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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • January 10, 1981

    Pre-implementation Meeting, Mr. Ahtisaari Answers to Questions, Version 1

    Answers to several questions, including the matters of returning refugees, demilitarization, and fair elections in Namibia.

  • January 10, 1981

    Pre-implementation Meeting, Mr. Ahtisaari Answers to Questions, Version 2

    Record of a pre-implementation meeting in Geneva between delegations from SWAPO and the South African administration of Namibia. SWAPO emphasizes its readiness to set dates for a cease fire and for arrival of the United Nations Transition Assistance Group (UNTAG). The South African delegation argues that, by recognizing only SWAPO, and not other parties in Namibia, the UN had proven itself impartial and refused to set definite dates.

  • January 19, 1981

    UN Security Council Report Concerning the Implementations of Resolutions 435 (1978) and 439 (1978) Concerning the Question of Namibia

    Report by the UN Secretary-General on the Geneva meeting between SWAPO and South African delegations. Notes that the meeting did not achieve its goals of designating a date for a cease-fire or for the implementation of the United Nations Transition Assistance Group (UNTAG). Points out that the meeting did succeed in informing parties of the UN's plans for implementation and as a demonstration of good faith.

  • March, 1981

    South African Department of Foreign Affairs, 'Directive for Discussions of Nuclear Matters with United States Authorities'

    A memorandum in advance of a meeting between U.S. and South African policymakers which outlines South Africa’s intention to adhere to the principles and spirit of the NPT, and concerns about the supply of fuel for the Koeberg and SAFARI-1 reactors

  • March 04, 1981

    Telegram from South African Ambassador in Washington Donald Sole on Prospective Reagan Administration Non-Proliferation Policy

    South African Ambassador Donald Sole reports on the possible effect of Reagan non-proliferation policy on South African/US nuclear relations.

  • March 20, 1981

    Report, South African Department of Foreign Affairs, 'South African-United States' Nuclear Relations'

    Background on US-South African nuclear relations and uranium cooperation from the end of the Second World War to the early 1980s. Also addressed is the Vela incident of September 1979 and the international community’s backlash against the South African government.

  • March 22, 1981

    Letter from Yonah Efrat to Margot and Magnus Malan, South African Minister of Defence

    Israeli General Yonah Efrat replies with a short note to Margot and Magnus Malan's personal letter.

  • April 09, 1981

    Special Assistant for NPI, NFAC, CIA, to Resource Management Staff, Office of Program Assessment et al, 'Request for Review of Draft Paper on the Security Dimension of Non-Proliferation'

    Just a few months into President Reagan’s first term his administration wanted to make its own mark on nonproliferation policy. The report suggests building “broader bilateral relationship[s]” and offering political and security incentives could persuade states considering developing nuclear weapons to cease these efforts.

  • April 15, 1981

    Memorandum of Conversation Between R. F. Botha and Chester Crocker of the US Department of State

    Leaked memorandum of conversation between "Pik" Botha and Chester Crocker. Botha questions how much South Africa can trust the United States to support the former in Namibia negotiations. He also raises concerns about the effects that a SWAPO victory in Namibia could have. Crocker reassures him on both subjects, based on the strength and resistance to pressure of the Reagan administration.

  • May, 1981

    Announcement, F. W. de Klerk, South African Minister of Mineral and Energy Affairs, 'Safari-1 to be Operated by Locally Manufactured Fuel'

    Statement by Minister of Mineral and Energy Affairs F.W. De Klerk announcing plans to supply the SAFARI-1 reactor with locally-sourced uranium, yet will continue to adhere to IAEA safeguards for both the reactor and the fuel.

  • May 08, 1981

    Telegram from South African Ministry of Foreign Affairs on Announcement by F.W. de Klerk, Minister of Mineral and Energy Affairs, that SAFARI I Reactor

    South African Ministry of Foreign Affairs informs its missions in Washington, Paris, London, Bonn about an announcement by F.W. De Klerk, Minister of Mineral and Energy Affairs, that under terms agree with the United States and the IAEA, SAFARI I will be operated on locally manufactured fuel.

