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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • 1962

    Address by V. V. Volsky on Trends in the Economic Development of Latin America

    Address at a Soviet conference on "The Problems of the National Liberation Movement in Latin America" circa 1962. Volsky discusses the problems of the Latin American economy

  • January 02, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 2 January 1962

    There is an opinion among a small group of the heads of Latin American diplomatic posts that the US would push through the sanctions against Cuba, except for the military ones, as far as possible.

  • January 09, 1962

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Beck), Report on Deputy Foreign Minister Péter Mód’s talks with political leaders in Cuba

    Ambassador János Beck reports on Foreign Minister Péter Mód’s visit to Cuba, and with whom he met. The report is divided among four different official meetings: Foreign Minister Raul Roa, Prime Minister Fidel Castro, Carlos Rafael Rodriguez, and the Integrated Revolutionary Organizations (ORI). Beck summarizes each meeting separately. Topics include Cuba’s expectation of a US invasion and the US’s current clandestine activities, Organization of American States (OAS) and its use as a political tool in US-Latin American relations, Sino-Soviet relations, socialist unity and the importance of Soviet trade, Cuba’s perceived Soviet military advantage over the US, and the Communist Party’s development/popularity in Cuba. Many of these topics appear in various meetings outlined in the report.

  • January 15, 1962

    Memorandum from Mexican Federal Director of Security re Democratic Revolutionary Front (Cuban)

    A memorandum informing that the Cuban Democratic Revolutionary Front will be disbanding due to insufficient economic means. The Front, however, affirmed that it would continue to meet periodically to maintain a nucleus of resistance against Castro’s tyranny.

  • January 17, 1962

    Polish Embassy, Rio de Janeiro (Chabasinski), to Polish Foreign Ministry

    Telegram describing conversation between Ambassador Chabasinski and US Ambassador Gordan regarding the United States' relations with Cuba.

  • January 17, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 17 January 1962

    Jelen reports to Krajewski on the Punta del Este, based on conversations with Blas Roca [Caldeiro], [Raul] Roa [Garcia], and [Carlos] Lechuga, about the situation in various Latin American countries: Mexico, Bolivia, Columbia, Argentina, Peru, Brazil, Cuba.

  • January 18, 1962

    Report from Cultural Attaché at the Israeli Embassy, Rio de Janeiro, Smeul Benizi, 18 January 1962, Subject: 'Brazil – Cuban-Latin American Relations'

    Cultural Attaché at the Israeli Embassy in Rio de Janeiro, Smeul Benizi, discusses the proposal from Brazil to the Organization of American States (OAS) suggesting that Cuba become a neutral country, like Finland.

  • January 25, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 25 January 1962

    Jelen reports that the information he is getting from the Punta [del Este] is fragmentary. He also reports that Fidel decisively rejected the concept of “Finlandization” of Cuba.

  • January 31, 1962

    Socialist Unity Party of Germany Central Committee (SED CC) Department of International Relations, 'Position on the publications about the Meeting of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Cuba [CPC]'

    On 29 and 30 January 1968 the central organ of the Cuban CP, “Granma,” published the speech given by Comrade Raoul [Raúl] Castro, second secretary of the CC of the CPC, at the 3rd meeting of the CC (24-26 January 1968). In this speech, comrades from the CPSU, the SED, and the CPCz were directly attacked in connection with the measures of the CC against a “micro faction” and openly accused of conspiracy against the Cuban party leadership and of collaboration with the penalized Cuban comrades.

  • February 03, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 3 February 1962

    Jelen discusses the eighth meeting of consultation of foreign ministers of the Organization of American States at Punta del Este and their decision to exclude the current government of Cuba from the inter-American system.

  • February 05, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 5 February 1962

    Jelen continues his reporting on the eighth meeting of consultation of foreign ministers in Punta del Este by discussing diplomatic relations between Central and South American countries and their opinions on the American sanctions against Cuba.

  • February 21, 1962

    Report to the Soviet Minister of Defense and Minister of Foreign Affairs

    Message reporting the American plan to overthrow the Castro government.

  • March 12, 1962

    Alexei Adzhubei's Account of His Visit to Washington to the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

    Alexei Adzhubei, Khrushchev’s son-in-law and the editor-in-chief of Izvestia, reports on his meetings with US journalists and officials in Washington, DC. Especially significant was his 30 January meeting with President John F. Kennedy in which Kennedy compared the communist revolution in Cuba with the 1956 Hungarian Revolution suppressed by the Soviet Union. Adzhubei also described Kennedy's comments on German reunification.

  • March 15, 1962

    Report on US Policy toward Cuba

    Report on the US attempts to isolate Cuba from other countries in the Western Hemisphere and their intention to use counter-revolutionary forces and the uneasy economic situation in Cuba to incite an internal uprising against the Castro government

  • March 16, 1962

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Beck), Report on the Federal Republic of Germany and Cuba

    Ambassador János Beck reports on diplomatic relations between the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) and Cuba. Beck speculates that FRG does intelligence work for departed Americans. Central to Beck’s report is the fact that Cuba wants to preserve diplomatic relations with as many countries as possible. Relevant is the Hallstein principle and the presence of FRG diplomats and German Democratic Republic’s Political Commission. (There are two self-governing and independent German states in Cuba.)

  • March 17, 1962

    Intelligence Report on US Plan to Attack Cuba

    Intelligence report on possible US plans to invade Cuba. Forces will invade from Guatemala and Panama, "with support of the armed forces of the USA from their naval base in Guantanamo." The report also mentioned Havana's knowledge of the plan.

  • March 19, 1962

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Beck), Report on meeting with Yugoslav Ambassador Boško Vidaković

    János Beck reports on his conversation with Yugoslav ambassador to Havana, Boško Vidaković. Vidaković notes an increased interest in Yugoslav socialism among Castro supporters. Previously Cuban officials rebuffed Vidaković. Vidaković believes the change is prompted by Cuba’s difficult economic and political situation, in which the latter includes organizational and leadership strife.

  • March 23, 1962

    Letter to Comrade Brisuela

    Letter written to Comrade Carlos C. Brisuela, a representative of the Cuban government. Two annexes are attached. These state that the USSR will provide to Cuba (in addition to the materials provided by the 30 Sept. 1961 agreement) the materials as specified in Annex I. Apart from the provision provided by Annex I, the USSR will provide materials in accordance with Annex II. In all other affairs, the parties are guided by the original Sept. 1961 agreement.

  • March 24, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 24 March 1962

    Jelen relays information presented by Blas Roca and Emilio Aragones Navarro on the ORI's decision to exclude Anibal Escalante from the leadership of the ORI.

  • April 02, 1962

    Message from the Italian Communist Party to the Cuban Leadership

    The Italian Communist Party sends a message to the Cuban government expressing their hope that the Organization of American States (OAS) will begin to see the Cuban perspective and that "the decisions of the OAS cannot suspend the Cuban truth from the American continent."