create a more peaceful world.

THE PRESIDENT was pleased to receive the two delegations at the IOC’s headquarters, and informed that he had met representatives from both NOCs the previous day. The latter were aware of the way in which the meetings had proceeded.

THE PRESIDENT reviewed the meeting programme, pointing out that the IOC delegation would receive a delegation from the NOC of the DPR of Korea at 17h00. An official dinner would be held that evening.


A joint or separate meetings would be held as required the following day so that the conclusions of the meeting could be approved. THE PRESIDENT would give a press conference at 18h00 on 9th October 1985, and invited the Presidents of both delegations to accompany him.

THE PRESIDENT wished to know if either delegation had any queries regarding the meeting procedures.

MR. CHONG-HA KIM, President of the Korean Olympic Committee, confirmed that he had no questions.

THE PRESIDENT then gave the floor to Mr. Yu Sun Kim, President of the NOC of the DPR Korea.

MR. YU SUN KIM read out a statement on behalf of his delegation (annex 2).

THE PRESIDENT thanked Mr. Yu Sun Kim, and invited Mr. Chong-Ha Kim, President of the NOC of the Republic of Korea, to address the delegates.

MR. CHONG-HA KIM read out the statement of his NOC (annex 3).

THE PRESIDENT thanked Mr. Kim, and proposed that the meeting be adjourned until the afternoon’s separate sessions. Before closing, however, he introduced the IOC delegation (see annex 1), pointing out that Mr. Ashwini Kumar, second Vice-President, had just undergone major surgery and had been unable to travel to Lausanne. However, Mr. Kumar sent his regards to both delegations.

MR. CHONG-HA KIM introduced the members of his delegation, commenting that they were also accompanied by 3 advisors.

MR. YU SUN KIM introduced his delegation which was also accompanied by 3 advisors

THE PRESIDENT adjourned the joint meeting at 11h00.



Tuesday, 8th October 1985

The IOC delegation then re-convened alone at 11h10 to discuss the statements made earlier that morning by the two Korean NOCs.

THE PRESIDENT reiterated that the 1988 Olympic Summer Games had been awarded to Seoul in 198 and that Seoul was carrying out its obligations in accordance with the “Olympic Charter”. He added that Seoul was doing much work and spending a substantial amount of money in preparing for the Games.

THE PRESIDENT stated that it appeared that the DPR Korea had always taken a negative attitude towards Seoul being awarded the Games. It was thought that the DPR Korea now wanted to share the prestige that Seoul might reap in its hosting of the Games.

THE PRESIDENT pointed out that this was the first official proposal made by the DPR Korea to share the Games. He added that the whole world would be focusing its attention on the outcome of the meetings and that the IOC should be seen as doing its best to facilitate some sort of agreement between the two Koreas.

THE ADMINISTRATOR stated that, although the IOC had to honour its obligations towards Seoul, the IOC must do its utmost to present a proposal that was reasonable and acceptable to the parties involved.
In response to a question, THE PRESIDENT stated that the IOC member from the DPR Korea had not commented when the Games had been awarded to Seoul. Instead, the member had simply left the room.

SHEIK AL-SABAH said that the IOC had to respect the “Olympic Charter” and had to do its best to protect the Olympic Games. He added that the IOC members who had voted for Seoul in Baden-Baden in 1981 had been aware of this potential problem with the DPR Korea.

SHEIK AL-SABAH pointed out that the statements made by the two NOCs earlier that morning were “in opposite directions”. He mentioned that the IOC hid done well in bringing the two sides together for the meeting and added that it would be excellent if it could encourage the two Korean NOCs to reach some sort of agreement.

MR. BEITZ stated that the proposal by the NOC of the DPR Korea to divide the Games between Pyongyang and Seoul was not acceptable to the IOC. The NOC of the Republic Korea had not made any counter-proposal to the proposal put forth by the NOC of the DPR Korea.

MR. SIPERCO commented that the IOC had to act in conformity with the “Olympic Charter”. He stated that the parties had to reach some sort of compromise. However, in light of the extremely divergent statements that had been made earlier that morning by the two NOCs, there was not yet any basis for such compromise.

MR. SIPERCO then stated his opinion, which was shared by the other IOC delegates, that the IOC needed some sort of counter-proposal from the NOC of the Republic of Korea upon which to base further negotiations.
After discussion, the IOC delegates unanimously decided to reverse the order of the separate meetings to be held that afternoon between the IOC and the two NOCs, namely that the IOC would first meet with the NOC of the Republic of Korea at 15h00 and then with the NOC of the DPR Korea at 17h00.

THE ADMINISTRATOR then left the room to so inform the heads of each of the Korean delegations.

THE PRESIDENT listed some areas in which the Republic of Korea might have been willing to make concessions: These areas related to:

i) the teams from each Korea marching together during the opening ceremony;

ii) DPR Korea being invited to stage some cultural events during the Games;

iii) the staging of some minor events, or qualifying rounds of certain team events, in the DPR Korea.

MR. SIPERCO then raised the issue of whether the NOC of the Republic of Korea was opposed to the holding of finals in some minor sports in the DPR Korea.

