Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

SEARCH RESULTS

  • October 09, 1952

    Record of S. Radhakrishnan’s Meeting with the FRG President

    Radhakrishnan discusses German unification with the President of West Germany, touches on India's independent stances on foreign policy issues in China, Japan, and Korea, and speaks at length about Russia's internal policies. Radhakrishnan summarizes a previous discussion with Stalin, in detail, discussing Soviet approaches to religion (compared with Indian approaches), and Stalin's strong denial of accusations of aggression: Radhakrishnan says that he is "convinced that Stalin and Russia are gripped by sincere fears of a Western attack." Radhakrisnan concludes by expressing his hope that Germany can unify.

  • March 16, 1955

    Record of 'A Chat with K. M. Panikkar at the Quai D’Orsay'

    A representative of the German Ministry of Foreign Affairs reports on his conversation with former Indian Ambassador K.M. Panikkar. Panikkar avowed that the Indian government firmly believes that Germany will eventually reunify, while it increasingly fears that Germany will unify by means of war, which would threaten India's own future development. Panikkar suggests that Nehru may discuss this issue in his upcoming meeting with Khrushchev.

  • December 04, 1958

    Comments on the Preparation of the Steps of the Soviet Government Concerning a Change in the Status of West Berlin

    East German ambassador to Moscow, Johannes Koenig summarized information he gleaned from various Soviet Foreign Ministry officials about the process leading up to Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev’s speech of 10 November 1958 and notes of 27 November 1958, which launched the Berlin Crisis.

  • September 14, 1959

    Food Situation in Pyongyang

    The GDR Embassy to the DPRK reports on the bad food situation in the DPRK basedon conversations with Czechoslovak, Polish, Hungarian and Soviet diplomats.

  • November 02, 1960

    An Assessment by the GDR Foreign Ministry of the Report from the GDR Embassy in Pyongyang regarding the Economic Situation of the DPRK for the 1st Semester of 1960

    The GDR Foreign Ministry assess the economic failures of the DPRK, attributing the work of the (Korean Worker's) Party, including the partition of the 7-year plan and other problems in agriculture and industries, as the major cause.

  • December 13, 1960

    Excerpts from 'Nodong Sinmun,' 13 December 1960

    The report of General Ra Se-kjon describes the visit of the PRC Military Delegation to a number of factories, communes and memorials in the DPRK in October-November 1960. General Ra Se-kjon describes the success of the Korean economy: the success of post-War reconstruction; the 5-year plan; the increased productivity of certain factories; the collectivization, irrigation, and electrification of the countryside; as well as education and the eradication of illiteracy.

  • February 14, 1961

    East German Embassy in North Korea, 'Information on the State of Repatriation of Koreans Living in Japan to the DPRK'

    East German diplomats report that the repatriation of Koreans living in Japan has been suspended.

  • February 26, 1962

    Note on the Discussion between Khrushchev and Ulbricht in Moscow, 26 February 1962 (Excerpts)

  • February 27, 1962

    Note on the Discussion between Khrushchev and Ulbricht in Moscow on 27 February 1962 (Excerpts)

    Discussion of economic planning in East and West Germany.

  • October 22, 1962

    Cable from Federal Republic of Germany Embassy, Washington (Knappstein)

    An analysis of American decisions during the Cuban Missile Crisis and the economic blockade, as well as of American perceptions of Soviet intentions during that time period, by the West German Ambassador to the United States.

  • October 27, 1962

    Cable from Federal Republic of Germany Embassy, Washington (Knappstein)

    A cable from the West German Embassy in Washington, D.C. discussing the threat to American security posed by an "offensive" Soviet base in Cuba, insights provided by recent intelligence, the purpose and the impact of the American blockade of Cuba, negotiations that have taken place at the United Nations, Soviet intentions during the Cuban crisis and, finally, a comparison of Cuba to the situation in Berlin.

  • November 14, 1962

    Memorandum of Large-Group Meeting of FRG Chancellor Adenauer and US President Kennedy, Washington

    A record of the large group meeting between U.S. President Kennedy, the F.R.G. Chancellor Adenauer and others in which they discuss the results of the Cuban Missile Crisis, that the situation as a whole is still ongoing, and what needs to be done to restore security to the situation.

