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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • April 20, 1950

    Cable from Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'On the Repatriation of Korean Nationals in China'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry reports on procedures for repatriating Koreans and Japanese living in China.

  • November 24, 1950

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Report on Negotiations regarding the Tibet issue between China and India'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry reports on the Sino-Indian Negotiation over Tibet, and claims that India intends to interfere in the PRC's internal affairs.

  • June 27, 1954

    Telegram, PRC Foreign Ministry Administrative Office to Li Kenong, 3:00 p.m.

    Notification that the three bags of documents carried by Comrade Shan Daxin have arrived and will be delivered to the proper recipients.

  • June 27, 1954

    Telegram, PRC Foreign Ministry to Li Kenong

    Zhou Enlai send a telegram informing the Chinese leadership that he will stay one day longer in Burma.

  • June 29, 1954

    Telegram, PRC Foreign Ministry to Zhou Enlai

    Zhou is informed that the top secret documents are on its way to him.

  • July 02, 1954

    Telegram, PRC Foreign Ministry to Zhang Wentian, Wang Jiaxiang, and Li Kenong

    Zhou will arrive at 12:00 for the meeting.

  • July 06, 1954

    Telegram, PRC Foreign Ministry to Li Kenong, Zhang Wentian, and Wang Jiaxiang

    Zhou safely returns to Beijing.

  • July 10, 1954

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Zhou Enlai's Conversations with the Ambassadors of India, Indonesia, and Burma'

    Telegram from the Foreign Ministry to Chinese ambassadors to India, Indonesia, Burma, and Pakistan briefing on the conversations between Zhou Enlai and the ambassadors of India, Indonesia, and Burma.

  • September 04, 1954

    Chinese Foreign Ministry Intelligence Department Report on the Asian-African Conference

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry reported Indonesia’s intention to hold the Asian-African Conference, its attitude towards the Asian-African Conference, and the possible development of the Conference.

  • November 06, 1954

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, ‘Premier Zhou’s Talk with Members of Japan’s Diet’

    Zhou Enlai and Japanese Diet Members discuss Japan's relationship with the United States, the overall trends in Sino-Japanese relations, and some specific issues in Sino-Japanese relations, such as war criminals, fisheries, and communications.

  • December 09, 1954

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Receiving the Prime Ministers of India and Other Countries and Attending the Asian-African Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry informed the Chinese Ambassador to Indonesia of Beijing's eagerness to participate in the Asian-African Conference and asked him to pay attention to Indonesia's attitude on this matter.

  • December 15, 1954

    Report from the Asia Section, Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'On the Asian-African Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry reported that Indonesia’s intention to hold the Asian-African Conference was to establish a neutral, third group to counter the US and the Soviet Union. It also reported the attitudes of the invited countries and the reactions of the Western countries toward the Conference. It concluded that it would be beneficial for China to participate in the Conference and to influence the political situation in the Conference.

  • December 25, 1954

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Regarding Our Attitude towards the Afro-Asian Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry informed Chinese embassies overseas that China supported the Asian-African Conference as well as the participation of the countries with whom China had no diplomatic relation, such as Japan, the Philippines, and Thailand. China also emphasized that Chiang Kai-shek was not to be invited to the Conference.

  • December 29, 1954

    Cable from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Intelligence Department, 'The Agenda of the Five Southeast Asian Countries from the Bogor Conference and the Five Countries’ Attitudes towards China’s Participation in the Afro-Asian Conference '

    The agenda of the Bogor Conference was to determine the purposes, timing, and participants of the Asian-African Conference. The five Southeast Asian countries agreed that China and Japan should participate in the Asian-African Conference, but some countries also insisted on the participation of US allies such as Thailand and the Philippines.

  • 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'List of Problems Between China and Other Asian-African Countries'

    A list of problems between China and other Asian-African countries

  • 1955

    Information on Japan’s Participation in the Asian-African Conference

    A Chinese report on Japan's participation before the Asian-African Conference. The report observes that the Japanese public paid more attention to this conference than to the previous Bangkok conference and highlighted Tokyo's desire to cooperate with China.

  • 1955

    Report by the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Some Existing Issues in and Suggestions for the Asia-Africa Conference'

    A Chinese Foreign Ministry report on three sets of issues facing the Asian-African Conference.

  • 1955

    View of the Asian-African Conference from the Bogor Conference

  • January 16, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Draft of the Tentative Working Plan for Participating in the Asian-African Conference'

    The note stated that the Asian-African Conference could be a great contribution in establishing international peace. Among the participants, there were Chinese allies, neutral countries, and American allies. China had to isolate American power in the Conference and befriend the neutral countries. The Chinese Foreign Ministry therefore drafted the plan accordingly.

  • January 29, 1955

    Report from the First Asia Department Third Section

    The Indonesian ambassador to China handed an invitation letter and memoranda to Zhang Hanfu. This report advances some suggestions about how to reply the letter and the memoranda and how to release the related news.