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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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China-Southeast Asia Relations

China was a major player in Cold War Southeast Asia, advocating for socialist revolutions and directly supporting independence struggles.

  • January 30, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Vietnam, 'Phạm Ngọc Thạch Will Visit the Soviet Union and China to Discuss Cultural Cooperation'

    After a dinner for musicians visiting China, the Chinese Embassy to Vietnam reports on a future visit by Ngoc Thach to the Soviet Union.

  • February 08, 1964

    Chinese Foreign Ministry’s Summary for the Embassy of the Burmese Government’s Circumstances for 1963 and Official Directive for 1964 Plans and Projects

    The Foreign Ministry concludes that based on Burma's geopolitics importance, the Chinese government should continue to struggle for the support and neutral position of Ne Win's government.

  • February 08, 1964

    Record of Conversation from Chairman Mao Zedong's Reception of the Cambodian Ambassador to China Sisowath Sirik Matak

    Mao and Matak discuss Western imperialist collaboration with India, attempts to overthrow the Cambodian government, and the situation in Vietnam, among other topics.

  • March 31, 1964

    Record of Conversation from Chairman Mao’s Reception of the Military Delegation from the Kingdom of Cambodia

    Mao and Lon Nol discuss Chinese-Cambodian ties, Cambodia's relations with Vietnam and Thailand, and US policy in Southeast Asia.

  • June 05, 1964

    Chinese Foreign Ministry Report, 'On the Topic of Strengthening Our Work in Burma'

    Report explain that Ne Win's government is now suffering from a domestic coup and international isolation, therefore, support from China is important, which also satisfies China's national interests. Following the Premier's instructions, ambassador Geng Biao should plan a meet with Ne Win to discuss these points.

  • June 15, 1964

    Telegram number 306/10 from Lucien Paye

    Lucien Paye summarizes the views of the Yugoslavian chargé d’affaires in Beijing on China's policies toward Laos and other countries in Southeast Asia and Africa.

  • June 26, 1964

    Chinese Foreign Ministry Report, Excerpts of General Ne Win’s Internal Conversations, the Current Situation and its Solutions

    Excerpts from Ne Win's conversations with Burmese officials and criticisms of the economic situation as a result of his policies.

  • July 01, 1964

    Chinese Foreign Ministry, Request for Instructions on Supporting the Ne Win Government through Trade

    The CCP Central Committee’s instructions are to vigorously struggle for Ne Win, to support him economically and to expand the imports from Burma.

  • July 01, 1964

    Record of Zhou Enlai’s Reception and Conversation with Workers Party of Vietnam Central Committee Cadres Delegation

    Zhou Enlai and Nguyen Con discuss economic conditions in North Vietnam and China, as well as Chinese economic aid to the DRV.

  • September 28, 1964

    Discussion between Mao Zedong and Cambodian Prince Sihanouk

    Mao Zedong discusses previous and present Chinese-American relations, focusing especially on Taiwan

  • October 18, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Indonesia, 'Reactions to China's Nuclear Test'

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Indonesia describing positive responses from Indonesian government officials and foreign government officials in Indonesia regarding China's nuclear test.

  • October 19, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Indonesia, 'The Message from Premier Zhou has been handed Handed to the Indonesian officials Officials'

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Indonesia describing the planned discussion between Ambassador Yao and Subandrio regarding China's first nuclear weapons test.

  • October 20, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Vietnam, 'Reactions to China's Testing of an Atomic Bomb (6)'

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Vietnam entails positive responses of Le Duan, Pham Hùng and Ly Ban regarding China's first testing of an Atomic Bomb.

  • October 23, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Indonesia, 'Subandrio Met with Ambassador Yao for a Discussion on Nuclear Test'

    Description of a conversation between Chinese Ambassador Yao Zhongming and Indonesian Foreign Minister Subandrio. Subandrio expresses support for China's recent nuclear test, declaring that it will "contribute to world peace." Subandrio suggests a proposal that the upcoming Conference on Disarmament in Geneva invite China, along with a number of other Afro-Asian countries, which Yao responds negatively to, because this conference is convened by the United Nations.

  • October 27, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Ambassador Yao, Please Set an Appointment with Subandrio'

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry responding to a previous cable sent by Ambassador Yao Zhongming, describing a discussion with Subandrio about a recent Chinese nuclear test. The Foreign Ministry suggests that Subandrio, by suggesting a that the Conference on Disarmament in Geneva should invite China, is collaborating with "imperialists and the revisionists in their conspiracy to oppose the nuclear test in China." The Ministry asks to set up an appointment with Subandrio to clearly express China's disagreement with his suggestion, including in the cable specific answers to the previous suggestions Subandrio made to Yao.

  • October 30, 1964

    Reply from Acting President, Dr. Subandrio, to Premier Zhou Enlai

    Subandrio writes a letter to Premier Zhou Enlai, praising the idea proposed in a previous message from China about holding a summit conference on general disarmament and banning of nuclear weapons. Subandrio suggests that the conference could have a higher chance of success if the 5 nuclear states (US, USSR, UK, France, and China) met prior to the summit.

  • 1965

    Organizing Cargo to be Shipped by Air Transport from China to Burma, Cambodia, and Pakistan

    A report on organizing air routes between China and Burma, Cambodia, and Pakistan.

  • January 06, 1965

    Note No. 2/65 on Conversations with Comrade Shcherbakov about the Developmental Tendencies in the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, on 22 and 28 December 1964

    Conversation between the East German and Soviet ambassadors to Vietnam, on the Sino-Vietnamese relationship. Shcherbakov expresses his belief that China is increasingly using Vietnam as a pawn, and that, as a result, the Chinese are pushing the Vietnamese towards talks of negotiations with the United States.

  • January 27, 1965

    Record of Premier Zhou and Vice Premier Chen Yi's Third Conversation with Subandrio

    Zhou and Subandrio discuss Indonesia's withdrawal from the United Nations, non-alignment, the Soviet Union, and the Second Asian-African Conference.

  • March 14, 1965

    Chinese Foreign Ministry Report, Burmese Attitudes toward Problems in Vietnam

    Report describing how Burma has been indirectly protesting the United States' continuous air raids of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, for example through their mass media.