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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • December 03, 1958

    Cuban Communist Party Official Lazaro Peña, Report to the Italian Communist Party (PCI), 'Information on the Political Situation in Cuba'

    A report supplied by the Foreign Section and Cuban comrade Lazaro Peña, Director of the Latin American syndicate, on the political situation in Cuba. It describes the July 26th movement, Cuban relations with the United States, and the Cuban Popular Socialist Party.

  • January 01, 1960

    Italian Communist Angelo Franza, Memorandum of Conversation with Cuban Communist Antonio Nunez Jimenez and note by PCI Official Giuliano Pajetta

    A memorandum of a conversation between PCI official Giuliano Pajetta and Antonio Nunez Jimenez, Director of the Cuban National Institute for Agrarian Reform [INRA] and member of the Cuban PC (Popular Socialist Party [PSP]). They discuss the various problems relating to the internal and external politics in Cuba and the solidarity that the PCI can provide to the Cuban liberation movement.

  • June 16, 1960

    Report of the Governmental Delegation Visiting Argentina and Cuba

    The document includes excerpts from a Bulgarian delegation's report on their visit to Latin America in 1960. The excerpt covers the delegation's visit to Cuba. Avramova and Agnelov report Cuba's desire to establish diplomatic and cultural relations with Bulgaria. Cuba's interest paramountly involve trade. Avramova and Angelov summarize meetings with important government officials, particulalry Ernesto Guevara, head of the National Bank, and Raul Castro, Minister of Armed Forces. Topics include: the development of the revolution against the Batista government, post-Batista power struggles, geographical fatalism and US influence, Cuba's challenges (e.g. illiteracy, the lack of specialists), land and agricultural reform, construction, industrialization. The delegation recommends the establishment of official relations with Cuba and an invitation for Raul Castro to visit Bulgaria.

  • October 27, 1960

    Notes on Swiss Agreement to Represent US Interests in Cuba if US-Cuban Diplomatic Relations Are Broken

    An agreement from the Swiss government to represent U.S. interests in the Cuban crisis, "if Cuban-US diplomatic relations are broken."

  • October 29, 1960

    Information on the VIII Congress of National Socialist Party of Cuba

    In a secret supplement to information from the VIII Congress of the People's Socialist Party, Bulgarian delegates Abramov and Tellalov summarize answers that Blas Roca, the Cuban delegation head, provided the congress. Roca claimed that socialism is the end goal of the revolution, but it is not publicly discussed. He explained the Communist party's involvement in the revolution and July 26th Movement. Abramov and Tellalov also describe the reestablishment of relations and disagreements between Cuba and Yugoslavia, including discussions about weapons. Fidel Castro met with socialist country representatives and described Cuba's plans to nationalize enterprises, particularly American. During the congress Castro described the evolution of the July 26th Movement and the consolidation of Communism in Cuba. Abramov and Tellalov endorse Castro's leadership and review the Cuban military's strengths and weaknesses. There is a brief mention Sino-Soviet relations.

  • January 12, 1961

    Cuban G-2 (military intelligence), “Report on mercenary camps and bases in Guatemala, Nicaragua, and Florida” (forwarded to Cuban President Osvaldo Dorticos Torrado)

    A military intelligence report from the Cuban G-2 service, outlining the miltiary capabilities of nearby Latin American countries, as well as the miltiary situations (uprisings) in many of those same countries.

  • September 28, 1961

    Memorandum of Conversation between Mao Zedong and Cuban President Osvaldo Dorticos

    A conversation about the situation in Brazil. Cuba's diplomatic relations to other countries around the world are also discussed, especially as they relate to the recent U.S. blockade of Cuba.

  • December 02, 1961

    Top Secret Bulgarian Politburo Resolution on Arms Delivery to Cuba

    A proposal from the Minister of Foreign Trade, G. Kambuliev, for the donation to Cuba of 35,000 automatic rifles, recently decommissioned by the Bulgarian military.

  • December 26, 1961

    Memorandum from Mexican Federal Director of Security on 'Political Cuban Refugees'

    The Mexican Federal Director of Security's concern regarding the Directors of the Cuban Revolutionary Council (formerly the Cuban Revolutionary Democratic Front), especially with their disorientation over the withdraw of the U.S. Embassy and the unsuccessful propaganda campaign against Fidel Castro. The Director believes this Council will dissolve soon.

