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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October, 1947

    Telegram to Vyshinsky in New York

    Discusses the Korean question. One idea is that it might be resolved based upon the Moscow Agreement of 1945. Other suggestions include proposing to the Americans that both the Americans and the Soviets take back all their troops from Korean soil, and that if talks are going to be held, representatives from both North and South Korea must be present.

  • October 23, 1947

    Letter from Molotov to Stalin

    Molotov stating that according to Stalin's direction Vyshinsky's telegram about the Korean problem will be revised.

  • November 14, 1947

    The Problem of the Independence of Korea

    UN Resolution 112 (II), "The Problem of the Independence of Korea," calls for elections to be held and for foreign troops to withdraw in order to achieve the unification of the Korean Peninsula.

  • July 11, 1948

    Record of Conversation between Kim Gu and Liu Yuwan

    Kim Gu (Kim Koo) and the Chinese Nationalist Minister Liu Yuwan discuss Kim's participation in the South Korean government, his attendance at a conference in Pyongyang, and the possibility of a Russian-led attack on southern Korea.

  • December 12, 1948

    The Problem of the Independence of Korea

    After accepting the United Nations Temporary Commission on Korea's report on the validity of the South Korean election, the UN General Assembly passes Resolution 195 to recognize the Republic of Korea as a legitimate government on the Korean Peninsula.

  • March 22, 1949

    National Security Council Report, NSC 8/2, "Position of the United States with Respect to Korea"

    Report by the National Security Council to the President on US policy objectives regarding Korea.

  • April 20, 1949

    The Korean Issue at the Third General Assembly of the United Nations

    Published by the Society for the Study of International Problems in 1949, this book contains a compilation of letters and news from 1948 that cover North Korea's position toward the Korean issue at the United Nations.

  • September 03, 1949

    Telegram from Shtykov to Vyshinsky

    Kim Il Sung, having recieved intelligence suggesting South Korea intended to seize the Ongjin Peninsula, requests Soviet permission to move further into South Korea.

  • September 14, 1949

    Telegram from Tunkin to the Soviet Foreign Ministry in Reply to 11 September Telegram

    North Korea plans to attack South Korea, but the Soviet Foreign Ministry is skeptical about North Korea's actual military capabilities and generally disproves of North Korea's plans.

  • September 24, 1949

    Politburo Decision to Confirm the Following Directive to the Soviet Ambassador in Korea

    The Soviet Politburo argues that North Korea is not ready to launch a successful overthrow of the South Korean regime and suggests North Korea should concentrate its efforts on developing partisan groups in South Korea.

  • January 19, 1950

    Telegram Shtykov to Vyshinsky on a Luncheon at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the DPRK

    Shtykov reports a meeting with Kim Il Sung, along with Chinese and Korean delegates. Kim Il Sung expresses his view on the prospect of a liberation of the South Korean people that is to follow the Chinese success in liberation. Kim expresses his view that the South Koreans support his cause for reunification which the South Korean government does not seem to purse, and that he desires to ask Stalin for permission on an offensive action on South Korea.

  • January 31, 1950

    Telegram from the USSR Ambassador to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to Stalin

    As a response to Stalin's willingness to talk to Kim Il Sung on the issue of offensive attack to South Korea and on Stalin's request of lead, Kim Il Sung, according to Shtykov, responded that he would like to set up a meeting with him, and that he would take necessary measures for the lead to be delivered to the Soviet Union.

  • March 21, 1950

    Telegram from Shtykov to Vyshinski regarding meeting with Kim Il Sung

    Shtykov reports on his meeting with Kim Il Sung where Kim Il Sung requests a meeting with Stalin in Moscow.

  • May 13, 1950

    Cable from Roshchin to Stalin, Relaying Mao's Request for Clarification on North Korea Taking Action Against South Korea

    The telegram relays a request from Mao, conveyed via Chinese Foreign Minister Zhou Enlai, seeking Stalin’s “personal clarifications” of his stand on a potential North Korean action to reunify the country. Mao sought the information after hearing a report from Kim, who had arrived that day in the Chinese capital for a secret two-day visit and clearly claimed that he had received Stalin’s blessing.

  • May 14, 1950

    Cable from Vyshinsky to Mao Zedong, Relaying Stalin's Stance on Permission for North Korea to attack South Korea

    The cable contains Stalin’s personal response to Mao's 13 May telegram. Using the code-name “Filippov,” Stalin confirms his agreement with the North Korean proposal to “move toward reunification,” contingent on Beijing’s assent.

  • May 16, 1950

    Telegram from Filippov to Mao Zedong

    Stalin notifies Mao Zedong that he believes the signing of a treaty pact between China and North Korea should only come after Korean reunification.

  • June 25, 1950

    Report of the DPRK Ministry of Internal Affairs

    A report from the North Korea Ministry of Internal Affairs on an alleged offensive carried out by South Korean forces and the official start of the Korean War.

  • June 25, 1950

    United Nations Security Council Resolution 82, on Korea

    The Security Council makes a complaint of aggression by North Korean forces upon the Republic of Korea

  • July 14, 1950

    Letter from Kim Il Sung to Soviet Government

    Kim Il Sung concurs with Stalin’s disapproval of the English appeal to remove the People's Army from the 38th parallel and considers the Korea question should be taken to UNSC.

  • September 23, 1950

    CPSU Politburo Decision to Adopt the Attached Draft Response

    Telegram telling Vyshinsky to inform Lancaster that Malik consented to a meeting with the assistant Ahesona or one of the American ambassadors, as suggested by Lancaster. Malik should listen to the State Department official and if it's evident that the Americans are taking a step forward towards a peaceful settlement of the Korean question, tell him that Malik should ponder the issues mentioned in the conversation.