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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • December 16, 1949

    Record of Conversation between I.V. Stalin and Chairman of the Central People's Government of the People's Republic of China Mao Zedong on 16 December 1949

    First meeting between Mao and Stalin. The two discuss war and peace, as well as the question of the new treaty between China and the USSR. Stalin voices himself against signing a new treaty, citing the Yalta agreement. Mao promises to reconsider his position. Mao says he is in favor of keeping Soviet troops in Port Arthur. Stalin promises not to "run away" from China. Mao requests a credit of 300 million dollars, as well as the Soviet aid in liberating Taiwan. Stalin warns Mao not to give the Americans a pretext to intervene in China. Mao says that several countries are interested in establishing diplomatic relations with China but that China should wait before doing so. Stalin agrees with this strategy.

  • January 07, 1950

    Telegram, Mao Zedong to Zhou Enlai and CCP CC

    Mao Zedong reviews New China's foreign trade and foreign economic relations.

  • January 18, 1950

    Telegram, Mao Zedong to Liu Shaoqi

    Mao Zedong gives Liu Shaoqi guidance on Chinese foreign policy towards the United States and Great Britain.

  • January 31, 1950

    Memorandum of Conversation, Charge d’Affaires of the Soviet Embassy with Chinese Foreign Minister Zhou Enlai on 9 December 1949

    Description of a discussion between the Soviet Charge d'Affaires in the PRC and Zhou Enlai, covering Mao Zedong's trip to Moscow and recognition of the PRC by England, Burma, and India.

  • July 20, 1951

    Ciphered Telegram from Mao Zedong to Filippov [Stalin]

    Telegram from Mao to Stalin discussing the points of agreement and disagreement between the Korean-Chinese and Anglo-American representatives of armistice negotiations.

  • April 26, 1954

    Cable from Zhou Enlai, 'Regarding Speeches at the Conference and the Situation at the First Plenary Session'

    Zhou Enlai reports on some last minute agreements regarding the conference procedures. It is decided that the Korean delegation will speak first, and that Thailand, Britain, and the Soviet Union will take turns chairing the conference.

  • April 28, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong, Liu Shaoqi, and CCP Central Committee (excerpt)

    In his telegram, Zhou Enlai informs Mao Zedong, Liu Shaoqi, and CCP Central Committee about the first days of the Geneva Conference. Discussion on the Korea question has already entered a deadlock and it seems that the Chinese, French, and Russian delegations have arranged to meet outside the conference to discuss Indochina.

  • May 01, 1954

    Cable from Zhou Enlai, 'Regarding a Meeting with British Foreign Secretary Eden'

    Zhou Enlai, Molotov, and Eden discuss the Korea issue, the Indochina issue, Sino-British relations, British-American relations, and the issue of five powers.

  • May 14, 1954

    Minutes of Conversation between Zhou Enlai and Anthony Eden

    Zhou Enlai and Anthony Eden discuss Geneva Conference proceedings related to the Korea and Indochina issues. Zhou expresses concerns for the French proposal on Indochina and states that China supports the North Vietnamese proposal. Zhou and Eden agree that a military armistice should be decided on, although they disagree on specific issues surrounding an armistice.

  • May 19, 1954

    Minutes of the Talk between Huan Xiang and Humphrey Trevelyan on the Return of Chinese and US Nationals to Their Respective Countries (Excerpt)

    Trevelyan offered to mediate the issue of Chinese and American expatriates as a private person. Huan Xiang replied by affirming that US nationals were free to leave China while many Chinese were not allowed to leave the US. He declared to have no authority on the mediation request and would consult with related people.

  • May 27, 1954

    Minutes of the Talk between Huan Xiang and Trevelyan on the Return of Chinese and US Nationals to their Respective Countries (Excerpt)

    Huan Xiang reaffirmed that Beijing did not deny exit permits for Americans while the US prevented many Chinese nationals from leaving the US. He agreed to talk to the US either directly or through Trevelyan's introduction. Trevelyan said that he did not know the US attitude on this issue and would contact Huan Xian in a few days.

  • June 22, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong and Others, Regarding Talks with Eden

    Zhou reports on a meeting with Eden. In this meeting the two discuss the proposals on Laos and Cambodia. They also agree that the foreign ministers return to the conference regularly to see that their military representatives are productive.

  • October 19, 1954

    Minutes of Chairman Mao Zedong’s First Meeting with Nehru

    Mao Zedong and Nehru discuss Sino-Indian relations, the political situation in Asia, and the role of the United States in world politics.

  • October 23, 1954

    Minutes of Chairman Mao Zedong’s Second Meeting with Nehru

    Mao and Nehru have an extensive discussion about global affairs, the legacy of World War II, and the likelihood of another world war.

  • January 10, 1955

    Cable from Feng Xuan, 'Reaction of Britain, United States, France towards the Kuala Lumpur Five Countries inviting China to attend the Afro-Asian Conference'

    The UK responded the decision of inviting China to attend the Asian-African Conference with anger, stating that countries in the Bogor Conference had wrong expectations toward China. The US feared that China would have great influence on the Asian-African Conference and thus weaken US influence in the region. The US and UK also worried that China’s participation would improve China-Japan relations. French press expressed this decision as the evidence of the failure of the US power in Southeast Asia.

  • February 25, 1955

    Abstract of Conversation: Chinese Premier Zhou receives Trevelyan

    Zhou Enlai and Trevelyan debated on the nature of the Manila Treaty and its implications for the Geneva Agreement.They also discussed the issue of the Dai Autonomous Region between China and Thailand and the legal status of Taiwan.

  • March 27, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Compilation of the Excerpts of the Telegrams Concerning the Asian-African Conference'

    The collection of telegrams covers the procedure and agenda about the Asian-African Conference, the arguments about China’s participation in the Conference, the attempts of the US and the UK to influence the Conference, and the attitudes of various countries toward the Conference.

  • April 10, 1955

    Minutes of the Meeting between Zhang Yue and Sir John Addis

    Zhang Yue informed Interim Charge d’affaires of Hong Kong Sir John Addis of the Taiwanese plan to assassinate the Chinese journalist delegate to the Asian-African Conference when they passed through Hong Kong and asked the Hong Kong authorities to pay attention to this matter.

  • April 16, 1955

    Minutes of Conversation Between British Interim Charge d’Affaires of Hong Kong John Addis and Deputy Department Head Zhang Yue

    A Chinese Foreign Ministry representative asks for the government of Singapore to ensure the safety of the Bandung-bounded aircraft carrying Zhou Enlai.

  • April 28, 1955

    Chinese Foreign Ministry Reference Document No.1

    Chinese Reference Document No. 1 which includes the following articles: Ike says to correspondents that the USA is willing to hold direct negotiations with New China Britain wishes to be a loyal mediator between New China and the USA Burmese newspapers’ comments on Taiwan issue Nehru, Nasir and others speak to correspondents in Calcutta Menzies’s comments on Zhou Enlai’s proposal Kotalawela’s comment on the Asian-African Conference USA and Red China Bright prospect Bright prospect The Five States of the Colombo Conference and the USA Comments of the prime ministers of India, Pakistan and Egypt on the Asian-African Conference The Bandung Conference The Five States of the Colombo Conference and the USA. Allen’s comments on the Asian-African Conference Pakistan and Egypt on the Asian-African Conference