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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • February 11, 1945

    Yalta Conference Agreement, Declaration of a Liberated Europe

    The text of the agreements reached at the Yalta (Crimea) Conference between President Roosevelt, Prime Minister Churchill and Generalissimo Stalin.

  • September 27, 1946

    Telegram from Nikolai Novikov, Soviet Ambassador to the US, to the Soviet Leadership

    Soviet Ambassador to the US, Nikolai Novikov, describes the advent of a more assertive US foreign policy. Novikov cautions the Soviet leadership that the Truman administration is bent on imposing US political, military and economic domination around the world. This telegram has, since its discovery in the Russian archives, been labelled the Soviet equivalent of US Ambassador to the Soviet Union George Kennan's "Long telegram."

  • December 25, 1951

    Memorandum from Gromyko to Razuvaev

    Gromyko suggests to Stalin, via Razuvaev, to turn down Vyshinsky’s proposal for publishing a communiqué about the American position in the armistice talks.

  • April 05, 1952

    Record of the Conversation of I.V. Stalin and Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan

    Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan and Stalin discuss India's internal politics and stance on foreign policy. Radhakrishnan tells Stalin of India's recent elections and emphasizes that India shares the Soviet Union's stance against capitalism. Radhakrishna also puts forth the question of peaceful co-existence between capitalist and communist spheres, and the possibility for a neutral commission to replace the Cominform and UN. Stalin expresses doubt.

  • July 27, 1953

    Notes on Visit of General Clark with President Rhee (8:30-8:55, 27 July 1953)

    General Clark tries to convince President Rhee to attend the armistice signing, emphasizing that Kim Il Sung will not be present. Ambassador Briggs then reports that President Eisenhower has approved $200 million in aid for Korean rehabilitation.

  • January 15, 1954

    Report, Legation of the Hungarian People’s Republic in Beijing to the Foreign Ministry of Hungary

    Report from the Hungarian Chargé d’Affaires in Beijing which talks about the dispute between China, North Korea and the US over POW's. The report also speculates on the reason for India's position on this issue.

  • April 15, 1954

    The Question of a Conference of the Five Great Powers with the Participation of the PRC

    At a conference of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the USSR, US, Britain and France, the USSR proposes a conference including the PRC, but the others oppose China's participation.

  • June 04, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong and Others, Regarding the Situation at the Eleventh Restricted Session

    Zhou reports on the eleventh restricted session on Indochina. During the session, Zhou opposes using the UN as a supervisory body, and asserts that the joint commission should take major responsibility in implementing the armistice, and that the NNSC's function is to supervise the joint commission's work and the Indochina borders.

  • January 06, 1955

    Record of Meetings between UN Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjold and Zhou Enlai

    Over a series of four meetings, Secretary-General Hammarskjold and Zhou Enlai discuss American prisoners in China, Chinese nationals in the US, and the US-Taiwan defense treaty.

  • October 08, 1956

    Seventh Meeting of the Main Committee, Conference on the Statute of the International Atomic Energy Agency (Statement by South African Ambassador W.C. du Plessis)

    Statement by the South African Ambassador to the United States, W. C. du Plessis, at the Seventh Meeting of the Main Committee of the Conference on the Statute of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held at the United Nations. Du Plessis discusses several amendments intending to improve the representation of African and Middle Eastern countries in the IAEA, as well as several amendments regarding the structure of the organization and the IAEA board.

  • October 26, 1957

    Journal of Soviet Ambassador to the DPRK A.M. Puzanov for 26 October 1957

    Puzanov informs Kim Il Sung of the acceptance of Mongolia, South Korea, and South Vietnam in the UN.

  • November 23, 1958

    Journal Entry of Ambassador Volkov: Conversation with Djuanda

    Notes from the journal of B.M. Volkov, Soviet Ambassador to Indonesia, on a meeting with Djuanda Kartawidjaja, the Prime Minister of Indonesia, on November 20, 1958. Volkov relays an invitation from Khrushchev to Djuanda to visit the Soviet Union and the two discuss details of the visit. They also discuss the establishment of a United Nations armed forces and work on a Soviet-Indonesian economic delegation.

  • September 28, 1960

    Journal of Soviet Ambassador to the DPRK A.M. Puzanov for 28 September 1960

    Puzanov suggests measures to implement during the first five-year plan to further North Korea's economic growth. Puzanov also informs Pak Seong-cheol of a change to Khrushchev's scheduled visit to the DPRK.

  • October 10, 1960

    Dictated by Cde. N. S. Khrushchev on 10 October 1960

    Khrushchev reports on the proceedings at the United Nations in New York and his delegation's travel plans for returning to Moscow. He mentions his approval of plans to purchase buildings in New York for Ukrainian and Belorussian missions to the UN. He also suggests that they purchase an American car to bring back for the benefit of Soviet auto designers. He concludes with criticisms of the United States and New York.

  • January 20, 1961

    John F. Kennedy's Inaugural Address

    Kennedy's inaugural address, in which he discusses US foreign policy and relations with the rest of the world, especially the Eastern Bloc.

  • June 05, 1961

    Telegram from Nesti Nase, the Albanian ambassador to the USSR, to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Albania

    Nase writes that the Soviet government carefully attempts to give the conference of non-aligned countries an anti-imperialist and anti-colonialist character. The Soviet position on these issues is based on the resolution prepared by Asian and African countries in the 15th session of the UN on disarmament, which in the end was not voted upon, and on the declaration on decolonization approved by the UN.

  • August 03, 1961

    Walter Ulbricht's Speech at the Moscow Conference, 3-5 August 1961

    Ulbricht speaks at the Moscow Conference of Secretaries of the Central Committees of the Communist and Workers' Parties of Socialist Countries for the Exchange of Opinions on Questions Concerning the Preparation and Conclusion of a German Peace Treaty.

  • September 03, 1961

    Telegram from the Albanian ambassador in Belgrade, Tahmaz Beqari, to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Albania

    The ambassador reports on the proceedings of the Belgrade conference of non-aligned countries, and about the differences and nuances of the stances of various delegations. Except India, Libya, and the United Arab Republic, all delegations were in favor of China’s participation in the United Nations. In addition, Nehru pointed out that colonialism is in agony while the Ghanaian, Cuban, Iraqi, Nepalese and Ethiopian delegations claimed to the contrary. When Dorticós, the Cuban President, began unmasking American imperialism, the diplomats of Western countries left the conference. The diplomats of friendly countries, according to Beqari, called the speeches of the conference “80% positive.”

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet delegate to the United Nations V. A. Zorin to USSR Foreign Ministry

    Preparation for an upcoming meeting with acting UN Secretary U Thant, a meeting with the Soviet Union that will take place between U Thant’s meetings with the US and Cuba. Zorin says they will transmit Khrushchev’s message during the meeting that the Soviet agrees with U Thant’s proposal of holding a negotiation for a peaceful settlement in the Caribbean region. He also says the Soviet should expect the US would not agree to the suspension of “quarantine” activity only after the removal of “offensive weaponry” from Cuba. Soviet, however, would insist the negotiation to be based on U Thant’s proposal of suspending arms stockpiling in Cuba, which is supported by neutral countries.

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Moscow (Paszkowski), 27 October 1962

    [First Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs Vasili Vasilyevich] Kuznetsov assessed the [UN] resolution of Ghana and the United Arab Republic [Egypt] as kind of a band-aid, but a one that nevertheless is significant. On the other hand, he considers the statement of the Afro-Asian nations as both good and strong.