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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • April 01, 1953

    Explanatory Note from Glukhov to the Ministry of Public Security of the DPRK

    Soviet Union’s role in fabrication of evidence blaming the US for using biological weapons in North Korea.

  • June 02, 1953

    Decision of the Party Control Commission of the CPSU CC regarding Comrade S.D. Ignatiev

    Ignatiev’s dismissal from the CPSU

  • February 06, 1970

    Letter, UNCURK Principal Secretary Kuzbari to UN Chef de Cabinet Narasimhan

    Principal Secretary of UNCURK Zouheir Kuzbari updates Chef de Cabinet C.V. Narasimhan on the request for the repatriation of passengers and crew of the KAL plane that landed in North Korea and the argument between ROK and Japanese governments over a reported germs deal between a Japanese firm and North Korean commercial representatives.

  • February 13, 1970

    Letter, UNCURK Principal Secretary Kuzbari to UN Chef de Cabinet Narasimhan

    Principal Secretary of UNCURK Zouheir Kuzbari updates Chef de Cabinet of the UN C.V. Narasimhan on the alleged Japanese government and DPRK commercial firm's germs deal.

  • February 23, 1970

    Letter, Anti-Communist League Secretary-General Jose Ma. Hernandez, Concerning North Korean Aggressions

    Secretary-General of the World Anti-Communist League Jose Ma. Hernandez raises a call to arms to the Red Cross and United Nations in response to North Korean KAL hijacking and potential biological warfare.

  • September 29, 1987

    Memorandum on South African Military Policy on Biological and Chemical Warfare, and accompanying attachments

    South African Memorandum on the country's military policy on biological and chemical warfare, and accompanying attachments.

  • July, 1991

    National Intelligence Estimate, NIE 5-91C, 'Prospects for Special Weapons Proliferation and Control'

    With the term “weapons of mass destruction” having not yet fully come into general usage, this NIE used the term “special weapons” to describe nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons (formerly the term “special weapons” was sometimes used to describe nuclear weapons only). With numerous excisions, including the names of some countries in the sections on “East Asia and the Pacific” and “Central America,” this wide-ranging estimate provides broad-brushed, sometimes superficial, pictures of the situations in numerous countries along with coverage of international controls to halt sensitive technology exports to suspect countries.