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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • February 11, 1945

    Yalta Conference Agreement, Declaration of a Liberated Europe

    The text of the agreements reached at the Yalta (Crimea) Conference between President Roosevelt, Prime Minister Churchill and Generalissimo Stalin.

  • May 08, 1945

    Act of Military Surrender, Germany

    English text of the official act of military surrender to the Allied and Soviet forces signed by German High Command.

  • May 06, 1946

    From the Diary of V.M. Molotov, Reception of the Chinese Ambassador to France, Jing Tai, on 6 May 1946 at 3:00 p.m. in the Soviet Embassy in Paris

    The conversation is concerning the "German question" in terms of the conditions and aftermath of the surrender. PR China sees the negotiation on Germany as becoming an agreement that might apply similar to the question on the Japanese surrender. For this reason Jing Tai asks Molotov to allow China to take part in the negotiations on Germany. The trials of Japanese war criminals were also discussed.

  • October 26, 1946

    Answers to the Questions of Mr. H. Bailey, President of the American Agency 'United Press'

    In an interview, Stalin discusses the political developments in Europe and the Soviet Union and the threat of conflict with the West. Particular emphasis is paid to Germany and Eastern Europe.

  • June 14, 1948

    Central Intelligence Agency Report, "Effects of Soviet Restrictions on the US Position in Berlin"

    Describes effect of Soviet restrictive measures in Berlin on US intelligence and propaganda activities and on operations of the joint military government.

  • September 28, 1948

    Central Intelligence Agency Report, "Consequences of a Breakdown in Four-Power Negotiations on Germany"

    Summarizes Soviet objectives and strategies in entering into Four-Power discussions about Berlin and Germany.

  • December 10, 1948

    Central Intelligence Agency Memorandum for the President on the Situation in Berlin

    CIA Memorandum for President Truman on US position on Soviet actions in Berlin.

  • October 01, 1949

    Gromyko's diary entry of 1 October 1949

    Gromyko's entry of 1 October 1949, in his daily record, detailing his individual meetings with American Ambassador Kirk, British Ambassador Kelly, and French Charge d'Affaires Frankfort.

  • September 16, 1950

    Resolution of the Central Committee, September 16, 1950, to revise a diplomatic note on the question of general elections in Germany and Gromyko's note to Stalin on this matter.

    Gromyko’s 14 September 1950 note to Stalin about a diplomatic note to US, UK, and France on the process for general elections in Germany; and the Central Committee’s 16 September 1950 decision to seek revision of the diplomatic note.

  • September 22, 1950

    Communication from Gromyko to Stalin Concerning a Draft Reply to the United States, England, and France on the Matter of the National Police of the German Democratic Republic, 22 September 1950

    Communication from Gromyko to Stalin Concerning a Draft Reply to the United States, England, and France on the Matter of the National Police of the German Democratic Republic, 22 September 1950

  • December 04, 1950

    Memorandum of Conversation Between the Chinese Ambassador to the USSR and Gromyko

    Their discussion involves the idea of a definite Soviet victory in Korea, the failure of US soldiers and President Truman, the internal politics of the US; internal politics of China, the progress of the decision about Germany among the Soviets as well as other Western powers.

  • October 09, 1952

    Record of S. Radhakrishnan’s Meeting with the FRG President

    Radhakrishnan discusses German unification with the President of West Germany, touches on India's independent stances on foreign policy issues in China, Japan, and Korea, and speaks at length about Russia's internal policies. Radhakrishnan summarizes a previous discussion with Stalin, in detail, discussing Soviet approaches to religion (compared with Indian approaches), and Stalin's strong denial of accusations of aggression: Radhakrishnan says that he is "convinced that Stalin and Russia are gripped by sincere fears of a Western attack." Radhakrisnan concludes by expressing his hope that Germany can unify.

  • October 17, 1952

    Notes of S. Radhakrishnan’s Meeting with the East German Foreign Minister

    Radhakrishnan speaks, unofficially, with Wilhelm Pieck. Radhakrishna asks the GDR about the prospect of German reunificaition, and the GDR responds that it is open to this possibility, but criticizes the involvement of "Western imperialists" with West Germany politicians as a main factor preventing reunification.

  • April 18, 1953

    Memorandum on the German Question, from Georgi Pushkin and Mikhail Gribanov to Vyacheslav Molotov

    Memorandum summarizing the state of discussions between the Soviet Union and the Western powers on various issues regarding Germany, including political, economic and unification issues.

  • April 18, 1953

    Memorandum from Ivan Turginov, 'On the Western Powers’ Policy regarding the German Question'

    Ivan Turginov reports on the policies of the Western powers on the German Question. Special emphasis is given to the public opinion in western countries with regard to Western and Soviet policies towards occupied Germany.

  • April 28, 1953

    Soviet Foreign Ministry Memorandum, 'Regarding Further Measures of the Soviet Government on the German Question'

    Memorandum on further issues regarding the German Question. The memorandum discusses further actions to be taken by the Soviet leadership in order to respond to developments in the Western controlled sectors of Germany and to increase Soviet influence with the German people.

  • May 02, 1953

    Memorandum from Vladimir Semyonov to Vyacheslav Molotov Evaluating the Prospects for a Successful Resolution of the German Question

    Memorandum to Soviet Foreign Minister Molotov on German reunification. The memorandum reviews the developments following the East German proposal of an "all German" conference and the Soviet proposal for a German peace treaty.

  • May 05, 1953

    Vladimir Semyonov, 'Memorandum on the German Question'

    Memorandum on Soviet policy regarding German unification including meetings with the United States, England, and France on an All-German Conference and need for future discussion. Also addressed is Soviet relations with East Germany in the forms of military assistance and economic aid for reparations.

  • May 08, 1953

    USSR Foreign Ministry Draft Memorandum, 'On Further Soviet Government Measures Pertaining to the German Question'

    Memorandum from the Soviet Foreign Affairs Ministry on Soviet foreign policy options with regard to the German Question. The memorandum looks at the effects on Soviet policy toward the western powers in the context of the Postdam conference and at the future state of the Soviet-East German relations.

  • May 15, 1953

    Memorandum from the Soviet Ministry of Internal Affairs to Vladimir Semyonov, 'On the Question of Preventing the Defection of Inhabitants from the GDR to West Germany'

    The large-scale migration of GDR’s population to West Germany is becoming a major issue in Germany. The SCC in Germany, the SED, and GDR government discuss and outline measures for preventing this defection in the future.