Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

SEARCH RESULTS

  • November 14, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 12:15 p.m., Wednesday

    A conversation between Pinto and Raul Roa discussing denuclearization of Latin America and the dismantling of bases like Guantanamo. Pinto also writes that the denuclearization of Africa was an initiative of Fidel Castro in the UN in 1960, and he praised the Brazilian draft, saying that, with the Cuban amendments, it would be an effective guarantee for Latin America and an important step toward disarmament and the suspension of nuclear tests.

  • November 14, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 3:15 p.m., Wednesday

    The tight secrecy continues to surround the conversations with Anastas Mikoyan, however in a conversation with Pinto, he reveals information concerning: Fidel Castro, Cuban-Soviet relations during the crisis and Cuba's refusal to submit to international inspections.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 4:30 p.m., Friday

    Pinto analyzes Fidel Castro's decision to accept the “unilateral inspection,” when, beforehand, he always rejected inspection of this character.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Foreign Ministry to the Brazilian Delegation at the United Nations General Assembly, New York, 9 p.m., Friday

    The Brazilian delegation to the United Nations General Assembly advises the Brazilian government not to postpone the voting on the draft resolution about the denuclearization of Latin America.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Delegation at the United Nations General Assembly (Afonso Arinos), New York, 7:30 p.m., Friday

    Melo-Franco and Cuba's ambassador discuss the nuclearization of Latin America draft to the UN General Assembly.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 6:30 p.m., Friday

    Pinto discusses the current situation in Cuba and feels certain that Cuba depends more and more on Soviet economic help, but that Fidel Castro feels sure of that there will only be an overthrow due to an American invasion or by a prolonged total blockade, that will have more grave international implications.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Washington (Campos), 9 p.m., Friday

    A report from Roberto de Oliveira Campos on how certain actions and diplomatic moves during the Cuban crisis have served to inflame international tensions on both sides.

  • November 19, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Moscow (da Cunha), 6 p.m., Monday

    Da Cunha reports that the Soviet press (and government) has hidden from its readers the recent evolution of the Cuban problem/crisis.

  • November 19, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Embassy in Belgrade, 12:30 p.m., Monday

    A brief analysis of Chinese-Cuban relations during the crisis and Fidel Castro's diplomatic skills in his relations with both the United States and Soviet Union.

  • November 20, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 9:30 a.m., Tuesday

    Pinto discusses Brazilian-Cuban relations since his arrival in December, especially during the period of crisis.

  • November 20, 1962

    Brazilian Foreign Ministry Memorandum, 'Question of Cuba'

    A memorandum on the Cuban Missile Crisis covering perspectives from the three major actors: U.S., Soviet Union and Cuba.

  • December 29, 1967

    Letter, Director of the Argentinian National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) to the Foreign Minister on Nuclear Cooperation with Brazil

    The Director of the Argentinian National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) writes to the Foreign Minister on a visit by a group of Brazilian officials and the details of a possible agreement for nuclear cooperation between the two countries.

  • September 11, 1974

    Letter, Secretary-General of the National Security Council to the President of Brazil, on Nuclear Cooperation with Argentina

    Cover letter from an explanatory memorandum on a possible agreement of mutual cooperation in nuclear energy between Brazil and Argentina. Contains President Geisel's response to the opinion of the National Security Council about nuclear cooperation between Argentina and Brazil. It concludes that the solution of pending issues with Buenos Aires should come before advancing in the nuclear field.

  • June 18, 1979

    Notice No. 135/79 from the General Secretariat of the Brazilian National Security Council

    In 1978 the National Security Council identified the most important shortcoming of nuclear cooperation with Germany: the non-transfer of technology for the production of uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The lack of this crucial phase for the production of nuclear fuel led Brazil to decide to develop this method by national means, in view of the unwillingness of France and Great Britain to export said technology without a full scope of safeguards. The document reports how the government decided to create an autonomous nuclear project with regard to cooperation with Germany and free from the international safeguards regime. Coordinated by CNEN and implemented by the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN), this project represented the first phase of the “parallel” nuclear program whose objective was the autonomous mastery of the nuclear cycle.