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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • January, 1964

    Information of the Bulgarian Embassy in Havana Regarding the Situation in Cuba in 1963

    The Bulgarian Embassy in Havana reports to the Central Committee of the Bulgarian Communist Party and the Bulgarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs on political, economic, and cultural developments in Cuba circa 1963. Cuba is politically united, but is experiencing economic hardship after the “Caribbean Crisis” primarily because of the US embargo. In the report, embassy staff reviews developments between socialist countries and Cuba throughout 1963. Some examples include communist aid to Cuba after Hurricane Flora and Cuba’s stance on Sino-Soviet relations. Bulgaria’s show of solidarity resulted in concrete political, economic, and cultural cooperation. Embassy staff notes the drawbacks and benefits of Bulgaria’s relationship with Cuba.

  • 1964

    Material for the Visit of Prestes with Ulbricht on 14 February 1964

    A dossier of materials on the Brazilian Communist Party prepared in anticipation of a visit by Luis Carlos Prestes. It gives an overview of East German relations with the Brazilian Communist Party as well as current domestic politics in Brazil.

  • March 04, 1964

    S. A. Levin, L.R. Powers, and E. Von Halle, Union Carbide Corporation Nuclear Division, 'Nth Power Evaluation'

    Union Carbide Nuclear Company updates their previous study on the ease with which other nations could secretly create nuclear weapon facilities using the gas centrifuge.

  • March 28, 1964

    Airgram from the Embassy of the US in Rio De Janeiro to the Department of State, 'Non-Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy by Brazil'

    The US Embassy in Rio De Janeiro sends airgram to the Department of State regarding military pressure in Brazil to produce fissionable material for nonpeaceful purposes.

  • May 18, 1964

    Czechoslovak Embassy in La Paz to Central Committee of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia

    When Bolivia’s political crises reached fever pitch in the lead up to the May 1964 presidential elections, the Communist Party turned to Prague for financial support. Back in Prague, Foreign Ministry officials responded in bold handwriting with a short phrase: nepřichází v úvahu, which translates roughly as "no way."

  • June 04, 1964

    Letter from Christopher Audland, British Embassy in Buenos Aires, to Alan Goodison, Eastern Department of the Foreign Office

    Christopher Audland, a political officer at the British Embassy in Buenos Aires, learned from the Canadian Charge d'Affaires that the information on the Argentine-Israel uranium deal "did not originate in Buenos Aires," and that the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission had made previous uranium sales to West Germany and to Israel in 1962. Minutes are attached.

  • June 11, 1964

    Letter from Peter Ramsbotham, British Embassy in Paris, to William 'Willie' Morris, Foreign Office

    This letter describes a meeting between Peter Ramsbotham, chief of the chancery at the British Embassy in France, and George Soutou, a senior official at the French Foreign Ministry. Soutou acknowledged that the French believed that the Israelis were attempting to "put themselves in a position to make a nuclear bomb if they wanted to." The French-Israeli agreement did not include a condition that prevented the use of non-French uranium for Dimona, and Ramsbotham wondered whether the French should be told about the Argentine-Israeli secret deal. Minutes of a conversation with Arkell of the Defense Intelligence Staff are attached.

  • June 22, 1964

    Letter from Alan C. Goodison, Eastern Department of the Foreign Office, to C. J. Audland, British Embassy in Buenos Aires

    Noting some inaccuracy in the Canadian Defence Research Board report---Argentina could not have offered to sell its “entire production” of uranium if it was also selling concentrate to Germany and trying to sell it to Japan—Goodison, of the Foreign Office's Eastern Department, asked Audland, a political officer at the British Embassy in Buenos Aires, to “keep your ears to the ground” to find the “exact quantities” involved.

  • July 01, 1964

    Letter from D. Arkell, Defense Intelligence Staff, to R. J. T. McLaren, Eastern Department of the Foreign Office

    According to D. Arkell of the Defence Intelligence Staff, Canadian intelligence was now doubtful about the reliability of their reports on the Argentine-Israeli uranium sale.