  • April 25, 1965

    Note by the East German Embassy in Hanoi on a Conversation with Ambassadors of the Other Socialist States in the Soviet Embassy on 2 April 1965

    During the conversation, it is said that the United States is increasing its attacks and overall involvement in the Vietnam conflict. Additionally, Soviet Ambassador Shcherbakov tells Pham Van Dong how the Chinese continue to evade giving aid to Vietnam because they fear attack from the Americans.

  • May 12, 1965

    Note by the East German Embassy in Hanoi on a Joint Conversation with the Ambassadors from other Socialist Countries in the Hungarian Embassy on 4 May 1965

    Soviet Ambassador Ilya Shcherbakov informs a meeting of Socialist Ambassadors of Soviet-Vietnamese talks in Moscow. He notes that the United States realizes it does not have the international support for Vietnam that it had expected, and that the Soviet Union will continue to support Vietnam in the struggle. He argues that there is still much anti-Soviet propaganda in Vietnam, which comes from the Chinese, and points out three positions of the Chinese that he does not understand.

  • June 03, 1965

    Note by the East German Embassy in Hanoi on a Conversation of Comrade Jarck with the Attache of the Czechoslovak Embassy, Comrade Freybort, on 2 June 1965, from 10:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., in the East German Embassy [Excerpts]

    Conversation at the East German Embassy in Hanoi, where a Comrade Freybort speaks of the difficulties involved with organizing trilateral talks between the China, Vietnam, and the USSR. It is also mentioned that China criticized Vietnam for building diplomatic relations with the USSR, which China sees as an alliance with modern revisionists.

  • August 19, 1965

    Note by the East German Envoy to Moscow, Rossmeisl, on Talks with Unnamed Soviet Vietnam Specialists

    Unnamed Soviet specialists claim that the USSR's aid to Vietnam is worth 1 million rubles per day. They also argue that because of the amount of aid, the Chinese propaganda claiming a lack of Soviet aid is losing ground among the population in North Vietnam, although the rumor still persists in the South.

  • December 11, 1965

    Note by East German Ambassador on the Current Policy of the Chinese Leadership [Excerpts]

    A note on the conversations between Ho Chi Minh and Mao Zedong in Beijing. Mao stressed the importance of Vietnamese opposition to Soviet revisionism. He also argues that a larger percentage of Chinese aid should be spread amongst the Southeast Asia region, and not simply given to Vietnam.

  • January 27, 1966

    Note on Two Conversations with the Minister Counselor of the North Vietnamese Embassy, Comrade Hoan Muoi, on 26 January 1966, in the Cuban Embassy, and on 27 January 1966, on the Occasion of a Farewell Visit to Our Embassy [Excerpts]

    Minister Counselor of the DRV Embassy Hoan Muoi expresses his belief that there will be no international conference on Vietnam until there is a reconciliation between the USSR and China. He asserts that Kruschev damaged the world Communist movement, but also that China's objections to Soviet aid to Vietnam are unjustified.

  • July 09, 1966

    Note on a Conversation with the First Secretary of the Soviet Embassy, Comrade Sverev, on 8 July 1966 from 11:00 a.m. to 12:40 p.m. at the Soviet Embassy in Hanoi

    Conversation with First Secretary of the Soviet Embassy, Sverev, describing the Vietnamese attitude toward China as becoming colder. At the same time, printing of China's anti-Soviet propaganda has become more limited and the Vietnamese appear grateful for Soviet aid. Sverev also estimates that there are over 200,000 Chinese troops stationed in North Vietnam.

  • September, 1966

    Information on the Visit of a Czechoslovak Party and Government Delegation Headed by [Czechoslovak Prime Minister] Comrade Lenart in North Vietnam, 24-28 September 1966

    Information on a Czechoslovak delegation to the DRV. The Czechoslovak delegation assess the Vietnamese situation and determine that the Vietnamese successes are overestimated while American strength and fighting potential are underestimated. The Czechoslovak and Vietnamese groups disagree on China, with the Czechoslovak delegation saying the Vietnamese are simply unable to take a stance against China because it would jeopardize the aid they are receiving.