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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • September 30, 1944

    Letter No. 340 from L.D. Wilgress, Canadian Embassy, Moscow, to the Secretary of State for External Affairs, W.L. Mackenzie King

  • February 03, 1949

    Memorandum of Conversation between Anastas Mikoyan and Mao Zedong

    Anastas Mikoyan and Mao Zedong converse about the mediation talks between the CCP and the Guomindang, Yugoslavia, coordination between the communist parties of the Asian countries, and the history of the CCP.

  • June 15, 1954

    Asian Peoples' Anti-Communist Conference, Minutes of the Opening Session

    Delegates from South Korea, China, Macao, the Philippines, and the Ryukyu Islands discuss the anti-communist struggle in the Asia Pacific.

  • June 15, 1954

    Asian Peoples' Anti-Communist Conference, Provisional Summary Record of the Opening Session

    Delegates from South Korea, China, Macao, the Philippines, and the Ryukyu Islands discuss the anti-communist struggle in the Asia Pacific.

  • June 16, 1954

    Asian Poeples' Anti-Communist Conference, 'We Have Communism on the Run in the Philippines'

    Jose M. Hernandez announces to the Asian Peoples' Anti-Communist Conference that "communism is on the run in the Philippines."

  • June 17, 1954

    Asian Peoples' Anti-Communist Conference, Press Release No. 5

    Jose M. Hernandez insists that "the people of the Philippines are devotedly against Communism."

  • June 17, 1954

    Asian Peoples' Anti-Communist Conference, Provisional Summary Record of the Third Session

    Minutes of the Third Session of the Asian Peoples' Anti-Communist Conference.

  • September 04, 1954

    Chinese Foreign Ministry Intelligence Department Report on the Asian-African Conference

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry reported Indonesia’s intention to hold the Asian-African Conference, its attitude towards the Asian-African Conference, and the possible development of the Conference.

  • December 15, 1954

    Report from the Asia Section, Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'On the Asian-African Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry reported that Indonesia’s intention to hold the Asian-African Conference was to establish a neutral, third group to counter the US and the Soviet Union. It also reported the attitudes of the invited countries and the reactions of the Western countries toward the Conference. It concluded that it would be beneficial for China to participate in the Conference and to influence the political situation in the Conference.

  • December 25, 1954

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Regarding Our Attitude towards the Afro-Asian Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry informed Chinese embassies overseas that China supported the Asian-African Conference as well as the participation of the countries with whom China had no diplomatic relation, such as Japan, the Philippines, and Thailand. China also emphasized that Chiang Kai-shek was not to be invited to the Conference.

  • December 29, 1954

    Cable from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Intelligence Department, 'The Agenda of the Five Southeast Asian Countries from the Bogor Conference and the Five Countries’ Attitudes towards China’s Participation in the Afro-Asian Conference '

    The agenda of the Bogor Conference was to determine the purposes, timing, and participants of the Asian-African Conference. The five Southeast Asian countries agreed that China and Japan should participate in the Asian-African Conference, but some countries also insisted on the participation of US allies such as Thailand and the Philippines.

  • 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'List of Problems Between China and Other Asian-African Countries'

    A list of problems between China and other Asian-African countries

  • 1955

    View of the Asian-African Conference from the Bogor Conference

  • March 08, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Trade, 'Plan for Our participation in theTtrade Activities of the Asian-African Conference (Draft)'

    The Department of International Trade estimated that the Asian-African Conference would be a good occasion to strengthen economic and trade relations with the participating countries. The Department of International Trade therefore made the recommendations to befriend with these former colonies for developing strong economic and political relations.

  • March 12, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Trade, 'Scheme for Our Participation in the Trade Activities of the Asian-African Conference (Revised Draft) (Preliminary Paper)'

    The Department of International Trade estimated that the Asian-African Conference would be a good occasion to strengthen economic and trade relations with the participating countries. The Department of International Trade therefore made the recommendations to befriend with these former colonies for developing strong economic and political relations. This is the modified version of the draft plan that was issued earlier.

  • March 27, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Compilation of the Excerpts of the Telegrams Concerning the Asian-African Conference'

    The collection of telegrams covers the procedure and agenda about the Asian-African Conference, the arguments about China’s participation in the Conference, the attempts of the US and the UK to influence the Conference, and the attitudes of various countries toward the Conference.

  • April 11, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Attitudes of Various Countries towards the Asian-African Conference on the Eve of the Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry examines the attitude of several parties to the Asian-African Conference, including India, Egypt, Thailand, the Philippines, and Japan.

  • April 30, 1955

    Zhou Enlai’s Report to the CCP Central Committee and Mao Zedong Regarding the Cultural Cooperation Issue

    Zhou Enlai reports on the various attitudes of the Bandung Conference participants towards Afro-Asian cultural cooperation.

  • May 10, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Comments on the Asian-African Conference from the Participating Countries After the Conference'

    Description of the reaction to the Asian-African Conference in both participating countries and capitalist ruled countries.

  • May 27, 1955

    Summary of the Views of Afro-Asian Countries on the Taiwan Issue at the Afro-Asian Conference

    The People's Republic of China maintains that the Taiwan issue was an internal issue of China, and it was the US who created tension by invading and occupying Taiwan.