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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • December 10, 1945

    Soviet Foreign Ministry Report, 'On the Question of a United Government in Korea'

    This document discusses the creation of an independent Korea. Roosevelt, Churchill, and Jiang Jieshi (Chiang Kai-shek) first presented the idea at the Cairo Conference in 1943. The United States supports the creation of a single Korean state while the USSR opposes it. The document discusses the importance of the answer to the unification question for the Soviet Union's political and economic future as well as its interest in the Far East.

  • July 11, 1948

    Record of Conversation between Kim Gu and Liu Yuwan

    Kim Gu (Kim Koo) and the Chinese Nationalist Minister Liu Yuwan discuss Kim's participation in the South Korean government, his attendance at a conference in Pyongyang, and the possibility of a Russian-led attack on southern Korea.

  • October 10, 1948

    Soviet Political, Economic, and Cultural Aid to the DPRK People for the DPRK's Democratic Construction

    The Ministry of Culture and Propaganda publishes a pamphlet on the Soviet Union's tremendous assistance to the DPRK and contrasts the Soviet Union with the behavior of the US and Japan.

  • April 07, 1950

    National Security Council Report, NSC 8/2, "Position of the United States with Respect to Korea"

    Report by the National Security Council to the President on US policy objectives regarding Korea.

  • June 27, 1950

    Statement by the President, Truman on Korea

    Truman's statement on the invasion of South Korea by North Korean forces.

  • January, 1951

    Contract, Goverment of Republic of Korea and CDT Corporation

    Detailed agreement on the price of scrap collected in Korea, and arrangements for shipping.

  • January 26, 1951

    Letter, Harold Lady to Syngman Rhee

    Harold Lady writes regarding his decision to leave Japan because of issues with the State Department.

  • April 02, 1951

    Letter, Syngman Rhee to Lieutenant General John B. Coulter

    Syngman Rhee thanks Coulter for his birthday letter.

  • June 06, 1953

    Statement by President Syngman Rhee

    President Syngman Rhee strongly opposed the peace talks between the United Nations, the North Korea People’s Army, and the Chinese People’s Volunteer Army. Rhee proposed that he would accept this armistice only if the United States signed a Mutual Defense Pact and to continue to build the ROK forces after the war.

  • June 15, 1953

    Letter, John W. Staggers to Syngman Rhee

    John W. Staggeres responds to Syngman Rhee's question about his loan to "a certain Korean lady."

  • July 03, 1953

    Telegram of the Soviet Chargé to the PRC to the Chairman of the USSR Council of Ministers

    After acknowledging Syngman Rhee's solitary role in blocking the passage of the armistice agreement, Peng Dehuai and Kim Il Sung draft a response to General Clark.

  • July 27, 1953

    President Eisenhower to the President of the Republic of Korea (Rhee)

    Eisenhower informs Rhee that US Secretary of State John Foster Dulles will be visiting Korea shortly.

  • July 27, 1953

    Notes on Visit of General Clark with President Rhee (8:30-8:55, 27 July 1953)

    General Clark tries to convince President Rhee to attend the armistice signing, emphasizing that Kim Il Sung will not be present. Ambassador Briggs then reports that President Eisenhower has approved $200 million in aid for Korean rehabilitation.

  • August 03, 1953

    Confidential Memorandum, Before Agreeing to the Armistice Agreement

    When the United States agreed to a truce talk to end the Korea War, President Syngman Rhee disapproved. He opposed the truce and tried to attack these peace proceedings through a serious of events- such as releasing thousands of prisoners of war and creating turmoil for the US government. In order to persuade Rhee to accept the armistice defense, the US dispatches Assistant Secretary of State Walter Robertson to meet with the South Korean president in a series of bargaining discussions. Eventually, under certain conditions and a mutual defense pact with the US, Rhee agrees to the armistice.

  • August 06, 1953

    Proposed Joint Statement by President Rhee and Secretary Dulles

    In this proposed joint statement, President Rhee and Secretary Dulles discuss the terms for the joint security pact between the ROK and the US.

  • August 14, 1953

    Memorandum, President Syngman Rhee to All Diplomatic Officials

    Following the ratification of the Armistice Agreement and the Mutual Defense Treaty, President Rhee conveys that he expects the Armistice to fail because the communists will “undoubtedly” violate it and undermine Korean independence. Rhee wants to renew war to secure victory but most importantly to strengthen the ROK-U.S alliance. Following the memorandum he makes twelve points ranging from topic like Korean rehabilitation to prisoners of war from the Korean War.

  • September 24, 1953

    Letter, Syngman Rhee to John W. Staggers

    Syngman Rhee invites Staggers and his wife to visit Korea and asks about Harold Lady's clearance with the State Department.

  • October 02, 1953

    Associated Press Report, Syngman Rhee Statement on Chinese Occupying North Korea

    President Syngman Rhee states he is ready to "repoen the war against Chinese reds occupying North Korea" and if necessary, he will go ahead without American support.

  • October 06, 1953

    Letter, John W. Staggers to Syngman Rhee

    Staggers accepts Syngman Rhee's invitation to visit Korea and reports on Harold Lady's meetings with the State Department.

  • 1954

    Memorandum, Korean Consulate General to President Eisenhower

    The Korean Consulate General passes along information from a Chinese source that Syngman Rhee is interested in forming a Korean Reconstruction Finance Corporation.