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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • January 23, 1961

    Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the GPRA, ‘Declaration of the Algerian Delegation at the Council of the Organization for Afro-Asian Solidarity'

    A report from the GPRA's Ministry of Foreign Affairs, detailing a statement from an Algerian delegation at the Council of Organization for Afro-Asian Solidarity. The Algerian delegation first recognizes and justifies the support pledged by the Afro-Asian movement for the Algerian struggle, and places the Algerian struggle within the context of the larger Afro-Asian struggle against imperialism. The delegation then says that the Council must close a gap between solely verbal commitments (suggested to be made without accompanying action) and tangible support and action backing these commitments up.

  • March 19, 1961

    Development of Relations with Socialist Countries since March 19, 1961

    Report on meetings by the Provisional Government of the Algerian Republic (GPRA) with heads of state of socialist countries.The Soviet Union and Czechoslovakia both pledge support and provided supplies to assist the GPRA.

  • March 19, 1961

    Annex #1 to 'Development of Relations with Socialist Countries since March 19, 1961'

    Recommendation that the GPRA closely monitor China's potential admission to the United Nations. Recognizes that the USSR's efforts to get China recognized by the UN, if successful, could lead to the normalization of Chinese-French relations, and withdrawal of Chinese support for Algerian struggle; advises Algeria to quickly create a diplomatic relationship with China to make this withdrawal more difficult.

  • March 19, 1961

    Annex #2 to 'Development of Relations with Socialist Countries since March 19, 1961'

    Report describing an upcoming Algerian governmental delegation visit to Beijing - with a planned stop in Moscow - as an opportunity for Algeria to seek support from Chinese and Soviet leaders in its struggle with France. Specifically mentions, among political goals, that the delegation should ask the Chinese and Russian governments to push for the governments of East Germany and Albania to officially recognize the GPRA.

  • March 19, 1961

    Report attached to 'Development of Relations with Socialist Countries since March 19, 1961'

    Report gauging Algeria's political possibilities among Eastern Bloc countries, with the exclusion of Yugoslavia. Begins with a summary of Marxist positions on national and colonial issues, followed by a detailed history, from 1922-1961, tracing the development of communist attitudes and policies toward the question of Algerian independence. Concludes with a comprehensive analysis of the contemporary (1961) status of international relations between GPRA and several blocs of socialist countries.

  • April 20, 1961

    Notes of Meeting between Boussouf, Benaouda, and Belhocine and the Chinese Ambassador

    Minutes of a meeting, on April 20, 1961, between Algerian representatives, Boussouf, Benaouda, and Belhocine, and a Chinese ambassador. In the meeting, which was called to discuss issues regarding weapons supplies from the Chinese, both sides discuss ensuing negotiations between Algeria and France. Also mentioned is Algeria's meeting with a United States ambassador, and the United States desire for compromise between Algeria and France.

  • May 16, 1961

    Summary of Meeting between Third Secretary Hassenkhe and Head of Socialist Countries Bureau Yaker

    Summary of 27 April 1961 meeting between East German Third Secretary, Hassenkhe, and Algerian Head of Socialist Countries Bureau, Layachi Yaker. Algerian government describes Algerian socialist organizations as "counter-revolutionary." Summary references East German establishment of Red Cross delegation in Morocco as unofficial channel for providing Algeria with material assistance.

  • June 10, 1961

    Telegram from Delo Balili to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Albania

    Balili writes that the location of the upcoming conference of non-aligned countries will be a contentious issue for the participants. The UAR and India have proposed Belgrade. This location is supported by the British and Americans.

  • June 17, 1961

    Summary of Meeting between Ambassador to Arab States Kiesewetter and General Secretary Belhocine and Head of Bureau Waker

    Summary of a June 17, 1961 meeting between Algeria (represented by General Secretary Belhocine and Head of Bureau Waker) and East Germany (represented by Ambassador to Arab States, Kiesewetter). The two sides discuss the suspension of the Evian negotiations between France and Algeria, East Germany's assistance for Algerian refugees in Morocco, and GDR-Algerian governmental relations. Ambassador Kiesewetter also expresses GDR's desire to peacefully coexist with West Germany in Berlin.

  • June 18, 1961

    Appendix to 'Summary of Meeting between Ambassador to Arab States Kiesewetter and General Secretary Belhocine and Head of Bureau Waker'

    Note from Algeria's Socialist Countries Bureau describing the June 17, 1961 meeting with the GDR Ambassador to Arab Countries. Note explains that the East German government is contemplating the unilateral "de jure" recognition of Algeria's government, and recommends that Algeria does not oppose this recognition.

  • July 26, 1961

    Report on the 1st conference of the non-aligned countries of September 1st, 1961 sent by Tahmaz Beqari, the Albanian ambassador in Belgrade, to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Albania

    The conference of non-aligned countries in Belgrade was organized when Indonesia and other countries of Asia and Africa were attempting to organize a Second Bandung Conference. Tito and Nehru, trying to minimize the influence of China in the Asian and African countries, initiated a conference that they called the Conference of Non-Aligned Countries in Belgrade. The document discusses the 24 participating countries, the agenda, the proceedings, the different groups among the delegation and the two main documents that the conference adopted: the manifesto and the declaration. The manifesto, titled “The Danger from the War and the Call for Peace,” according to the Albanian ambassador, was adopted in a revisionist spirit, calling on Khrushchev and Kennedy to maintain peace. Meanwhile, the declaration criticized colonialism and imperialism. The Belgrade conference did not decide on any specific issues and did not reach any important conclusions. In Albania, a week after the conference, the journal “Zeri i Popullit” (Voice of the People) wrote an article in which it identified Tito as an agent of imperialism and stated that Yugoslavia was not an non-aligned country as it participated in the Balkan Pact.

  • September 03, 1961

    Telegram from the Albanian ambassador in Belgrade, Tahmaz Beqari, to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Albania

    The ambassador reports on the proceedings of the Belgrade conference of non-aligned countries, and about the differences and nuances of the stances of various delegations. Except India, Libya, and the United Arab Republic, all delegations were in favor of China’s participation in the United Nations. In addition, Nehru pointed out that colonialism is in agony while the Ghanaian, Cuban, Iraqi, Nepalese and Ethiopian delegations claimed to the contrary. When Dorticós, the Cuban President, began unmasking American imperialism, the diplomats of Western countries left the conference. The diplomats of friendly countries, according to Beqari, called the speeches of the conference “80% positive.”

  • October 14, 1961

    Memorandum of Conversation from the Meeting between Vice Premier Chen Yi and the Albanian Ambassador to China Reis Malile

    Chen Yi and Reis Malile discuss Sino-Albanian trade and Syria's secession from the United Arab Republic.