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Digital Archive International History Declassified

January 15, 1972

REPORT BY ETRE SáNDOR, 'NIXON'S VISIT TO BEIJING AND THE KOREAN ISSUE'

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    A report produced by the Hungarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs regarding President Park Chung Hee’s comments on US President Nixon’s negotiations with China.
    "Report by Etre Sándor, 'Nixon's visit to Beijing and the Korean issue'," January 15, 1972, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, MNL OL XIX-J-1-j É-Korea, 1972, 60. doboz, 81-146, 00394. Translated by Imre Majer. http://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/123097
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MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS

Regional Division IV

Korean Branch

Etre Sándor

TOP SECRET!

Produced in 5 copies for:

- Comrade Marjai

- Comrade Barity

- Comrade Szücsné

- Pyongyang

- Department

Record

Subject: Nixon's visit to Beijing and the Korean issue

Our embassy in Pyongyang reported that the South Korean "president" Park Chung Hee declared the following during a press conference held on the 11th of January.

"Our government is monitoring the negotiations between the USA and communist China with great care. It is obvious that during these negotiations the Korean issue will come up too. Nixon promised me by mail that, if the Korean issue arises, he will not do anything that would go against the interests of South Korea during these negotiations. I trust President Nixon that he would not do anything without our approval that would conflict with our interests. In this situation we have to conduct flexible foreign policies... We will promote commercial relations with non-hostile communist countries."

Our note:

According to the trusted statements of the DPRK's leaders, they have not received any information so far from the Chinese leaders on the topics of their negotiations with Nixon. Considering this and the quote above, it is evident with what purpose a high-ranking Korean delegation, perhaps lead by Kim Il Sung, might travel to China in the near future. Naturally the leaders of the DPRK want to receive an appropriate guarantee from the Chinese leaders concerning the reunification policy, and furthermore win the support of other friendly countries as well.

(See: Korean leaders planned foreign trips.)

Budapest, 1972 January 15.