THE ADMINISTRATOR re-entered the room and announced that the two NOCs had been notified of the order of their meetings with the IOC.


The proposal by the NOC of the DPR Korea with respect to the naming of the Games was then debated.

MR. BEITZ stated, with the general agreement of the others, that it was neither realistic nor practical to try to prevent the Games being referred to as the “Seoul” Games.

SHEIK AL-SABAH felt that the NOC of the DPR Korea could justify its boycott of the Games should they be held exclusively in Seoul.

THE PRESIDENT stated that the NOC of the DPR Korea should be told that the IOC was trying to find the best conditions that could be offered by the NOC of the Republic of Korea under which the former could fully participate in the Games. The IOC could then present to the DPR Korea the anticipated counter-proposal from the NOC of the Republic of Korea.

THE PRESIDENT adjourned the meeting at 11h35.

The meeting resumed at 15.00 hours.

THE PRESIDENT welcomed representatives of the IOC and delegates from the NOC of the Republic of Korea to a separate consultation. He emphasised that the Olympic Games had been awarded in the year 1981 to the city of Seoul and that the IOC would honour its obligations with respect to the “Olympic Charter” and to the contract signed by the IOC with the NOC of the Republic of Korea and the city of Seoul.

However, it was necessary to bear in mind that, since Korea was a divided country, the active participation of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea in the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad should be promoted in the greatest possible degree. THE PRESIDENT requested that the Presi dent of the Korean Olympic Committee comment on any proposals he might have in this respect.

MR. CHONG-HA KIM, President of the KOC , declared that facilities for the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad were well advanced and that a detailed competition schedule had been drawn up, approval from the IFs had been obtained and results communicated to the IOC. It was therefore no straightforward matter to change plans which had been finalised, quite apart from the question of adherence to the “Olympic Charter”.

Nevertheless, the SLOOC was prepared to consider the allocation of some handball and volleyball preliminaries to the Democratic People’s Repulic of Korea. In agreement with the IHF, the SLOOC had already designated competition and training sites for handball which were in conformity with IF official regulations. Preliminaries were to take place from 20th - 28th September, with finals being held from 29th - 1st October. MR. KIM proposed that, out of a total of 42 men’s s and women’s preliminary matches, the 30 men’s preliminary rounds should be held in the DPR Korea.

As for volleyball, 12 men’s and 8 women’s teams would participate. The FIVB had agreed to the schedule fixed for 17th September - 2nd October. However, it would be possible to study the question of allocating 30 preliminary men’s matches in volleyball, again from a total of 42 men’s and women’s preliminary rounds, to the DPR Korea. Finals would be held in Seoul, as for handball.


MR. KIM wished to point out that it would firstly be necessary to gain the approval of the IFs and of the IOC before such a proposal could be implemented. In addition, such matters as access to competition sites, transportation, communication networks and security should be fully investigated.


THE PRESIDENT wondered whether the President of the KOC had any proposals regarding football competitions.

MR. KIM declared that the KOC was willing to consider suggestions with respect to football. He explained that 16 teams would participate, with four groups in the preliminary rounds playing a total of 24 matches. Finals and semi-finals would be held in Seoul at the main venue, but other matches would be played in various stadia outside the city. Competition would take place from 17th September – 1st October; approval from the FIFA had also been obtained. The KOC would review the possibility of allocating two groups from the preliminary rounds to stadia in the DPR Korea, i.e. 12 preliminary matches.

THE PRESIDENT requested Mr. Kim to comment on any proposals with respect to individual sports.

MR. KIM referred to the 180 km. cycling event. This competition would take place on 18th September, the day following the opening ceremony of the Games, with the participation of 35 countries, 160 cyclists and 70 officials. Perhaps this race could be staged in such a way as to link the Republic of Korea and the DPR Korea.

A road of at least 100 km. was required; the general practice was to hold a “round-trip” race. However, it would be possible for cyclists to begin the race in the DPR Korea and to cycle to Seoul. Cooperation between the two NOCs in organising this event would symbolise the genuine effort towards understanding and peaceful reunification.


As for the opening ceremony, an event of great significant since it gathered together all peoples, irrespective of race, religion and ideology, MR. KIM advocated the simultaneous entry into the stadium of athletes representing the two NOCs.

THE PRESIDENT requested clarification as to whether athletes would wear different uniforms and enter under separate flags.

MR. KIM explained that six columns would march into the stadium athletes from the KOC would march on the right hand side, with athletes from the DPR Korean NOC on the left hand side. Teams would march under separate flags, wearing the uniform of their NOC. For the closing ceremony Korean athletes would also be represented by separate flags.

THE PRESIDENT drew the attention of the meeting to the importance of the cultural progamme; it would perhaps be beneficial to invite the DPR Korea to participate in the cultural programme in Seoul.

A pause of ten minutes ensued.

MR. KIM felt that cultural events formed a significant part of the Olympic Games.


The KOC heartily welcomed active participation from the DPR Korea in cultural festivals which would add to the diversity and success of the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad.

