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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • May 27, 1946

    Yugoslav Record of Conversation of I.V. Stalin and the Yugoslav Government Delegation Headed by J. Broz Tito, 27-28 May 1946

    Stalin and Tito discuss economic cooperation between Yugoslavia and the Soviet Union. Stalin advises Tito about improving the Yugoslav army and defense program and discusses the Soviet Union providing assistance in this development.

  • May 27, 1946

    Soviet Record of Conversation of Gen. I.V. Stalin with Marshal Tito, 27-28 May 1946

    Stalin and Tito discuss the economic situation of Yugoslavia and a plan for the Soviet Union providing assistance for further industrial and military development. Yugoslav foreign relations are also discussed.

  • June 22, 1954

    Letter from Nikita S. Khrushchev, First Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, to Josip Broz Tito and the Central Committee of the League of Communists Of Yugoslavia

    Letter from Soviet leader Nikita S. Khrushchev to Yugoslav leader Josep B. Tito suggesting that the time is ripe for a rapprochement between the two states and parties. Blaming former NKVD chief Lavrenty Beria and former Yugoslav leadership member Milovan Djilas for doing the work of the imperialists by attempting to drive a wedge between the Soviet and Yugoslav people and parties, Khrushchev suggests that the ousting of both will increase rapprochement between the two countries and be the catalyst for a a summit between the two leaders.

  • July 24, 1954

    Cable from the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union to Tito and Central Committee of the League Of Communists Of Yugoslavia

    Letter from the CC CPSU to the CC LCY regarding the positive response given the CC CPSU by the CC LCY concerning the 22 June 1954 Soviet letter to the Yugoslav leadership suggesting the possibility of Soviet-Yugoslav rapprochement. The Soviets also suggest that they support the Yugoslav position on the question of the city of Trieste, a disputed zone between the Yugoslavs and the Italians.

  • August 11, 1954

    Letter from Tito and the Executive Committee [Politburo] of the CC LCY to Nikita Khrushchev and Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

    Yugoslav response to Soviet approaches about normalizing relations between the two countries and the two parties. While encouraged by the Soviet gestures, the Yugoslav leadership remains cautious and suggests that the rapprochement take a slow and steady course, taking into account the differences as well as the similarities between the two countries.

  • May 10, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Comments on the Asian-African Conference from Capitalist Ruled Countries After the Asian-African Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry summarizes (predominantly) Western leaders' statements about the Bandung Conference. Secretary Dulles expressed great satisfaction with the "useful and good conference," especially its role in "checking China," while Great Britain expressed strong disapproval of China's behavior at the conference and France was "shocked" that Algeria was discussed. Israel and Australia expressed regret that they were excluded from the conference.

  • October 06, 1956

    Note from N. Khrushchev to the CPSU CC Presidium regarding conversations with Yugoslav leaders in Belgrade

    Khrushchev reports on his conversations with Tito and other Yugoslav leaders during his visit to Yugolsavia. The first conversation addressed the bread shortage in Yugoslavia, a trade agreement between the two countries and the structure of Yugoslav agriculture. The second conversation addressed Soviet-Yugoslav relations and the issues of building socialism, the international press, Marxist-Leninist policy, and Yugoslav relations with other European socialist countries.

  • October 08, 1956

    Note from N. Khrushchev to the CPSU CC Presidium regarding conversations with Yugoslav leaders in Yugoslavia

    Khrushchev describes his conversations with Josip Broz Tito during his visit to Yugoslavia. They discussed the issues of U.S. aid to Yugoslavia, the Turkish and Greek conflict over Cyprus, the expansion of contact between Soviet and Yugoslav workers and the path to socialism. Tito appeared uneasy and was dissatisfied with relations between the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia.

  • October 08, 1956

    Note from N. Khrushchev to the CPSU CC Presidium regarding conversations with Yugoslav leaders in the Crimea

    Khrushchev describes his conversations with Josip Broz Tito regarding Soviet-Yugoslav relations. The leaders discussed Yugoslavia's need for economic and technological assistance from the Soviet Union; socialist methods and ideology; alignment on international issues; and amnesty for Communist fugitives returning to Yugoslavia. Khrushchev expresses concern about the behavior of Yugoslav diplomats and the Yugoslav press. He recommends to the CPSU CC that increasing contact with Yugoslav leaders will facilitate rapprochement between the Parties.

