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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • September 30, 1930

    Resolution of the All-Russian Central Executive Committee and Soviet of the People’s Commissars of the RSFSR, 'About the Practical Conduct of Nationalities Policy in the Far East Region in Regard to Chinese and Koreans'

    The All-Russian Central Executive Committee lists inadequacies in meeting the needs of Korean and Chinese laborers in the Far Eastern region of the Soviet Union. Problems include interethnic tensions, inequality in labor conditions, inequality in education, capitalist economic activity, lack of Chinese and Korean in state administration and social organizations, and unsatisfactory implementation of resettlement plans.

  • September 01, 1933

    Primorsk Region Oblispolkom, 'Memorandum Report on the Question of the Criminal Conditions in Building No. 10, 'MILLIONKA'

    Addressed to the Oblispolkom, or district administration and executive committee, this report shows concerns about the Chinese population in the far eastern Primorsky region. The “Millionka” were a series of large apartments that housed thousands of Chinese in the Chinese quarter of the Vladivostok and their destruction was part of a series of Stalinist deportations which targeted the Chinese and Korean populations of the city. This document shows the Soviet administrator's deep suspicion of Asian communities and ethnic connections, which they perceived as mysterious, limitless, transnational, and inevitably related to “banditism,” “hooliganism,” drug use, and various criminal activities. The report identifies the Millionka as home to a wide variety of criminal activity and disorder (drug use, prostitution, blackmarket trade, drunkenness), as well as a source of "an anti-Soviet element with counterrevolutionary goals."

  • March 24, 1954

    Telegram to the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union from the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China

    The Central Committee of the Communist Party of China requests information on two Chinese citizens, Li Qingdong and Shu Fengkui, who had lived in the Soviet Union for a time and claimed to be CPSU members.

  • December 31, 1959

    Memorandum of Conversation with the Deputy Chairmen of the People’s Committee of the City of Shanghai, and the CPC City Committee Candidate, Liu Shuzhou, 16 December 1959

    Liu Shuzou, the CPC City Committee Candidate, describes the Shanghai delegation’s recent one-week educational visit to Leningrad. According to Liu, the delegation was received well by the Leningraders, and the Chinese were impressed by the city, Soviet culture, education, and a general improvement in standard of living

  • March 03, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, ‘Chinese Students Intending to Participate in the Demonstrations Organized by the Vietnamese Students’

    The Chinese Embassy reports that students from Vietnam are organizing a protest against the United States in Moscow and have requested that students from China join the rally.

  • March 04, 1965

    Record of an Important Phone Call, ‘The Soviet Police have Captured and Wounded Chinese and Vietnamese Students who were Protesting against the United States’

    The Chinese Embassy makes an emergency report on the arrest and injuring of Chinese and Vietnamese students following the protests against the United States in Moscow.

  • March 05, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, ‘Reporting on the Talks with the Vietnamese Attaché’

    The Chinese Embassy in Moscow reports how the Vietnamese government plans to protest against the Soviet Union's suppression of student demonstrations.

  • March 05, 1965

    Phone Call with the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union

    Chinese students in the Soviet Union were beaten and arrested by Soviet police during the protests against the US bombing of Vietnam held in Moscow.

  • March 05, 1965

    Cable from the Division of Soviet and East European Affairs to the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry requires additional details and clarifications on the protests in Moscow against the United States.

  • March 05, 1965

    Cable from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to Ambassador Pan Zili, ‘Protest to the Soviet Union over the Soviet Police’s Suppression of the Demonstrations against the US and their Arrest and Wounding of Chinese Students’

    Zhou Enlai gives instructions to Ambassador Pan Zili to issue a formal note of protest to the Soviet Union following the crackdown on Chinese and Vietnamese students protesting against the United States in Moscow.

  • March 05, 1965

    Draft of Note of Protest to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Soviet Union

    The Chinese Embassy in Moscow drafts an official note of protest following the Soviet crackdown on anti-American student protestors in Moscow.

  • March 05, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, ‘On the Situation of the Vietnamese Embassy’s Nguyen Phu’s Report to Zhang Dake’

    The Vietnamese Ambassador meets with the Soviet Ministry of Foreign Affairs following the crackdown on Vietnamese and Chinese student protestors in Moscow.

  • March 05, 1965

    Cable from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union, ‘Soviet Suppression of Student Demonstrations’

    The Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs considers how to respond to the Soviet suppression of student demonstrations in Moscow.

  • March 05, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, ‘Soviet Suppression of Student Demonstrations’

    The Chinese Embassy in Moscow reports on the "barbaric actions" of Soviet police, who injured and arrested students from China and Vietnam, among other countries.

  • March 06, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, ‘On the Number of Vietnamese Students Injured’

    The Chinese Embassy in Moscow suggests that a discrepancy exists in the number of Vietnamese students injured offered by the Vietnamese embassy and the number actually hurt in the Moscow protests.

  • March 08, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, ‘The Vietnamese Report They Have Issued a Non-Public Protest to the Soviets’

    The Chinese Embassy in Hanoi reports that the Vietnamese government has made an approach to the Soviet Union following the suppression of student protests in Moscow.

  • March 08, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, ‘The Situation of the Responses from Vietnamese Students’

    The Chinese Embassy in Moscow reports on the effectiveness of China's broadcasting messages in Russian.

  • March 08, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, ‘The Vietnamese Embassy’s Handling of the Soviet Suppression of Students’

    The Chinese Embassy in Moscow reports on how the Vietnamese government and students plan to deal with the Soviet Union's suppression of student protests in Moscow.

  • March 10, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'Response to the Soviet Inciting of Sino-Vietnamese Relations’

    A Vietnamese student insists that students from China and elsewhere instigated the violent turn in the protests in Moscow.

  • March 10, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, ‘Vietnamese Students' Responses to Soviet Police Suppression of the Protest Rally’

    The Chinese Embassy in Moscow reports that Vietnamese students have become more critical of the Soviet Union following the protests in Moscow.