He underlined that officials and teams from the DPR Korea would have no difficulties regarding entry and participation in the Games.

The Olympic Games were awarded to a city and not to a country, and therefore competitions should, in principle, be held in Seoul. However, it was inevitable that some events should take place in stadia outside Seoul, but generally in areas within the control of the NOC to which the Games had been granted. Should some preliminary events be held in the DPR Korea, special authorisation would have to be sought from the IOC. IN addition, it would be essential for competent bodies to review facilities such as competition venues, transportation systems and so on before the KOC requested final approval from the IOC authorities for such a scheme.

MR. KIM advised extreme caution in all reports released to the press, in view of the delicate situation.

THE PRESIDENT stated that the official press conference would take place at 18.00 hours the following day. He himself would issue a report, subsequent to further talks with the delegations from both NOCs.

He expressed appreciation to the KOC for the willingness to cooperate and review the possibility of granting some preliminary matches in volleyball; handball and football to the DPR Korea, as well as running the 180 km. cycling event from North to South Korea and ensuring simultaneous entry of Korean athletes into the Olympic Stadium on the occasion of the opening ceremony.

Participation of the DPR Korean NOC in the cultural programme would also prove very valuable.

He pointed out that, should some competitions be held in the DPR Korea, this might pose problems with regard to event coordination, which would have to be carefully examined should and initial agreement be reached.

THE PRESIDENT mentioned that the spirit of cooperation which existed between the KOC and the IOC was working towards the benefit of the entire Olympic Movement. He stressed the necessity of proving willingness to reach an agreement and promote maximum NOC participation at the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad.



THE PRESIDENT welcomed the delegation from the NOC of the DPR Korea to the meeting at 17h10. He thanked them for the kind and encouraging words they had expressed that morning regarding the IOC and of the Olympic Movement. THE PRESIDENT knew Mr. Yu Sun Kim as not only the President of the NOC and as an IOC member but also as a friend. He was aware of the role of the DPR Korea had played in sport, having visited the country on two occasions, and of the importance of sport in the DPR Korea. The IOC realised that the NOC supported and respected the Olympic Movement and the “Olympic Charter”.


The IOC delegation had carefully studied the NOC’s proposals, but could not accept t hem as they were contrary to the “Olympic Charter”. In Baden-Baden in 1981, the IOC had voted to award the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad in Seoul. The IOC now had to stand by its decision, and to respect the contract signed with the NOC of the Republic of Korea and the city of Seoul.

Nevertheless, the presence of the delegation from the NOC of the DPR Korea was important for the IOC as it demonstrated that the NOC were realistic, and wished to obtain the best possible conditions for participation in the Games. It had been for this reason that the IOC had convened a meeting of the two NOCs, under the aegis of the IOC itself.


The IOC delegation now wished to know the NOC’s position. The IOC could not accept the NOC’s proposals, but might envisage the organisation of some events in North Korea. However, first of all the IOC wished to know if the NOC were ready to discuss such a solution, a solution which would provide the best conditions for the participation of a team from the NOC of the DPR Korea in the 1988 Olympic Games.

MR. YU SUN KIM stated that at the meeting that morning he had raised the matter of the joint hosting of the Games in North and South Korea. He wished to provide additional explanations to the NOC’s proposal for joint hosting.

The proposal had been submitted in order to contribute to the success of the Games and to encourage unity between North and South Korea, leading to a peaceful re-unification of the nation.

The NOC’s proposal was designed to help the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad and to promote the Olympic Movement.

MR. KIM stated that no one could deny that the designation of Seoul as venue for the 1988 Olympic Games had led to divided opinion as hosting of the Games by one part of the nation aggravated the antagonism and division between the two peoples.

In fact, many countries were considering refusing to send teams to the Games. Support for the Games had, however, been voiced. Thus the joint hosting of the Games would encourage a greater participation in the 1988 Olympic Games, and it was hoped the largest ever participation in Olympic history.

It was the delegation’s view that the joint proposal would prevent division within the Olympic Movement, and would on the contrary further the Movement’s development. MR. KIM felt that the proposal for joint hosting of the Games reflected the reality of his country.

If the name of the Olympic Games was to be conducive to the re-unification of Korea, thus involving the whole of the country, the NOC of the DPR Korea would prefer the joint games to be called the “Korea Olympic Games” or the “Pyongyang/Seoul Olympic Games”. In this way unity would be encouraged, not division. The proposal for the joint hosting of the Games had been made taking into full consideration all conditions prevalent in North and South Korea.

MR. KIM felt that the IOC and South Korea differed little in their views with regard to the staging of the Games in North and South Korea. There were only differences of opinion regarding the number of events and disciplines. The NOC of the DPR Korea wished to stage half of the Games, having the power and the strength to “co-host” the 1988 Olympic Games.

If the Games were held in Pyongyang and Seoul a free exchange of visits was proposed. This would help to create a favourable atmosphere for the re-unification of Korea.

If athletes, officials, tourists and journalists travelled freely barriers would be broken down, and a step forward would be made towards the re-unification of the country.

In addition, the proposal for a joint North/South organising committee would encourage re-unification. Once the committee started work, visits would be increased, and unity between the peoples strengthened.


