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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • April 18, 1922

    Appointment of John W. Staggers as General Counsel by Syngman Rhee

    A copy of appointment of John W. Staggers as General Counsel by President Syngman Rhee in 1922

  • September 14, 1949

    Telegram from Tunkin to the Soviet Foreign Ministry in Reply to 11 September Telegram

    North Korea plans to attack South Korea, but the Soviet Foreign Ministry is skeptical about North Korea's actual military capabilities and generally disproves of North Korea's plans.

  • September 30, 1949

    Letter, from Syngman Rhee to Dr. Robert T. Oliver [Soviet Translation]

    Letter from Syngman Rhee translated into Russian. The original was likely found when the Communists seized Seoul. Syngman Rhee urges Oliver to come to South Korea to help develop the nation independent of foreign invaders and restore order to his country.

  • May 06, 1950

    Soviet Memorandum, 'The Partisan Movement in South Korea'

    Ignatyev discusses the partisan movement in the rural areas of South Korea.

  • September 02, 1950

    Telegram, from Shtykov to Vyshinky

    Shtykov passes on a memorandum to Vyshinsky written by Syngman Rhee to Dr. Robert T. Oliver.

  • January 10, 1951

    Letter, Syngman Rhee to Harold Lady

    Syngman Rhee replies to Harold Lady regarding the sale of scrap iron.

  • February 14, 1951

    Letter, President Syngman Rhee to General Coulter

    President Rhee urges General Coulter to request for US permission to allow South Korean technicians to restore and repair the war tanks that the US was going to scrap into iron. Rhee argues that these tanks are indispensable for the ROK’ s national defense. He is also willing to pay the US in cash or iron scraps to get these tanks.

  • April, 1951

    Letter, President Syngman Rhee to General Matthew Ridgway

    Syngman Rhee asks General Ridgway to expel a British reporter, Edward Hewat, for allegedly biased reporting on the "Shin-won-myun Massacre."

  • April 02, 1951

    Letter, Syngman Rhee to Lieutenant General John B. Coulter

    Syngman Rhee thanks Coulter for his birthday letter.

  • April 24, 1951

    Letter, Syngman Rhee to Lieutenant General John B. Coulter

    Regarding Lieutenant General John B. Coulter's offer to vacate the Songdo Hotel, Syngman Rhee informed him he decided that the hotel is not suitable for their purposes. Colonel Robertson would use it as the premises and Governor Yang would look for some other suitable building.

  • May 03, 1951

    Letter, President Syngman Rhee to General Coulter

    President Rhee writes to General Coulter to address the issue of prisoners of war. After stating that releasing POWs would “demoralize” Korean soldiers, Rhee expresses his concern for POWs forced to fight in the North’s side. Rhee states that “democratic-accepting” POWs can be released only after they pass a series of tests proving them to be anti-communist. Once released, these POWs can “carry their stories of fair treatment under a democratic United Nations.”

  • May 31, 1951

    Letter, Syngman Rhee to Lieutenant General John B. Coulter

    Syngman Rhee informed Lieutenant General John B. Coulter that the Minister of Defense will discuss with him the Civil Transport Corps matter to establish disciplinary procedures.

  • May 31, 1951

    Letter, Syngman Rhee to Lieutenant General John B. Coulter

    Syngman Rhee informed Lieutenant General John B. Coulter that the Cabinet has been unable to come to decision about the suggested system of procurement.

  • May 05, 1953

    Letter, Syngman Rhee to John W. Staggers

    Syngman Rhee writes about his desire to have the Korean Government participate directly in the disposition of relief funds and purchase of aid materials.

  • June 06, 1953

    Statement by President Syngman Rhee

    President Syngman Rhee strongly opposed the peace talks between the United Nations, the North Korea People’s Army, and the Chinese People’s Volunteer Army. Rhee proposed that he would accept this armistice only if the United States signed a Mutual Defense Pact and to continue to build the ROK forces after the war.

  • July 27, 1953

    The President of the Republic of Korea (Rhee) to President Eisenhower

    Rhee thanks Eisenhower for US appropriations for South Korea and congratulates him on the Korean War armistice.

  • July 27, 1953

    Notes on Visit of General Clark with President Rhee (8:30-8:55, 27 July 1953)

    General Clark tries to convince President Rhee to attend the armistice signing, emphasizing that Kim Il Sung will not be present. Ambassador Briggs then reports that President Eisenhower has approved $200 million in aid for Korean rehabilitation.

  • August 03, 1953

    Confidential Memorandum, Before Agreeing to the Armistice Agreement

    When the United States agreed to a truce talk to end the Korea War, President Syngman Rhee disapproved. He opposed the truce and tried to attack these peace proceedings through a serious of events- such as releasing thousands of prisoners of war and creating turmoil for the US government. In order to persuade Rhee to accept the armistice defense, the US dispatches Assistant Secretary of State Walter Robertson to meet with the South Korean president in a series of bargaining discussions. Eventually, under certain conditions and a mutual defense pact with the US, Rhee agrees to the armistice.

  • August 05, 1953

    Summary Record of the Conference held between President Rhee and Secretary Dulles (First Session)

    In early August of 1950, delegates from the United States and the Republic of Korea met to discuss the logistics for the forthcoming conferences centered on the creation of a strong US-ROK mutual defense treaty. The delegates also propose who can and should be present. While both sides agree that North Korea and China should be included, President Rhee advocates that due to India’s Prime Minister’s “pro-communist views,” India should not be invited.

  • August 06, 1953

    Summary Record of the Conference held between President Rhee and Secretary Dulles (Second Session)

    During the second Dulles-Rhee conference, President Rhee and Secretary Dulles led the discussion with the subject of Korean rehabilitation. Rhee makes a few suggestions that both sides should consider if Korean reconstruction should take place. These suggestions include: 1) rehabilitating Korean productive industry, 2) directly allocating money for Korea’s rehabilitation instead of doing so through the reconstruction of the Japanese economy and, 3) prevent the importation of Japanese technicians to Korea. Dulles answers he will consider Rhee suggestions, however, the US will continue to aid Japan to prevent losing her to communism.