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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'List of Problems Between China and Other Asian-African Countries'

    A list of problems between China and other Asian-African countries

  • March 08, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Trade, 'Plan for Our participation in theTtrade Activities of the Asian-African Conference (Draft)'

    The Department of International Trade estimated that the Asian-African Conference would be a good occasion to strengthen economic and trade relations with the participating countries. The Department of International Trade therefore made the recommendations to befriend with these former colonies for developing strong economic and political relations.

  • March 12, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Trade, 'Scheme for Our Participation in the Trade Activities of the Asian-African Conference (Revised Draft) (Preliminary Paper)'

    The Department of International Trade estimated that the Asian-African Conference would be a good occasion to strengthen economic and trade relations with the participating countries. The Department of International Trade therefore made the recommendations to befriend with these former colonies for developing strong economic and political relations. This is the modified version of the draft plan that was issued earlier.

  • April 04, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Draft Plan for Attending the Asian-African Conference'

    The participants in the Asian-African Conference had the common interest in pursuing international peace and national economic and cultural development. China should take the advantage of this Conference to promote national independence movement and to establish stronger relations with Asian and African countries. According to this goal, the plan listed the common issues that all participants faced, the issues that existed between China and other countries, and the issues that China alone was facing. It also spelled out the relations of China and different groups of counties in the Conference, as well as the logistic issues.

  • May 10, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Comments on the Asian-African Conference from the Participating Countries After the Conference'

    Description of the reaction to the Asian-African Conference in both participating countries and capitalist ruled countries.

  • October 08, 1956

    Seventh Meeting of the Main Committee, Conference on the Statute of the International Atomic Energy Agency (Statement by South African Ambassador W.C. du Plessis)

    Statement by the South African Ambassador to the United States, W. C. du Plessis, at the Seventh Meeting of the Main Committee of the Conference on the Statute of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held at the United Nations. Du Plessis discusses several amendments intending to improve the representation of African and Middle Eastern countries in the IAEA, as well as several amendments regarding the structure of the organization and the IAEA board.

  • February 11, 1957

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Syria, 'The Situation of Ambassador Chen’s Visit to the Syrian Foreign Minister'

    The Chinese Ambassador to Syria and the Syrian Foreign Minister discuss the timing of the Second Asian-African Conference and the Arab-Israeli conflict

  • April 10, 1957

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'The Premier's Discussion with the Indonesian Ambassadors on Convening the Second Afro-Asian Conference'

    In a meeting with the Indonesian ambassador, Zhou Enlai emphasized that it was important that many countries would attend the second Asian-African conference and that China wanted the conference to bolster solidarity rather than be a place for argument.

  • November 18, 1957

    Excerpt from the Unedited Translation of Mao Zedong’s Speech at the Moscow Conference of Communist and Workers’ Parties

  • December 10, 1957

    Note about a Meeting on 29 November 1957 between Deputy Foreign Minister Pak Seong-cheol with GDR Ambassador Comrade Fischer and Comrade Behrens

    East German and North Korean officials discuss North Korea's economic and political relations with India, Indonesia, Burma, Syria, and Japan.

  • January 31, 1958

    Report of the Hungarian Ambassador in Cairo on the establishment of the United Arab Republic and the Syrian public opinion in 1958 (exceprts)

    This report by the Hungarian ambassador in Cairo states that the Syrian people are wary toward President Nasser’s creation of the United Arab Republic, fearing he will enforce a dictatorship, however the Syrian communist party is in full support of the union.

  • October 14, 1961

    Memorandum of Conversation from the Meeting between Vice Premier Chen Yi and the Albanian Ambassador to China Reis Malile

    Chen Yi and Reis Malile discuss Sino-Albanian trade and Syria's secession from the United Arab Republic.

  • March 23, 1965

    Mao Zedong, 'We Hope the Arab Countries Will Unite'

  • January 20, 1966

    National Intelligence Estimate, NIE 4-66, 'The Likelihood of Further Nuclear Proliferation'

    This estimate updated an estimate (NIE-4-2-64) published in 1964 of the nuclear proliferation problem. That estimate, like this one, overestimated the likelihood of an Indian bomb, while somewhat underestimating Israel’s program. This assessment followed the same pattern—predicting India would produce a weapon within a “few years” and also putting Israel in the “might” category, although treating it as a “serious contender” nonetheless. Also following a short discussion of the “snowball effect” (later known as “proliferation cascades” or “chains”) suggesting that the United Arab Republic (Egypt-Syria) and Pakistan were likely to take the nuclear option should India or Israel go nuclear.

  • February 16, 1967

    The Visit of the [Syrian] Ba’ath in the USSR, Political Report No. 3

    The document records the state of play in Syrian-Soviet relations prior to the Six-Day War. According to the author of the report negotiations between the Syrian Ba’ath delegation and Soviet authorities, which took place in Moscow during January 1967, were tense and uneasy because the Soviets were displeased by the provocative and aggressive Syrian policy toward Israel.

  • June 17, 1967

    Central Committee of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia, 'The Near East Situation and Our Further Procedure"

    Cover page to a long report on the outcome of the Six-Day War and Czechoslovakian relations with the United Arab Republic.

  • June 17, 1967

    Explanatory Report, Attachment to 'The Near East Situation and Our Further Procedure'

    Excerpts describing Czechoslovakian and other Eastern Bloc countries' involvement in the Six-Day War.

  • June 17, 1967

    Attachment, 'Information about Czechoslovak economic relations with the United Arab Republic and the Syrian Arab Republic'

    Czechoslovakia anticipates decreased trade with the United Arab Republic and Syrian Arab Republic as they suffer negative financial repercussions from their defeat in the Six-Day War.

  • June 17, 1967

    Attachment, 'Preliminary Findings Regarding the Reasons for the United Arab Republic's and the Arab States' Defeat

    Detailed Czechoslovak report explaining the United Arab Republic's defeat in the Six-Day War.

  • June 17, 1967

    Attachment, 'Fundamental Lessons Learned from the Aggression and Proposals for Further Steps'

    Czechoslovakian assessment of the situation in the Middle East following the Six-Day War and recommended foreign policy activities.