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Digital Archive International History Declassified

November 02, 1956

CABLE FROM THE CHINESE FOREIGN MINISTRY, ‘ON OUR ATTITUDE TOWARDS HUNGARY’

This document was made possible with support from the MacArthur Foundation, Leon Levy Foundation

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    The Chinese Foreign Ministry says that "'much listening, little speaking' is necessary” with regards to the Hungarian Revolution.
    "Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, ‘On Our Attitude towards Hungary’," November 02, 1956, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, PRC FMA 109-01041-01, 45-46. Obtained by Péter Vámos and translated by Péter Vámos and Gwenyth A. Jones. http://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/119977
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To the Embassy in Hungary:

We have received your telegram of 28 October.

(1) We received 48 telegrams between 22 and 31 [October] from the Embassy (some telegrams arrived late). It is good that you use different means to report on the situation to China.

(2) At present the Hungarian situation is rather complicated, to the outside, “much listening, little speaking” is necessary, do not express opinions rashly. The Embassy staff must increase vigilance, they should be calm and careful, seldom go out, and must restrict movements.

(3) If there are shared activities with the embassies of fraternal countries, you may participate. In connection with the Polish embassy’s proposal to congratulate the new government, the position of the Soviet Union and other fraternal countries’ embassies must be acknowledged first, and you must not jointly act alone with Poland.

(4) Our government has already issued a statement on the Soviet declaration on the fortification of the foundations of friendship and cooperation with other socialist countries. Outward opinion must be expressed accordingly.

(5) We hope that you continue collecting materials on the new government members’ political backgrounds, parties’ activities and recommendations, and report them to the ministry.

(6) Xie Feng does not now have to come home.[1]

Foreign Ministry

2 November 1956

Received at the Office: 1 November, issued: 2 November at 10:00, sent encrypted: 2 November at 16:30

[1] It had earlier been raised that advisor Xie Feng should return to China and give an account in person on the Hungarian events to the Beijing leadership.