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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • September 11, 1949

    Telegram from Gromyko to Tunkin at the Soviet Embassy in Pyongyang

    The Soviet Union sends a set of questions to Kim Il Sung on about the South Korean army and North Korea's war plans.

  • September 14, 1949

    Telegram from Tunkin to the Soviet Foreign Ministry in Reply to 11 September Telegram

    North Korea plans to attack South Korea, but the Soviet Foreign Ministry is skeptical about North Korea's actual military capabilities and generally disproves of North Korea's plans.

  • September 15, 1949

    Telegram from Shtykov to Stalin

    A description of the political and economic situation in South and North Korea, and on the presence of the struggling democratic and reactionary forces and their influence among the people. Attached are three appendices on the combat and strength of the South Korean and the People's Army of North Korea, the amount of weapons in the People's Army, and the amount of ammunition in the People's Army as of August 1, 1949.

  • September 24, 1949

    Politburo Decision to Confirm the Following Directive to the Soviet Ambassador in Korea

    The Soviet Politburo argues that North Korea is not ready to launch a successful overthrow of the South Korean regime and suggests North Korea should concentrate its efforts on developing partisan groups in South Korea.

  • October 03, 1949

    Cable, from Stalin to the Soviet Ambassador in Beijing

    Stalin asks the ambassador to find the Minister of Foreign Affairs in Beijing and tell him that they agree with the DPRK's thinking on the feasibility of establishing diplomatic relations between the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and the People's Republic of China.

  • January 19, 1950

    Telegram Shtykov to Vyshinsky on a Luncheon at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the DPRK

    Shtykov reports a meeting with Kim Il Sung, along with Chinese and Korean delegates. Kim Il Sung expresses his view on the prospect of a liberation of the South Korean people that is to follow the Chinese success in liberation. Kim expresses his view that the South Koreans support his cause for reunification which the South Korean government does not seem to purse, and that he desires to ask Stalin for permission on an offensive action on South Korea.

  • January 30, 1950

    Telegram from Stalin to Shtykov

    Stalin asks Shtykov to relay a message to Kim Il Sung about North Korea's proposed offensive against South Korea and Soviet Union's request for lead from North Korea.

  • January 31, 1950

    Telegram from the USSR Ambassador to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to Stalin

    As a response to Stalin's willingness to talk to Kim Il Sung on the issue of offensive attack to South Korea and on Stalin's request of lead, Kim Il Sung, according to Shtykov, responded that he would like to set up a meeting with him, and that he would take necessary measures for the lead to be delivered to the Soviet Union.

  • February 07, 1950

    Telegram from Shtykov to Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Vyshinsky

    Shtykov relays to Vyshinsky Kim Il Sung's questions regarding the central committee's decision to issue a loan, on whether they can proceed toward forming more infantry, and on if North Korea could use in 1950 the credit the Soviet government had allocated for 1951. In answer to Kim Il Sung's requests, Shtykov answered ambiguously, stating that more thought needs to be put in.

  • February 09, 1950

    Telegram, from Vyshinsky to Shtykov

    Vyshinsky relays that all of the things that Kim Il Sung requested are allowed.

  • February 10, 1950

    Ciphered Telegram, Shtykov to Vyshinsky, re: Meeting with Kim Il Sung

    Telegram from Shtykov to Vyshinsky reporting the results of his meeting on the same day with Kim Il Sung.

  • March 09, 1950

    Telegram from Shtykov to Vyshinsky

    In a telegram to Shytykov which he then relays to Vyshinsky, Kim Il Sung writes that North Korea requests of the Soviet Union military and technical support. In return, North Korea is sending the natural resources such as gold and silver to Soviet Union. Kim requests that a

  • March 12, 1950

    Ciphered telegram, Vyshinsky to Soviet Ambassador in Pyongyang (Shtykov) transmitting a Message to Kim Il Sung

    Telegram from A. Vyshinsky to Soviet Ambassador in Pyongyang, Shtykov, to inform Kim Il Sung of reallocation of portion of 1951 credit (17 March 1949 agreement) to 1950.

  • March 16, 1950

    Telegram from Shtykov to Vyshinsky

    Shtykov transmits Kim Il Sung’s March 14 letter containing requests for credit in the form of arms and other military equipment.

  • March 18, 1950

    Message, Stalin to Kim Il Sung (via Shtykov)

    Stalin informs Kim Il Sung of the decision to approve of North Korean request of arms, equipment and specialist requests, per his March 4 message.

  • March 21, 1950

    Telegram from Shtykov to Vyshinski regarding meeting with Kim Il Sung

    Shtykov reports on his meeting with Kim Il Sung where Kim Il Sung requests a meeting with Stalin in Moscow.

  • March 24, 1950

    Telegram from Shtykov to Vyshinsky regarding Kim Il Sung's impending trip to Moscow

    Shtykov informs Vyshinsky of Kim Il Sung's upcoming visit and the transportation arrangements.

  • April 10, 1950

    Ciphered telegram, Soviet Representative Aleksei Ignatieff in Pyongyang to Vyshinsky

    In a discussion between Mao Zedong and Ri Ju-yeon, Mao expresses a positive attitude toward China-North Korea relations, though indicates he is unaware that Kim Il Sung was then in the Soviet Union.

  • April 25, 1950

    Telegram from Ignatiev to Vyshinsky

    Report of Kim Il Sung and Pak Heon-yeong’s safe arrival into North Korea.

  • May 13, 1950

    Cable from Roshchin to Stalin, Relaying Mao's Request for Clarification on North Korea Taking Action Against South Korea

    The telegram relays a request from Mao, conveyed via Chinese Foreign Minister Zhou Enlai, seeking Stalin’s “personal clarifications” of his stand on a potential North Korean action to reunify the country. Mao sought the information after hearing a report from Kim, who had arrived that day in the Chinese capital for a secret two-day visit and clearly claimed that he had received Stalin’s blessing.