  • July 15, 1964

    Airgram CA-528 from the Department of State to US Embassies in Israel and Argentina, 'Israeli Purchase of Argentine Uranium'

    This joint State Department and CIA message reported an unconfirmed intelligence of an Argentine-Israeli agreement on 3 November 1963, and requested information on the specifics of the deal by 1 September 1964.

  • July 15, 1964

    Proposal to the Presidium of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia, 'Help to the People’s Progressive Party of British Guiana'

    Proposal and resolution for Czechoslovak assistance to the People's Progressive Party of British Guiana.

  • August 21, 1964

    Letter from Alan C. Goodison, Eastern Department of the Foreign Office, to C. J. Audland, British Embassy in Buenos Aires

    Alan Goodison reported that U.S. officials were skeptical of the Canadian report because their sources had no information about an Argentine-Israeli deal and Argentine exports to Israel had not been reported in the Official Bulletin.

  • August 26, 1964

    Letter from R. C. Treweeks, Defense Intelligence Staff, to Alan C. Goodison, Eastern Department of the Foreign Office

    Referring to Goodison and Kellas' correspondence, Treweeks states that evidence shows that the Canadian report concerning an Argentine-Israeli uranium deal was incorrect and that there is little evidence for an Israeli plutonium separation facility.

  • September 02, 1964

    Airgram from the US Embassy in Argentina to the Department of State, 'Israeli Purchase of Argentine Uranium'

    The interim report from the US Embassy in Buenos Aires, filed just past the 1 September deadline, confirms the sale of 100 tons of yellow cake uranium to Israel over the course of a three-year period, beginning 1 January 1963. The uranium was to be used solely for the peaceful use of nuclear energy.

  • October 06, 1964

    Letter from D. Arkell, Defense Intelligence Staff, to Alan C. Goodison, Eastern Department of the Foreign Office

    In this letter, which summarizes and agrees with the US assessment of the Argentine-Israeli deal, Arkell asks for Goodison's opinion and whether he knows of any safeguards arrangements between Israel and Argentina.

  • October 09, 1964

    Airgram CA-3992 from the Department of State to the US Embassy in Argentina, 'Israeli Purchase of Argentine Uranium'

    Responding to the report from the US Embassy in Argentina, the State Department asked it to obtain as much information as possible on the end-use of uranium sold to Israel, and in particular on the issue of safeguards.

  • October 19, 1964

    Cable 555 from the US Embassy in Argentina to the Department of State

    Meeting with embassy officials, the chief of the National Atomic Energy Commission Admiral Oscar A. Quihillalt informed them that Argentine uranium sales agreements had only general safeguard provisions stipulating that the uranium would be used peacefully, and did not require reports, inspections, or any other independent verification that were loosely equivalent to Article XIII of the IAEA statute.

  • October 23, 1964

    Cable 578 from the US Embassy in Argentina to the Department of State

    In a meeting with Foreign Office officials, a US embassy officer stated that the US did not object to the sale of uranium to Israel, but sought cooperation in order to assure that appropriate safeguards were put into place.

  • October 27, 1964

    Cable 591 from the US Embassy in Argentina to the Department of State

    When embassy officers provided the aide-memoir and the paper on IAEA safeguards to Admiral Quihillalt, the chief of the National Atomic Energy Commission, he was more receptive to the US position than previously and was glad to know that the US was not in touch with the Israelis about the sale.

  • November 25, 1964

    Cable 549 from the Department of State to the US Embassies in Argentina, Austria, and Israel

    This cable from the US Department of State expresses concern that the Foreign Office was slow to respond to questions about the Argentine-Israeli deal, particularly with regards to safeguards, and says that the Dept. of State, ACDA, and the AEC were considering more "representations" to Argentina and possibly to Israel.