If the current meetings were fruitful, their outcome would be beneficial for the Olympic Movement and for Korea’s national interests. If an agreement were reached, this meeting would be recorded in the history of the Olympic movement.

MR. KIM believed that the IOC delegation would understand the NOC’s proposals and would consider them favourably.

THE PRESIDENT thanked Mr. Kim for his comments.

MR. KIM then stated that the NOC of the DPR Korea wished to stage the following sports: archery, judo, track and field, gymnastics, weightlifting, volleyball, table tennis, wrestling, handball, shooting and swimming.

Following a ten-minute break, THE PRESIDENT stated that on behalf of the IOC he had to repeat very clearly that the IOC could not accept the proposals presented by the delegation of the NOC of the DPR Korea since these were against the “Olympic Charter” and against the decision taken in 1981 in Baden-Baden at the IOC Session to award the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad to Seoul.


However, in order to try to provide the best possible conditions for the DPR Korea's participation in the Games in Seoul, THE PRESIDENT asked the delegation if they were ready to begin discussions with the IOC and the Republic of Korea regarding the possibility of organising some events in Pyongyang.

THE PRESIDENT wished to know the NOC’s position, stressing that if the latter required further time to consider the proposal, the IOC would be willing to grant such a request. If the NOC wished to consider the organisation of some events of the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad in Pyongyang, and were willing to discuss such a possibility both with the IOC and the delegation from the Republic of Korea, the IOC would await the NOC’s reply until the following morning.

MR. KIM responded that the IOC had initiated and organised the meeting, and the NOC had thus started its discussions regarding the various problems. That was the reason why the NOC had enumerated its proposals that morning, and held separate discussions with the IOC that afternoon. As the President of the IOC had stated that some of the events could be staged in Pyongyang, the NOC had considered that the IOC agreed to the Games being shared between the DPR Korea and the Republic of Korea. That was the reason why the NOC had officially proposed that it could stage certain events, and why a joint meeting had been arranged. If the games were not held jointly, MR. KIM felt that the “Olympic Charter” would be contravened.

In order to ensure the success of the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad, the realities of MR. KIM’s country had to be borne in mind. The NOC’s proposals had thus been reasonable and rational, and it was requested that the IOC delegation re-consider such proposals.

THE PRESIDENT reiterated that the IOC delegation had studied the NOC’s proposals very carefully, and could not accept them. Seoul had been chosen to host the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad during the 1981Session in Baden-Baden, and the IOC did not have the power to alter such a decision. Thus no joint Games could be held as this would contravene the “Olympic Charter”. However, the IOC was asking the NOC of the DPR Korea if it was ready to discuss the possibility of organising some events in the DPR Korea. If the NOC required time to study such a proposal, the IOC was willing to grant this.


MR. KIM replied that the NOC had proposed which kind of events it wished and was able to host. It was hoped that the IOC would study this proposal once more. MR. KIM requested further time to consider the IOC’s suggestions, and stated that the NOC would provide the IOC with a reply the following morning.

THE PRESIDENT remarked that he understood that the NOC would study the IOC’s proposal regarding the possibility of certain events being staged in the DPR Korea, and had requested time until the following morning to do so. He proposed that the meeting re-convene at 09h30 on 9th October 1985.


MR. CHUNG GUK CHIN, Vice-President of the NOC of the DPR Korea, thought that in his opinion both the IOC and the NOC should re-consider each party's proposal prior to the following morning’s meeting.

The meeting adjourned at 17h50.



Wednesday, 9th October 1985

The meeting opened at 09h35.

THE PRESIDENT made delegates from the NOC of the DPR of Korea welcome. He explained the standpoint of the IOC, making clear that it was not possible for the International Olympic Committee to accept the proposal submitted the previous day by the NOC of the DPR Korea. Such a suggestion was in contradiction with the “Olympic Charter” and with the decision taken by the IOC at the 1981 Baden-Baden Congress. Nevertheless, it would be possible to consider the organisation of some Olympic events In Pyongyang. This and other conditions which would promote the participation of the DPR Korea in the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad could be discussed, if delegates were willing to study these.

MR. YU SUN KIM, President of the Olympic Committee of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, reiterated his conviction that the most efficient way of making the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad fully successfully was the co-hosting of the Games by both the NOCs of the Republic of Korea and the DPR of Korea. This would further trust and understanding amongst the Korean nations. He felt that the Baden-Baden decision had not taken sufficiently into account the realities of the situation in Korea. The “Olympic Charter” indeed expressed the aims of the Olympic Movement and the Olympic Ideals. The letter of this “Charter’ was, however, in his view, of lesser importance and was not always strictly adhered to. The Games of the XVIth Olympiad, for example, had been jointly hosted by Melbourne and Stockholm, and during the Games of the XXIIIrd Olympiad there had been two Olympic villages, whereas the “Charter” stipulated that there should be a single Olympic village.

