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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • 1962

    Address by V. V. Volsky on Trends in the Economic Development of Latin America

    Address at a Soviet conference on "The Problems of the National Liberation Movement in Latin America" circa 1962. Volsky discusses the problems of the Latin American economy

  • January 01, 1962

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in India, 'Overview of India’s Foreign Relations in 1961'

    The Chinese Embassy in India reported on Indian foreign relations for the year 1961. In the report, the following issues are mentioned: Indian dependence on the United States, capitalism, opposition to China and communism, imperialism, and Indian-Pakisti relations.

  • January 02, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 2 January 1962

    There is an opinion among a small group of the heads of Latin American diplomatic posts that the US would push through the sanctions against Cuba, except for the military ones, as far as possible.

  • January 09, 1962

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Beck), Report on Deputy Foreign Minister Péter Mód’s talks with political leaders in Cuba

    Ambassador János Beck reports on Foreign Minister Péter Mód’s visit to Cuba, and with whom he met. The report is divided among four different official meetings: Foreign Minister Raul Roa, Prime Minister Fidel Castro, Carlos Rafael Rodriguez, and the Integrated Revolutionary Organizations (ORI). Beck summarizes each meeting separately. Topics include Cuba’s expectation of a US invasion and the US’s current clandestine activities, Organization of American States (OAS) and its use as a political tool in US-Latin American relations, Sino-Soviet relations, socialist unity and the importance of Soviet trade, Cuba’s perceived Soviet military advantage over the US, and the Communist Party’s development/popularity in Cuba. Many of these topics appear in various meetings outlined in the report.

  • January 15, 1962

    Memorandum from Mexican Federal Director of Security re Democratic Revolutionary Front (Cuban)

    A memorandum informing that the Cuban Democratic Revolutionary Front will be disbanding due to insufficient economic means. The Front, however, affirmed that it would continue to meet periodically to maintain a nucleus of resistance against Castro’s tyranny.

  • January 17, 1962

    Polish Embassy, Rio de Janeiro (Chabasinski), to Polish Foreign Ministry

    Telegram describing conversation between Ambassador Chabasinski and US Ambassador Gordan regarding the United States' relations with Cuba.

  • January 17, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 17 January 1962

    Jelen reports to Krajewski on the Punta del Este, based on conversations with Blas Roca [Caldeiro], [Raul] Roa [Garcia], and [Carlos] Lechuga, about the situation in various Latin American countries: Mexico, Bolivia, Columbia, Argentina, Peru, Brazil, Cuba.

  • January 31, 1962

    Research Memorandum REU-25 from Roger Hilsman to Mr. Kohler, 'European Attitudes on Independent Nuclear Capability'

    Concerns about the credibility of US nuclear deterrence generated Supreme Allied Commander Europe (SACEUR) General Lauris Norstad’s proposal for a NATO-controlled medium-range ballistic missile (MRBM) force. This lengthy report represented INR’s assessment of “present and future European interest in national or multinational nuclear weapons capabilities,” including the MRBM proposal, and the extent to which an “enhancement of NATO's nuclear role” could “deter national or multinational European nuclear weapons programs.”

  • February 21, 1962

    Research Memorandum RSB-58 from Roger Hilsman to the Secretary, 'Probable Soviet Reaction to Establishment of Multilateral NATO-Controlled MRBM Force'

    As discussion of a NATO multilateral force (MLF) unfolded, unfolded, one question which had to be addressed was how the Soviet Union would respond to the creation of such a NATO force. Because a NATO force would increase Western military capabilities, Soviet opposition was assumed.

  • February 21, 1962

    Report to the Soviet Minister of Defense and Minister of Foreign Affairs

    Message reporting the American plan to overthrow the Castro government.

  • March 01, 1962

    Assistant Secretary of State for European Affairs Foy Kohler, 'Secretary McNamara’s Views on Nuclear Sharing'

    Secretary of Defense McNamara and his Deputy Gilpatric discuss whether assisting the French with missile technology would advance their nuclear weapons program. They speculate that it will help indirectly, missile aid would reduce the cost of the French missile research program and those saving could be directed to warhead production.

  • March 09, 1962

    Memorandum of Telephone Message from Foy D. Kohler to Paul H. Nitze and Roswell L. Gilpatric

    Instructions for Roswell Gilpatric and Paul Nitze from Secretary of State Rusk for negotiations with the French. Among the topics which the US representatives should not discuss are missile sharing and a common Western nuclear force.

  • March 12, 1962

    Alexei Adzhubei's Account of His Visit to Washington to the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

    Alexei Adzhubei, Khrushchev’s son-in-law and the editor-in-chief of Izvestia, reports on his meetings with US journalists and officials in Washington, DC. Especially significant was his 30 January meeting with President John F. Kennedy in which Kennedy compared the communist revolution in Cuba with the 1956 Hungarian Revolution suppressed by the Soviet Union. Adzhubei also described Kennedy's comments on German reunification.

  • March 16, 1962

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Beck), Report on the Federal Republic of Germany and Cuba

    Ambassador János Beck reports on diplomatic relations between the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) and Cuba. Beck speculates that FRG does intelligence work for departed Americans. Central to Beck’s report is the fact that Cuba wants to preserve diplomatic relations with as many countries as possible. Relevant is the Hallstein principle and the presence of FRG diplomats and German Democratic Republic’s Political Commission. (There are two self-governing and independent German states in Cuba.)

  • March 17, 1962

    Intelligence Report on US Plan to Attack Cuba

    Intelligence report on possible US plans to invade Cuba. Forces will invade from Guatemala and Panama, "with support of the armed forces of the USA from their naval base in Guantanamo." The report also mentioned Havana's knowledge of the plan.

  • April 02, 1962

    Message from the Italian Communist Party to the Cuban Leadership

    The Italian Communist Party sends a message to the Cuban government expressing their hope that the Organization of American States (OAS) will begin to see the Cuban perspective and that "the decisions of the OAS cannot suspend the Cuban truth from the American continent."

  • April 05, 1962

    Reprise of Radio Free Europe and the Hungarian Revolution

    Cord Meyer reviews the history for DCI John A. McCone

  • April 25, 1962

    Rajya Sabha Q&A on the Export of Nuclear Weapons and Proliferation

    Transcript of questions and answers between members of the Rajya Sabha and the Minister of State in the Ministry of External Affairs, Shrimati Lakshmi Menon, on the Indian government's opposition to United States export of nuclear weapons.

  • May 29, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Foreign Ministry to Polish Embassy, Washington, 29 May 1962

    Ogrodinski tells Drozniak to meet with officials who deal with Latin American relations and take them to an informal lunch. He tells him the conversation should be of an unofficial nature and it should be aimed at getting to know the officials' views on the current attitude and intentions of the US towards Cuba.

  • May 31, 1962

    Summary of Ambassador Wang Binnan’s Report to the Department Party Committee

    Wang Bingnan reports extensively on social, political, religious, and economic conditions within Poland, as well as Poland's foreign relalations with the US, the Soviet Union, and China.