  • May 15, 1981

    Notes on Meeting between South African Minister of Foreign Affairs R. F. Botha and US President Reagan

    South African Minister of Foreign Affairs "Pik" Botha and President Reagan meet in Washington, DC. South African Ambassador Sole, the note taker, interprets Reagan's friendly opening comments as "the inference clearly being that he had no illusions about democratic rule in Africa." They discuss the situation in Namibia and Angola, and their shared opposition to Soviet and communist influence in the region. Botha also asks Reagan to help South Africa's souring relations with France regarding nuclear cooperation. Botha states that "South Africa was not preparing or intending to explode a nuclear device, but[...] could not afford publicly to surrender this option."

  • May 19, 1981

    Letter from South African Minister of Foreign Affairs R.F. Botha to US Secretary of State A.M. Haig Jr.

    Letter from R. F. "Pik" Botha to Alexander Haig, noting that the United States and South Africa have parallel goals in Namibia: the establishment of an independent state without a Marxist-socialist government. Lays out a list of qualities that the South African government wants to see in the new Namibian state.

  • June, 1981

    Secretary's Talking Points: US-China Relations

    This is a document containing talking points for Secretary of State Alexander Haig's meeting with Deng Xiaoping. Topics addressed in the document include: Chinese exportation of uranium and heavy water to South Africa and Argentina; the intention to suspend the prohibition of arm sales to China; greater nuclear and security cooperation; the increase in Chinese arm sales to countries dependent on the Soviet Union; and the desire to open a new consulate in Shenyang.

  • June 10, 1981

    Letter from Israeli General Rafael Eitan to South African Minister Magnus Malan on Israeli Airstrike on Iraqi Nuclear Reactor

    Chief of Staff of Israel Defense Forces, General Rafael Eitan writes to South African Minister of Defence Magnus Malan shortly after Israel’s 1981 strike on Iraq’s Osirak nuclear reactor. In this candid letter, Eitan states that Israel’s “iron determination” would not “allow these crazy Arabs to possess nuclear weapons," adding that "anyone who tries to say that the nuclear reactor in Iraq was only for research purposes is wicked, cynical and oil, not human blood, flows in his veins."

  • June 11, 1981

    Letter from US President Reagan to South African Prime Minister P.W. Botha

    Reagan writes to South African Prime Minister R. F. "Pik" Botha regarding his meetings with the Minister of Foreign Affairs and Information, Pieter W. Botha (no relation). Reagan expresses hope that relations between the two countries will be more cooperative in the future, and states that although the Nambia issue has complicated that relationship, it "can also be an opportunity to help stem the growth of Soviet influence in the region."

  • August 18, 1981

    Letter from South African Foreign Minister R. F. Botha on Relations with the Reagan Administration

    Letter from South African Foreign Minister "Pik" Botha to South African Member of Parliament J.W.K. Wiley on relations with the United States. He notes that there has been a considerable change in policy since the Reagan administration took over from Carter, summarizing that "the Americans are not at present trying to make trouble for us," although that may change if progress is not made on South West Africa, i.e. Namibia.

  • September, 1981

    Letter from Former Israeli Central Command Head Yonah Efrat to South African Defence Minister Magnus Malan

    In an undated, handwritten personal letter, Yonah Efrat writes to South African Defence Minsiter Magnus Malan regarding the visit of South African Chief of Staff Viljoen.

  • September 30, 1981

    Letter from South African Defence Minister Magnus Malan to Former Israeli Chief of General Staff Yonah Efrat

    South African Defence Minister Magnus Malan responds to Yonah Efrat's letter, reiterating that he hopes their relationship will remain strong in the future.

  • December 07, 1981

    Letter from Israeli Defense Minister Ariel Sharon to South African Defence Minister Magnus Malan

    Israeli Defense Minister Ariel Sharon writes to South African Defence Minister Magnus Malan to thank him for his hospitality while Sharon was visiting South Africa. He extends an invitation for Malan to visit Israel and hopes he will be able to sign a Memorandum of Understanding when he next visits South African in March 1982.