  • January 15, 1962

    Memorandum from Mexican Federal Director of Security re Democratic Revolutionary Front (Cuban)

    A memorandum informing that the Cuban Democratic Revolutionary Front will be disbanding due to insufficient economic means. The Front, however, affirmed that it would continue to meet periodically to maintain a nucleus of resistance against Castro’s tyranny.

  • January 18, 1962

    Report from Cultural Attaché at the Israeli Embassy, Rio de Janeiro, Smeul Benizi, 18 January 1962, Subject: 'Brazil – Cuban-Latin American Relations'

    Cultural Attaché at the Israeli Embassy in Rio de Janeiro, Smeul Benizi, discusses the proposal from Brazil to the Organization of American States (OAS) suggesting that Cuba become a neutral country, like Finland.

  • March 16, 1962

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Beck), Report on the Federal Republic of Germany and Cuba

    Ambassador János Beck reports on diplomatic relations between the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) and Cuba. Beck speculates that FRG does intelligence work for departed Americans. Central to Beck’s report is the fact that Cuba wants to preserve diplomatic relations with as many countries as possible. Relevant is the Hallstein principle and the presence of FRG diplomats and German Democratic Republic’s Political Commission. (There are two self-governing and independent German states in Cuba.)

  • April 02, 1962

    Message from the Italian Communist Party to the Cuban Leadership

    The Italian Communist Party sends a message to the Cuban government expressing their hope that the Organization of American States (OAS) will begin to see the Cuban perspective and that "the decisions of the OAS cannot suspend the Cuban truth from the American continent."

  • April 04, 1962

    Soviet Report on Cuban Proposal to Establish a Soviet Intelligence Center in Cuba

    Report on a conversation between the Cuban Minister of Internal Affairs Ramiro Valdez Menendez and the KGB representative in Havana regarding the former's trip to the Soviet Union. The discussion concerns a Cuban proposal to set up a Soviet intelligence center in the country, which the Soviets turned down.

  • April 14, 1962

    Soviet Report on Havana's Plan to Train Latin American Partisans

    Report on a conversation between the Cuban Minister of Internal Affairs Ramiro Valdez Menendez and the KGB representative on Havana's decision to organize the training of partisan groups in other Latin American countries. For the time being the Cuban would do this by themselves without the help of the Soviet Union. Valdez said that although Havana agreed with the principle of peaceful coexistence, that did not mean that they could not help their brothers in the neighbor countries.

  • May 29, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 29 May 1962

    Jelen says the newspapers have announced a farewell visit of [Soviet Ambassador to Cuba Sergei Mikhailovich] Kudryavtsev with [President of Cuba Osvaldo] Dorticós [Torrado]. Jelen also reports that the recall of Kudryavtsev coincides with the nomination of [Carlos] Olivares [Sanchez] to the position of the ambassador to Moscow. Although Olivares comes from the “26th of July Movement,” he was closely connected with [Anibal] Escalante

  • June 09, 1962

    Soviet Report by Cuban Involvement in Assisting Partisans in Other Latin American Countries

    Report on a conversation between Fidel Castro and Soviet representatives. Castro believed that revolutionary situation has developed in all Central American countries (except Mexico) and a few South American countries. In his opinion, a slight push in the form of armed actions by partisans would rally the peasant masses and bring about regime change. The report also discussed Havana's low opinion of many Latin American Communist Parties. Cuba's bypassing these parties in interfering in the respective countries' affairs worsened the relations between them and Havana.

  • June 13, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 13 June 1962

    Rapacki reports on a meeting with the ORI [Organizaciones Revolucionarias Integradas], including: Fidel Castro, Raul Castro, [President Osvaldo] Dorticos [Torrado], Blas Roca, [and Emilio] Aragones [Navarro]. They discussed general issues of coordinating sugar trade, agricultural policy, policies toward the church, diplomatic visits, and the most current topic of the Escalante affair.

  • June 25, 1962

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Beck), Report on Talk with Cuban President Osvaldo Dorticos on 15 June 1962

    In a top secret report, Hungarian Ambassador to Cuba János Beck describes a recent meeting with Cuban President Osvaldo Dorticos. Beck divides the conversation among five categories—agriculture, industry, central planning, counter-revolutionary activities, and the party. Dorticos reports improvements and obstacles (e.g. agricultural production is developing, though slowly, and the growth of the party remains in its initial stages of formation).

  • September 28, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 28 September 1962

    Jelen discusses a call he received from Foreign Minister Raúl Roa [García] regarding President Osvaldo Dorticós' statement to be made during the general debate of the next UN session. He also says that the "Cuban question has gained much attention" and that "currently there was no danger of [US] military aggression against Cuba."