  • October 31, 1956

    Notes of a Telephone Message from F. N. Gryaznov, a Counselor at the Soviet Embassy in Yugoslavia

    Tito, currently in Brioni, requests that a meeting with Khrushchev and Malenkov is relocated to Brioni, as Tito is forbidden to leave due to illness.

  • November 08, 1956

    Letter of the CC UCY to the CC CPSU with an exposition of the views of the leadership of the UCY on the events in Hungary

    In this letter, the Central Committee of Yugoslavia responds to the CC CPSU over questions concerning Yugoslavia’s decision to provide shelter to Nagy and his group at their embassy. The letter begins by expressing agreement on the weakness of Nagy’s government, the need to form a new government under Kadar, and the existence of “honest communists” in Nagy’s government that could assist Kadar. The letter relates that Yugoslavia cannot hand Nagy and his group over to authorities because of the domestic consequences of such an action. The correspondence ends with both the suggestion of amnesty for Nagy and Yugoslavia’s disavowal of any connection to Nagy or the uprising.

  • July 17, 1961

    Memorandum of Conversation between Jozip Broz Tito and George F. Kennan

    Kennan reports on a conversation with Tito where they discussed the upcoming Belgrade Conference of Non-Aligned States.

  • October 26, 1962

    Letter from Yugoslav President Tito to Brazilian President Goulart

    Yugoslav President Tito is writing to Brazilian President Goulart discussing concerns over the situation in Cuba. In Tito's opinion, the best course of action is for direct negotiations to continue in the UN.

  • December 22, 1962

    Report on Conversation with Yugoslav Leader Josef Broz Tito on Cuba, November 1962, Bucharest

    The report of Academician Ştefan S. Nicolau referring to the visit carried out to Yugoslavia by a delegation of the National High Assembly (12-22 November 1962). [Report filed 22 December 1962.] During the meeting with Josip Broz Tito, Ştefan S. Nicolau learned the opinion of the Yugoslav leader regarding the crisis of the Soviet missiles from Cuba and the war between India and China.

  • May 30, 1967

    Minutes of Conversation between Yugoslav President Josip Borz Tito and UAR Ambassador Mohamed Handy Abuzeid, in Varga

    Minutes of conversation between Tito and UAR ambassador Mohamed Handy Abuzeid, discussing the situation in the Middle East. The ambassador states the UAR's goal is peace thought a diplomatic solution at the UN. They also discuss Yugoslavia's problems with Greece and how the Yugoslavs might improve relations with Albania. Yugoslavia and the UAR express their hope to improve economic ties and maintain their good relations.

  • May 30, 1967

    Report on the talks of Josif Tito with UAR Ambassador Abuzeid in Vanga

    Tito and Ambassador Abuzeid discuss events in Egypt and the Middle East.

  • August 11, 1967

    Notes on Yugoslav-Egyption Talks

    Summaries of talks between Tito and Nasser in Cairo and Alexandria, 11-18 August 1967.

  • July 11, 1968

    Minutes of Conversation between Yugoslav President Josip Broz Tito and UAR President Gamal Abdel Nasser in Brijuni, Croatia

    Minutes of conversation between Yugoslav President Josip Broz Tito and UAR President Gamal Abdel Nasser with occasional input from advisors. Nasser describes the situation in the Middle East, including Egypt's relations with the United States and fighting along the Suez Canal. The two leaders also discuss UN Special Envoy Gunnar Jarring's recent activities. Tito closes with a recount of his visit to Japan, Mongolia, Iran, and Moscow and an update of the Yugoslav economy.

  • September 30, 1970

    Report on the Conversation Between Yugoslav President Josip Tito and US President Richard Nixon in Belgrade.

    Report on the conversation between Yugoslav president Josip Tito and U.S. president Richard Nixon in Belgrade. The exchange centers on the crisis in the Middle East and potential political scenarios in the aftermath of President Gamal Abdel Nasser's death. Nixon also raises the topic of U.S. policies in Africa and its reception among the African countries.

  • February 05, 1972

    Notes of the Discussion Between President Tito and President Sadat