The Games of the XXIVth Olympiad should be those of reunification, dispelling misunderstanding and promoting good relations, aims which were in full accord with the ideals of the Olympic Movement. MR. KIM therefore felt that the proposal from his NOC for the co-hosting of the Games by North and South Korea, should be reconsidered as it reflected Olympic ideals of peace, harmony and friendship.


He was grateful for this opportunity to express his views and was convinced that the meeting would yield fruitful results.
THE PRESIDENT stressed that the above proposal for the Games to be jointly hosted by Pyongyang and Seoul was not acceptable to the IOC. The Games had been granted to Seoul and should be organised by Seoul. However, certain agreements could be reached in order that all Koreans should participate to the greatest possible extent in these Games. The KOC and the IOC were prepared to consider the organisation of certain Olympic events in Pyongyang, a contribution to the Seoul cultural programme by the DPR Korea, and a joint parade of Korean athletes on the occasion of the opening ceremony of the Games. Such proposals could be formulated and submitted in written form during the next few days. Thus, at a subsequent meeting the NOC of the DPR Korea could present its reactions.

MR. KIM was of the opinion that the proposal for co-hosting the Games should be further studied, as well as those suggestions to which the President of the IOC had referred.

The meeting adjourned at 10h10 and resumed at 10h20.



THE PRESIDENT stated that the purpose of the meeting between the two Koreas and the IOC was to examine how best to promote the participation of all Koreans in the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad.

The IOC rejected the proposal for joint hosting of the Games. However, it was possible to forward a letter to the NOC of the DPR Korea advancing certain ideas which would involve the DPR Korea more actively in the Games of the Olympiad. Such suggestions could be studied by the NOC and comments brought up at a future date. A further meeting could be arranged for 8th - 9th January 1986.

In his turn, MR. KIM stressed that the primary aim of this meeting was to foster the sound development of the Olympic Movement and to examine the realities of the situation of a divided Korea. This was the reason for the proposal advanced by his NOC and full explanations had been given. Naturally, however, the NOC would be pleased to study ideas put forward by the IOC and would communicate its reactions at a later meeting.

THE PRESIDENT informed the meeting that there would be a joint gathering of delegates from the two NOCs at l5h00 and at 18h00 a press conference would be given. He invited the President of the NDC of the DPR Korea to attend, should he so wish.

The delegation from the NOC of the DPR Korea left the meeting at 10h30.



THE PRESIDENT welcomed the delegation from the NOC of the Republic of Korea to their second meeting with the IOC delegation at 11h00.

The meeting had been proceeding smoothly and in a friendly atmosphere, although the position of the NOC of the DPR Korea was very different that of the IOC. The NOC of the DPR Korea had made a proposal containing different points which could not be accepted by the IOC since this contravened the “Olympic Charter” and decisions taken by the IOC since 1981 regarding the awarding of the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad to Seoul.

Following the meeting between the delegations of the IOC and of the Korean Olympic Committee, the IOC had proposed to the NOC of the DPR Korea that the latter organise certain events, parade jointly with the team fielded by the Korean Olympic Committee during the opening and closing ceremonies, and also take part in the cultural programme.

However, THE PRESIDENT felt that this had not been the right moment for the NOC of the DPR Korea to discuss such a proposal. The IOC had therefore decided to send a letter containing these proposals to the NOC of the DPR Korea during October 1985, and also suggesting another meeting between delegations from the IOC and the NOCs of the Republic of Korea and of the DPR Korea on 8th and 9th January 1986 in Lausanne.

THE PRESIDENT wished to raise two questions. Firstly, he queried whether the Korean Olympic Committee had studied the possibility of fielding a joint team for participation in the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad. It was known that talks had been held during recent years regarding a joint team, but the IOC wished to know the KOC’s opinion in this respect.

Secondly, before the IOC wrote to the NOC of the DPR Korea, the fomer wished to explore the possibility with the Korean Olympic Committee of offering additional events to the NOC of the DPR Korea.

Before replying to the above questions, MR. CHONG-HA KIM, President of the Korean Olympic Committee, thanked the President of the IOC for his hospitality the previous evening and for his gift which would be presented to the Olympic Museum to be set up in Seoul to commemorate the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad. MR. KIM hoped that the current good weather would be conducive to a positive outcome of the meeting.

With regard to a single team, MR. KIM stated that this matter had been discussed continuously between the Republic of Korea and the DPR Korea. The first meeting had been held in June 1981 when the Korean Olympic Committee had suggested sports exchanges between the two countries in order to establish close relations, and had also proposed fielding a single team. However, no reply had been received from the representatives of the DPR Korea until five months before the Games of the XXIIIrd Olympiad in Los Angeles, at which time it had not been possible to enter a joint team. Three other unsuccessful meetings had also been held.

MR. KIM recalled that the NOCs from the Socialist countries and the USSR had boycotted the 1984 Olympic Games, and the NOC of the DPR Korea had stated that it would never discuss the question of a single team with the NOC of the Republic of Korea.


Nevertheless, if the IOC recommended such a solution, and the NOC of the DPR Korea agreed, the Korean Olympic Committee would discuss the matter directly with the NOC of the DPR Korea once they returned home.
MR. KIM felt that, in consideration of the statements made by the NOC of the DPR Korea, a single team would mean to the DPR Korea c-hosting of the 1988 Olympic Games and the NOC would come that they were organising half of these Games.

