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Digital Archive International History Declassified

October 23, 1962

TELEGRAM FROM MEXICAN FOREIGN MINISTRY TO MEXICAN EMBASSY, RIO DE JANEIRO

This document was made possible with support from the Leon Levy Foundation

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    A telegram from the Mexican Foreign Ministry to the Mexican Embassy in Brazil describing a United States resolution was approved. The resolution contains two fundamental points: that Soviet bases in Cuba will be dismantled, and that authorization was given for member states to adopt individual or collective measures including the use of armed force. The resolution was voted for in parts and Mexico, Brazil, and Bolivia abstained from voting on the second part. The impression of the Mexican Foreign Ministry is that the present international situation is of great seriousness.
    "Telegram from Mexican Foreign Ministry to Mexican Embassy, Rio de Janeiro," October 23, 1962, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, Archivo Histórico Diplomático Genaro Estrada, Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores, Mexico City. Obtained by James Hershberg, translated by Eduardo Baudet and Tanya Harmer. http://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/115199
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Telegram for coding [Telegrama para cifra]

Number:

From: DIPL

To: III/210/72911/31558

Mexico, D. F., 23 October 1962

[To Amb. Alfonso] García Robles

Embamex

Rio de Janiero, Brasil

52226

Referring to your telephone conversation this morning.[1] Mexican representative at the Organization of American States [OAS] Council voted in favor of calling the Organ of Consultation and in keeping with our information [the] Brazilian representative did the same. In this afternoon’s session a United States resolution was approved that contains two fundamental points to know[:] first […] is that Soviet bases in Cuba will be dismantled[;] second, authorization [was given] for member states to adopt individual or collective measures including the use of armed force. The resolution was voted for in parts and Mexico, Brazil, and Bolivia abstained from [the] second part. In the block vote Mexico and Brazil voted in favor (there were no abstentions or votes against) with the Mexican representative having raised the caveat relating to the constitutional limitations of facilitating executive power. Our representative has maintained close contact with [the] Brazilian representative. Our impression is that the present international situation is of great seriousness.

Relations [Relaciones]

[1] Ed note: See related document, Memorandum of Telephone Conversation between Mexican Foreign Ministry official and Mexican Ambassador to Brazil, 23 October 1962.