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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • September 04, 1930

    Imre Nagy’s OGPU (Unified State Political Directorate) Enlistment

    Certificate signed by Imre Nagy upon enlistment in the OGPU secret police (later the NKVD).

  • March 10, 1938

    Report on Imre Nagy’s Arrest by the NKVD (Commissariat of Internal Affairs)

    Matusov and Altman report on Nagy's arrest on 4/5 March 1938 and subsequent release on 8 March, and describe some of his work.

  • June, 1941

    Report from the People’s Committee of Internal Affairs to the Central Committee of the Hungarian Communist Party, about Agent 'Volodya' (Imre Nagy)

    Sverdlov provides a brief overview of agent "Volodya" (Imre Nagy) and his work.

  • January 01, 1953

    Soviet Plan to Assassinate Tito

    NKVD plan to assassinate Josip Broz Tito by a Soviet covert agent, codenamed “Max.” The plan envisions assassinating Tito during a private audience during Tito’s forthcoming visit to London, or at a diplomatic reception in Belgrade. This document was not dated.

  • June 22, 1954

    Letter from Nikita S. Khrushchev, First Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, to Josip Broz Tito and the Central Committee of the League of Communists Of Yugoslavia

    Letter from Soviet leader Nikita S. Khrushchev to Yugoslav leader Josep B. Tito suggesting that the time is ripe for a rapprochement between the two states and parties. Blaming former NKVD chief Lavrenty Beria and former Yugoslav leadership member Milovan Djilas for doing the work of the imperialists by attempting to drive a wedge between the Soviet and Yugoslav people and parties, Khrushchev suggests that the ousting of both will increase rapprochement between the two countries and be the catalyst for a a summit between the two leaders.

  • October 24, 1956

    International Operations Division, Guidance to Radio Liberation from New York on Satellite Situation

    The International Operations Division officer responsible for Radio Liberty notes to Cord Meyer his disagreement with RL’s policy of avoiding all commentary on the Hungarian Revolution. He cites Meyer’s intention to discuss the issue with AMCOMLIB president Sargeant.

  • March 12, 1958

    Report from Gen. M. Spasov on Multilateral Security Meeting in Bucharest

    A report by the Deputy Minister of Internal Affairs, Mircho Spasov, on the Ministerial Meeting in Bucharest of delegations from Romania, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and the Soviet Union. The meeting called for focusing on preventing subversive acts of Western intelligence, improving exchange of information, and conducting joint operations.

  • April 27, 1960

    Letter from Chairman of the USSR Committee of State Security A. Shelepin to Deputy Chairman and Minister of Internal Affairs of Czechoslovakia Rudolf Barák

    The USSR Committee of State Security agrees to send a delegation to a conference of leaders of other socialist security services to be held in Prague.

  • June 07, 1960

    Note from KGB Chairman A. Shelepin to Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, Regarding Plan to Discredit CIA Chief Dulles

    Shelepin sets out a plan to discredit CIA chief Allen Dulles.

  • March 06, 1961

    Protocol on the joint negotiations of the Czechoslovak Interior Ministry delegation and the delegation of KGB border troops

    The Czechoslovak and Soviet delegations discussed the fulfillment of the 1958 joint proceedings on Soviet border troops, further coordination of the border organs of both parties, the relay of technical equipment at the border and joint actions for border searches. Also on the agenda was the easing of border passage in times of emergency for citizens of both states.

  • July 08, 1961

    Letter from Chairman of the USSR Committee of State Security A. Shelepin to Minister of Internal Affairs of Czechoslovakia Lubomír Štrougal

    The Soviet Committee of State Security invites a delegation of senior officials from Czechoslovakian Ministry of Internal Affairs to visit Moscow.

  • June 12, 1962

    Record of a Conversation about the Results of Cooperation and Further Coordination of Intelligence and Counterintelligence Activities between the MVD of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the KGB under the USSR Council of Ministers

    Discussion about potential exchange of intelligence and assistance between the two intelligence agencies.

  • April 26, 1963

    Agreement between the Soviet and Czechoslovak state security bodies on the terms of delivery for specialized technology and the related bookkeeping procedure

    This document details how to improve ties between the state security forces of the Soviet Union and Czechoslovak Republic. It refers to the terms of direct delivery of specialized technology associated with a military delivery plan. There is also discussion on bookkeeping methods so both nations can register the delivery. The protocol is designed to improve coordination of reciprocal deliveries of specialized technology.

  • June 24, 1963

    Agreement between representatives of Soviet and Czechoslovak security authorities on how to enhance security coordination

    This agreement between the representatives of seven Soviet and seven Czechoslovak security agencies relates to enhanced security coordination between the two countries. The parties agree to share technological changes, various resources and intelligence that is relevant to state security.

  • December 02, 1964

    Stasi Report on Meetings with the KGB, 30 November-1 December 1964

    Meetings between KGB Chairman Semichastny and East German Minister for State Security Mielke. Topics of discussion include Lyndon B. Johnson's recent election in the United States, Khrushchev's ouster from the Kremlin, Sino-Soviet relation, and Khrushchev's son-in-law Alexei Adzhubei.

  • March 26, 1965

    Record of a Conversation between Representatives of the USSR Committee of State Security and the Ministry of Internal Affairs of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic Concerning Questions of the Cooperation of the Covert Inspection of Mail Services

    The CSSR and the USSR intelligence services agree to share information regarding suspicious mail correspondence.

  • July 04, 1965

    Summary Record of the Discussions CSSR MVD and KGB Delegations

    This report summarizes extended cooperation measures undertaken by representatives of the Czechoslovak and Soviet security agencies. Methods to increase cooperation include the exchange of operational and scientific technology and enhanced coordination between operational agencies to combat espionage and ideological diversion.

  • December 06, 1965

    Letter from the Committee for State Security of the Council of Ministers of the USSR on Aid to the Ministry for State Security of the DRV

    Letter describing technical assistance given to the Ministry for State Security of the DRV, including surveillance equipment.

  • June 16, 1966

    Plan of the Reception of a CSSR MVD Delegation Arriving in Moscow on 21 June 1966

    Agenda and time table for the delegation's visit.

  • January 11, 1967

    Cooperation between the Czechoslovak and Cuban Intelligence Services

    The report introduces Czechoslovak's assistance in the Operation MANUEL after the isolation of socialist Castro regime. Cuba looked for alternative routes in Europe in order to promote and influence the revolutionary movement in Latin America. Czechoslovakia assistance in the operation is of a strictly technical nature and its intelligence service is doing its utmost to protect the interests of the country by securing all technical matters. The report says that terminating the assistance was not possible for both practical and political reasons-- all direct flights between Czechoslovakia and Cuba would be suspended and a drastic cooling off of relations between two governments. Czechoslovak's refusal in assisting the operation would be interpreted as a political decision to suspend assistance to the national liberation movement in Latin America countries. However, the reports says that the assistance of Czechoslovak intelligence service to the operation is in no way amounts to agreeing with its political content and constitutes a minor aspect of intelligence work. The Soviet intelligence was also involved in organizing the operation in Moscow and offered assistance to its Cuban counterpart.