Apart from this concern, the Korean Olympic Committee wished to consider the IOC’s proposal as it was serious in nature, and the KOC was ready to discuss it with the NOC of the DPR Korea.

The IOC had asked the KOC to consider allowing the NOC of the DPR Korea to organise more events. However, the KOC did not wish to offer any additional events as the NOC of the DPR Korea would only be satisfied with organising exactly half of the Games.

THE PRESIDENT assured that a copy of the letter of the NOC of the DPR Korea would be sent to the Korean Olympic Committee.


Furthermore, THE PRESIDENT wished to know if the Korean Olympic Committee would accept the IOC’s invitation to meet again on 8th and 9th January 1986 in Lausanne in order to discuss the proposals to be include in the IOC’s letter.
THE PRESIDENT confirmed to Mr. Kim that the meeting would be held between the IOC and delegations from both NOCs. Moreover, the IOC would consult the KOC before proposing the organisation of additional events to the NOC of the DPR Korea.

THE PRESIDENT reiterated that the IOC’s position was very clear. It had to respect the “Olympic Charter” and the decisions taken since 1981. The Games of the XXIVth Olympiad had been awarded to Seoul and would be held there. However, the IOC was now trying to offer something to the NOC of the DPR Korea to enable the latter to take part in the 1988 Olympic Games, and this was the main aim of the current meeting.

MR. KIM appreciated the President’s confirmation that the IOC would respect the “Olympic Charter” and the decisions taken regarding the choice of Seoul as venue for the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad. Seoul had been given the right to host the Games and would honour their obligations. The Korean Olympic Committee would offer something to the NOC of the DPR Korea in order to pay tribute to the efforts of the President of the IOC to ensure wide participation in the Games.

If the NOC of the DPR Korea respected the “Olympic Charter” and the decision taken in 1981 awarding the Games to Seoul, MR. KIM assured that the KOC would participate in tri-lateral talks in January 1986.

THE PRESIDENT concluded that a joint meeting of all 3 parties would be held at 15h00 that afternoon. He would then be giving a press conference at 18h00 to which he invited Mr. Chong Ga Kim. Mr. Yu Sun Kim, President of the NOC of the DPR Korea, had also been invited.

MR. KIM confirmed his agreement with the schedule.

The meeting adjourned at 11h10.



The meeting between the IOC delegates, representatives of the NOC of the Republic of Korea and the NOC of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea resumed at 15h00.


THE PRESIDENT thanked the KOC delegation and the DPR of Korea NOC delegation, especially their respective presidents, Mr. Chong-Ha Kim and Mr. Yun Sun Kim, for their constructive attitude during negotiations. He felt sure that this meeting would prove useful towards obtaining an agreement in order that all Koreans should be involved in the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad.


THE PRESIDENT gave the floor to the Presidents of the delegations before making his final statement.

MR. YU SUN KIM, President of the NOC of the DPR of Korea, made a declaration, (annex 4).
MR. CHONG-HA KIM, President of the NOC of the Republic of Korea, stated that it had been a great honour to attend the North-South sports talks held under the aegis of the International Olympic Committee. He would like to express his sincere thanks to the IOC representatives and to the delegation from the DPR of Korea who had attend this meeting in a very serious manner.

His delegation had made very clear that the hosting of the Games of the XXIVth Olympiad had been established in accordance with the “Olympic Charter”, through appropriate IOC procedures.

The Korean Olympic Committee firmly believed that all the Korean people should participate in the Olympic Games, 1988. Within the framework of the “Olympic Charter”, the KOC was prepared to allocate some Olympic events to the DPR of Korea. He sincerely hoped that the DPR of Korea NOC would respond in a positive manner to such a gesture and that successful dialogue would ensue. Although no final agreement had been reached, he expressed the wish that all Koreans should be able to honourably participate in the Games to be hosted by the Korean Olympic Committee.

MR. KIM expressed his heartfelt appreciation to President Samaranch as well as his sincere wish for the everlasting development of the Olympic Movement.

THE PRESIDENT referred to the fact that a further joint meeting between the two NOCs and the IOC delegates would be held on 8th and 9th January 1986. Later during the month of October a letter would be sent to both NOCs explain the procedure for this meeting.


The IOC would work towards the most appropriate means of reaching a positive agreement, acceptable to both NOCs and which all the Korean people would find satisfactory.

THE PRESIDENT thanked both NOC delegations for the friendly atmosphere in which the two-day meeting had taken place.
The press conference would be held at 18h00 and the Presidents of both NOCs were invited to attend. The IOC would issue a press release, which expressed the standpoint of the IOC alone, and he went on to inform the meeting of the content of the report (annex 5).

The meeting was declared closed at 15h20.



