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Digital Archive International History Declassified

June 05, 1963

POLITICAL REPORT ON MEXICO FOR MAY 1963, SHIV KUMAR, SECOND SECRETARY, EMBASSY OF INDIA, MEXICO CITY. 'DENUCLEARIZED ZONE'

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    Although the Mexican denuclearization plan for Latin America has won appreciation from Secretary-General U Thant, some Latin American countries were tepid in their response.
    "Political Report on Mexico for May 1963, Shiv Kumar, Second Secretary, Embassy of India, Mexico City. 'Denuclearized Zone'," June 05, 1963, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, File: HI/10/2(77)/63. Obtained by Ryan Musto. http://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/123928
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Political Report on Mexico for May 1963

SECRET

By Bag A

No. 1(SP)/63

DATE: June 5, 1963

FROM: Shiv Kumar, Second Secretary, Embassy of India, Mexico City

TO: Foreign Secretary, Ministry of External Affairs

Denuclearized Zone: Although the Mexican denuclearization plan for Latin America (see paragraph 4 of our April report) has won appreciation from Secretary-General U Thant, some Latin American countries were tepid in their response. “In accordance with its specific instructions, El Salvador would see it with satisfaction if a world arrangement against the atomic threat is reached and, particularly, if the generous initiative of Mexico, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile and Ecuador to sign an agreement converting Latin America into a denuclearized zone is promoted,” wrote the President of El Salvador to President Lopez Mateos in a telegram. The Honduran President was equally lukewarm in his reply to the Mexican President: “My Government applauds the purposes which inspired such a declaration” (referring to the declaration of the Five) “but I consider it convenient to consult other Central American Governments on this to be able to act harmoniously.” The attitude of the Colombia Government was actually cold: “Colombia will not specify its position until consultations with other countries of the hemisphere are completed,” said the Colombian Foreign Minister in a press interview.