Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

SEARCH RESULTS

  • October 07, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Delegation at the 17th Session of the UN General Assembly (Afonso Arinos), New York

    A telegram from the Brazilian delegation to the UN General Assembly describing the impacts and opinions of the U.S. economic sanctions against Cuba from the understanding of the Eastern European and "Iron Curtain countries."

  • October 08, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Embassy in Havana (de Gamboa)

    A telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Cuba describing the speech of Cuban President Dorticós, in the UN, as extremely ponderous and even conservative, by Cuban standards. Dorticos alluded at length to the North-American threats against Cuba, evidencing therefore, one more time, the “complex of invasion” that has motivated in large measures the comportment of the revolutionary government in international politics. Dorticos affirmed, moreover, that Cuba desires a “policy of peace and of coexistence” with all countries of the Continent, within an “absolute respect to the principle of non-intervention.”

  • October 08, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Delegation at the 17th UN General Assembly

    Cuban President Osvaldo Dorticos says in a meeting with Afonso Arinos de Mello-Franco that Cuba does not desire to be armed more than it has to for defense. They also discuss United States interference in Cuban affairs.

  • October 22, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Delegation at the Annual Conferences of CIES (Celso Furtado), Mexico City

    US Secretary of the Treasury C. Douglas Dillon tells the Brazilian delegation that he must leave the Annual Conference of Cities in Mexico because the situation between the US and Cuba is too volatile and "he could not say if there will be or not a world nuclear war by the weekend."

  • October 22, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Delegation at the Annual Conference of CIES (Celso Furtado), Mexico City (Part II)

    Furtado, in a follow-up telegram to his earlier message, recalls the impression that the American government considered the speech of Kennedy as an ultimatum to the USSR on the Cuban question.

  • October 22, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Washington (Campos)

    A report from the Brazilian Embassy in Washington, D.C. about several meetings and consultations between the principal members and organs of the government (Kennedy, Johnson, etc.), especially of the Department of State and the Pentagon.Campos believes that an elaborate decision of great significance is in progress and that this decision may refer to Berlin or to Cuba or to the situation of the conflict between India and China.

  • October 23, 1962

    Telegram from Mexican Foreign Ministry to Mexican Embassy, Rio de Janeiro

    A telegram from the Mexican Foreign Ministry to the Mexican Embassy in Brazil describing a United States resolution was approved. The resolution contains two fundamental points: that Soviet bases in Cuba will be dismantled, and that authorization was given for member states to adopt individual or collective measures including the use of armed force. The resolution was voted for in parts and Mexico, Brazil, and Bolivia abstained from voting on the second part. The impression of the Mexican Foreign Ministry is that the present international situation is of great seriousness.

  • October 23, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Foreign Ministry to Brazilian Delegation at the OAS, Washington

    Brazilian officials are suggesting the Brazilian government vote for the part of the North American resolution that prescribes the arms embargo and the inspections of ships that demand ports in Cuba.

  • October 23, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Embassy in Washington (Campos), 1 p.m., Tuesday

    Suggestion for a decision to internationalize the Cuban crisis would permit Cuba and the Soviet Union to "save face", diminishing the dangerous possibility of direct confrontation.

  • October 23, 1962

    Memorandum of Telephone Conversation between Mexican Foreign Ministry official and Mexican Ambassador to Brazil

    The Brazilian and Mexican diplomats to Cuba weigh in on their respective governments' opinions on the Cuban crisis and increasing U.S.-Cuban tensions.

  • October 23, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Embassy in Washington (Campos), 7 p.m. Tuesday

    A report of the meeting between OAS officials and the descisions that were made regarding the Cuban crisis. Secretary Martin puts forward that, soon, there will be fully disseminated, to convince Latin American public opinion of the gravity of the threat, photographs of the remote-controlled missiles in Cuba.

  • October 23, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Washington (Campos)

    A report on Secretary of State Dean Rusk's discussion of the severity of the American reaction to the installation of remote-controlled missiles of medium and intermediate range in Cuba by the Soviet Union.

  • October 24, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Washington (Campos), 5:15 p.m., Wednesday

    A telegram from Campos informing the Secretary of State that President Kennedy is suggesting the postponement of his visit to Brazil in light of the international tension.

  • October 24, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 5 p.m., Wednesday

    The Brazilian Embassy in Cuba describes that the situation has become difficult as the supply of foodstuffs and other articles for members of this Embassy and for the asylum-seekers has become difficult to obtain.

  • October 24, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Delegation to the OAS, Washington, 9:30 p.m., Wednesday

    A telegram from the Delegation of Brazil at the Organization of American States in Washington, DC describing the actions that were taken and one the votes that was cast at the most recent meeting of the Council.

  • October 24, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro (Barišić) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    A telegram from the Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro to the Yugoslav Foreign Ministry relaying a message from "Brazilian Ambassador in Washington [Roberto de Oliveira Campos] says that the USA is getting ready for military intervention in Cuba. The approximate plan is that US planes will start bombing Cuba in the places where there are alleged bases with nuclear weapons and that will be as soon as Cuba refuses to accept the UN Commission for disarmament."

  • October 24, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Washington (Campos), 5 p.m., Wednesday

    A telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Washington suggesting that the inspection of Cuban territory should be transfered from the U.S. to an international group.

  • October 24, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro (Barišić) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    A telegram from the Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro to the Yugoslav Foreign Ministry discussing the Cuban Missile Crisis and U.S.-USSR-Cuban relations. It says, the "American arguments in favor of the military blockade of Cuba are: firstly, they have solid proof that Cuba will get atomic weapons; secondly, Kennedy must take more severe measures because of the internal pressure, that’s why his option is blockade, although he is trying to transfer this issue to the UNO [United Nations Organization] in order to alleviate the pressure on himself; thirdly, transferring Cuba’s issue to the UNO he is creating a precedent against unilateral USSR actions in Berlin."

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from Mexican Embassy, New Delhi

    A Mexican diplomat in New Delhi is requesting more information on Brazil’s offer to mediate Cuba conflict and the possibility of Mexico joining that mediation.

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 12:45 p.m., Thursday

    An attempt to assure the Secretary of State for External Relations, at Minister Roa's request, of the total falsity of the accusation that, in Cuba, there exists any offensive armament and that Cuba solely desires effective guarantees in respect to its integrity and sovereignty and is ready even to dissolve its Army.