ANNEX 1
IOC DELEGATION

H.E. Mr. Juan Antonio SAMARANCH (President of the IOC)
Mr. Alexandru SIPERCO (1st Vice-President of the IOC)
Mr. Berthold BEITZ (3rd Vice-President of the IOC)
Sheik Fahad Al-Ahmad AL-SABAH (IOC member and President of the Olympic Council of Asia)
Mr. Raymond GAFNER (IOC member and Ad interim administrator of the IOC)

KOREA NOC DELEGATION

Mr. Chong-Ha KIM President of the Korean Olympic Committee
Mr. Choong-Sik CHANG Vice-President of the Korean Olympic Committee
Mr. Man-Lip CHOY Vice-President of the Korean Olympic Committee
Mr. Chong-Ha LEE Member of the Korean Olympic Committee
Mr. Tae-Soon YIM Member of the Korean Olympic Committee
Mr. Joung-Moon NAM Member of the Korean Olympic Committee


DPR KOREA NOC DELEGATION

Mr. Yu Sun KIM President of the Olympic Committee of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea
Mr. Chung Guk CHIN Vice-President of the Olympic Committee of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea
Mr. Chang On HAN Member of the Olympic Committee of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea
Mr. Bok Man AN Member of the Olympic Committee of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea
Mr. Ung CHANG Assistant Secretary General of the Olympic Committee of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea
Mr. Myong Hwang CHO Member of the Olympic Committee of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea



ANNEX 2
STATEMENT BY MR. YU SUN KIM,
PRESIDENTOF THE NOC OF THE DPR KOREA

It is a great pleasure for me to note that the sincere efforts on the part of the respected IOC President Mr. Samaranch for the success of the 24th Olympic Games have today brought together here the delegation of the IOC and the delegations of the National Olympic Committees of the north and south of Korea for the consultation on matters of mutual concern.

On behalf of the National Olympic Committee of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, I would like, first of all, to express our gratitude to the IOC President Mr. Samaranch and other distinguished members of the IOC delegation for this arrangement.

At the same time, I wish to warmly welcome, in the spirit of fervent compatriotic love, the fellow delegates from the south now present here with us.

We are here today to resolve the complicated problems facing the 24th Olympics and search for a break-through solution.

It is common knowledge that the serious differences of views and crisis of a possible split have come up with regard to the venue of the 24th Olympic Games. This contains such an inneglectable [sic] element which is likely to adversely affect the future development of the Olympic Movement.

The Olympic Movement has been a symbol of peace, friendship and cooperation amongst the peace-loving peoples and sportsmen throughout the world. They have promoted the spirits of understanding, trust, friendship, peace and cooperation through the Olympic Games, thereby contributing towards world peace and unity of all peoples.

The lofty ideal of the Olympic Movement is also in accord with the will and desire or our people for national concord and trust of the north and south and for peace and peaceful reunification of the country.

That is why we have respected the ideals and principle of the Olympic Movement for peace, friendship and cooperation and made our strenuous efforts to contribute to this Movement.

As President Samaranch knows, our nation, that had lived harmoniously as a homogenous nation boasting of the 5,000-year-long time-honoured history and culture, has been suffering from the immeasurable misfortunes and agonies because of the tragic division for over 40 years.

The north and south are the two parts of our artificially divided country, and the compatriots of the north and south are of the single-blooded kindred and brotherhood.

It is only the one expanse of the 3,000-ri homeland that constantly occupies the minds of our fellow countrymen, and their single desire envisions the reunified homeland, not partition, and the peaceful homeland free from any war.

To our regret, however, the one side of the divided Korea has been designated to host the 24th Olympic Games, contrary to the desire of our people for national unity and reunification. This has led to the situation which might future exasperate the division, antagonism and confrontation between the north and south.

Since a considerable number of the IOC members did not fully understand the specific reality of our divided country at the time of the debate on designating Seoul as the venue of the 24th Olympic Games, they must not have become aware of what difficulties it would bring to the realisation of the Korean people’s cause for reunification and what antagonism and confrontation it would entail between the north and south.

The subsequent developments have manifestly shown that the failure to take any epochal measures with regard to the 24th Olympic venue will end up with such a situation which is exceedingly harmful to the Korean people’s cause of reunification and to the sound development of the Olympic Movement.

A great number of governments and the public, the press and sports figures in many countries of the world have voiced their views that the choice of Seoul as the 24th Olympic venue is irrational and that either the alteration or the Olympic venue or any other new epochal measures will be indispensable in order to avert a serious crisis the venue problem would bring to bear.

If the Olympic Games are to take place as it is now, not a small number of countries without any “diplomatic relations” with south Korea will refuse to participate in the Games, thus bringing about a split of the Olympic Movement.

All these facts give a serious lesson that the Olympic venue is not merely a working matter of sports and that it requires further thought and consideration particularly in case of holding the Olympic Games in a divided country.

The Olympic Movement must neither spell misfortunes to any nation, nor should it foster a split and confrontation of a nation, both in view of the history of its origin and development and in the light of its lofty ideals and aims.

The National Olympic Committee of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea considers that if the 24th Olympic Games are to be successfully carried out to live up to the desire and aspiration of the justice and peace-loving peoples and sportsmen of the world, it is essential to affirm the principles suitable to the lofty Olympic ideals and take reasonable measures necessary for this.

