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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • January 01, 1956

    Twenty-First Session of the United Nations General Assembly, 'Agenda Items Relating to Disarmament'

    Summary of the Twenty-First Session of the United Nations General Assembly's agenda on disarmament

  • March 22, 1957

    Memorandum from the Soviet Government to the Chinese Government on the Arms Reduction Issue

    A memorandum from the Soviet government to the Chinese updating them on the arms reduction talks, a key component of which was a prohibition of the testing of atomic and hydrogen weapons. The Soviet proposal also called for reductions in conventional weapons and the prohibition of installing nuclear weapons outside their territorial borders.

  • December 10, 1957

    Letter, Nikolai Bulganin to Dwight D. Eisenhower

    Bulganin proposes a halt on nuclear tests among the United States, the Soviet Union, and the United Kingdom beginning on January 1, 1958.

  • December 15, 1957

    Announcement from the Chinese Government Supporting the Soviet Union's Suggestion for Peace

    The Chinese Government endorses a proposal by the Soviet Union for the USSR, the US, and the UK to halt nuclear weapons tests.

  • January 12, 1958

    Letter, Dwight D. Eisenhower to Nikolai Bulganin

  • January 21, 1958

    Abstract of Conversation: Vice-Minister Zhang Receives Indian Ambassador Nehru

    Responding to concerns about Great Britain expressed earlier by Premier Zhou in an earlier conversation, Ambassador Nehru reports that UK Prime Minister Macmillan believes that any major powers conference on disarmament should be organized by the US and USSR. Ambassador Nehru emphasized the necessity of Chinese involvement to PM Macmillan.

  • March 28, 1958

    Conversation of Mao Zedong with Soviet Ambassador Pavel Yudin (Excerpt)

    In a conversation with Soviet ambassador Yudin, Mao sees a prohibition of the use of hydrogen weapons as very likely, as the capitalist countries "[fear] fighting this kind of war." Further, he notes that the socialist countries have an advantage over Western ones in terms of conventional army size.

  • October 28, 1958

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union, 'Gromyko Discussed the Issue of Stopping Nuclear Weapons Tests'

    Gromyko informs Liu Xiao of the Soviet position and strategy in its negotiations with the United States and the United Kingdom for halting nuclear tests.

  • October 14, 1959

    From the Journal of Ambassador S.F. Antonov, Summary of a Conversation with the Chairman of the CC CPC Mao Zedong

    October 1959 conversation between Mao Zedong and the Soviet diplomat and sinologist S.F. Antonov, in which Mao attempted to reassure the Soviets that China would not provoke war with the United States or with its Asian neighbors. In his conversation with Antonov, Mao attempts to lessen the impact of China’s displeasure with Soviet policies. He tries hard to show his agreement with Moscow on every issue—the United States, Taiwan, India, Tibet, disarmament.

  • March 21, 1960

    Journal of Soviet Ambassador in the DPRK A.M. Puzanov for 21 March 1960

    Pak Seong-cheol and Puzanov discuss the presidential elections in South Korea and the Ten Nation Committee on Disarmament.

  • June 04, 1960

    Journal of Soviet Ambassador in the DPRK A.M. Puzanov for 4 June 1960

    Puzanov urgently delivers a CPSU Central Committee letter to Kim Chang-man and informs Kim about Khrushchev's statement on general and complete disarmament.

  • October 14, 1960

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Response on Our Attitude toward Khrushchev's Remarks at the 15th UNGA'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry offers instructions for how embassies should respond to Nikita Khrushchev's speech at the 15th United Nations General Assembly.

  • June 05, 1961

    Telegram from Nesti Nase, the Albanian ambassador to the USSR, to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Albania

    Nase writes that the Soviet government carefully attempts to give the conference of non-aligned countries an anti-imperialist and anti-colonialist character. The Soviet position on these issues is based on the resolution prepared by Asian and African countries in the 15th session of the UN on disarmament, which in the end was not voted upon, and on the declaration on decolonization approved by the UN.

  • July 18, 1961

    Telegram of Delo Balili, the Albanian ambassador to Cairo, to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    Balili reports that the Indian ambassador to Cairo had told him that President Nehru would participate personally in the conference of non-aligned countries because the main goal of the conference was to find a formula for rapprochement between the Soviet Union and the United States, and for disarmament in general. According to the Indian ambassador, the disappearance of the issues of colonialism and racial discrimination from the conference documents are not urgent problems. In November, Nehru would meet with Khrushchev and, later with Kennedy.

  • August, 1961

    Italian Prime Minister Fanfani's Visit to Moscow, August 1961

    A series of talks between Fanfani and Khrushchev in Moscow in early August 1961. The focus of the talks is on the ongoing Berlin Crisis and "the German question." Other topics include relations between Italy and the Soviet Union, East/West tensions, and nuclear disarmament.

  • October 11, 1961

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Poland, 'Some Noteworthy Situations from the Polish Leadership’s Open Remarks on International Issues'

    The Chinese Embassy reports on Gomułka's foreign policies.

  • June 19, 1962

    Fifth Official Meeting Between the Delegation of the Albanian Labor Party and the Delegation of the Chinese Communist Party

    Albanian leaders Hysni Kapo and Ramiz Alia meet with a Chinese delegation to discuss industrialization in Communist countries, specificallyAlbania's five-year plan. The Albanians complain about being excluded from international meetings of the socialist countries. The Chinese update the Albanians on their position of supporting Jiang Jieshi over the "Two Chinas" objective of the United States and their relations with other countries throughout Asia, while encouraging the Albanians to reach out to the Muslim nations of Africa.

  • December 27, 1962

    Bulgarian UN Representative Milko Tarabanov, Report to Bulgarian Communist Party Politburo on Disarmament Negotiations

    UN Representative Milko Tarabanov reported to the Bulgarian Communist Party Politburo recent developments of the Conference of the Eighteen-Nation Committee on Disarmament. The report summarizes the conference's work from November 1962-December 1962, the period following the Cuban Missile Crisis. Tarabanov reports that Western powers put forward two draft agreements calling for the cessation of nuclear tests in the atmosphere, under water and in outer space, and underground--the proposals were debated during the 17th United Nations session. The Cubam Missile Crisis occurred during the conference's session. Main issues discussed after Cuban Missile Crisis included: suspension of nuclear tests, Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko's proposal at the 17th session of the UN, ways to measure nuclear weapons testing, and military alliances (NATO). Tarabanov also addresses the inter workings of conference members--Western, socialist, and neutral--including disagreements among Western powers. In summary Tarabanov adds that the prospect for cessation of nuclear tests is poor, but notes that the US may consider closing military bases, though not under pressure of the Soviet Union or neutral countries.

  • December 07, 1963

    Telegram number 7125/28 from Maurice Dejean

    Maurice Dejean summarizes recent reporting done on China by Soviet news agencies.

  • 1964

    Twentieth Session of the United Nations General Assembly, 'Agenda Items Related to Disarmament'

    South African report on the twentieth session of the General Assembly as it relates to nuclear proliferation.