The first principle is to make the 24th Olympic Games a successful great international festival for all countries to participate.

The second principle is to make the 24th Olympics the games of friendship and cooperation, not antagonism and confrontation, the games for detente , not tension, and the games for reunification, not split.

The third principle is to organise and hold the 24th Olympic Games in such a way that they can serve the interests of all member organisations of the international Olympic Movement and not encroach upon the interests of a certain member organisation or a few or several member organisations.

It is on these principles that we have sought and searched in various aspects for the ways and means to make the 24th Olympic Games a greatest international sports festival in conformity with the desire and demands of the world peace-loving peoples and sportsmen and with the reunification cause of the Korean people.

After the serious study and search, we have come to the conviction that the most realistic and reasonably way is for the north and south of Korea to jointly host the 24th Olympic Games.

Respecting the ideals of the Olympic Movement for peace, friendship and harmony, from the purpose to be faithful to the Olympic Charter pursuing the constant improvement, strengthening and development of the Olympic Movement and from the desire of getting rid of the anxiety of the world peace-loving peoples and sportsmen about the 24th Olympic venue, we wish to solemnly forward the following proposal to this joint meeting:


The Proposal from the Delegation of The National Olympic Committee of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea


No. 1 The Hosting of the 24th Olympic Games

The north and south will jointly host the 24th Olympic Games and field a single team of the north and south to the Games.

No. 2 The Appellation of 2Olympic Games

The Olympic Games shall be named the “Korea Olympic Games” or “Korea Pyongyang-Seoul Olympic Games”.

No. 3 The Allotment of the Disciplines

The disciplines of the Games will be allotted equally half to Pyongyang and Seoul each.

No. 4 The Opening and Closing Ceremonies of the Olympic Games

The opening and closing ceremonies for the allotted disciplines will take place respectively in Pyongyang and Seoul.

No. 5 The Host Cities’ Guarantee

It shall be guaranteed that all the necessary preparations for the 24th Olympic Games will be completed in the shortest time in compliance with the rules and byelaws of the International Olympic Committee and International Sports Federations.

No. 6 The Free Exchange of Visits

a) Adequate conditions will be provided for the athletes, officials, journalists and tourists to freely travel between Pyongyang and Seoul by land, sea and air.


b) For such a free exchange of visits, roads and railways will be connected between Pyongyang and Seoul, and passenger liner service will open to traffic between the Nampo Port linked with Pyongyang by highways and the Inchon Port linked with Seoul by highways.


c) For the maximum convenience and expeditious travels, passes will be issued by the respective sides at the crossing points, instead of visas, for the athletes, officials, journalist and tourists entering the respective areas of the north and south.


d) The authorities concerned of the north and south will issue in advance their respective statements on guaranteeing the security for travelers and carry them out.

No. 7 The Televising Rights and Allotment of Profits

The televising rights will depend on the contract and the profits from the televising rights will be allotted reasonably through consultations.

No. 8 The Formation of a Standing Body for the Joint Hosting of the Olympic Games

a) A north-south joint standing body will be organised for the successful joint hosting of the 24th Olympic Games.


b) The north-south joint standing body will be named the “Joint Organising Committee of the Korea Olympic Games” or the “Joint Organising Committee of the Korea Pyongyang-Seoul Olympic Games”.


c) The above-mentioned Joint Organising Committee will consist of the two Co-Chairmen representing the north and south respectively and of a necessary number of its standing members.

No. 9 Other Business

Other details will be separately worked out for agreement of views.

No. 10 The Documentation of Agreement

A document of agreement will be drawn up on the north-south joint hosting of the 24th Olympic Games and entering a single team into the Games.

We have solid material and technical foundations for jointly hosting the 24th Olympic Games and adequate sports facilities and conditions, including the already expensively built gymnasiums and stadiums.

Our proposal on the north-south joint hosting of the 24th Olympic Games is the most appropriate and realistic proposal for the successful Olympics on the basis of the serious consideration of the situation of the Olympic Movement and the realities of our divided country.

This proposal is not only in full accord with the lofty ideal and principles of the Olympic Movement aimed at peace and friendship, harmony and cooperation but also reflects our sincere position to glorify the Olympic Games as the greatest sports festival without any turns and twists.

This proposal will help to remove the antagonism and confrontation between the north and south of Korea and have an encouraging influence on national unity, detente and reunification and have a positive effect on the on-going north-south talks in several fields. It will also facilitate the solution of the problem of forming a single team of the north and south to enter the international games.

This proposal will also help to enable those countries, which have been considering their participation in the 24th Olympic Games, to send their national team to the same without let or hindrance, and to prevent the possible split of the Olympic Movement.

In one word, our proposal on the north-south joint hosting of the 24th Olympic Games, when realised, will bring about an unprecedented turn in the realization of the Korean people’s cause of reunification and in the strengthening and development of the Olympic Movement, and it will be a historical event recording a new exploit in the history of the Olympic Movement.

We hope that the IOC delegation and the Olympic Committee delegation of the south will express their deep understanding and positively respond to our proposal.