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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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Sino-Soviet Relations

This is a catch-all collection for sources on Sino-Soviet relations. Its contents are described in an essay by Charles Kraus, "The Sino-Soviet Alliance, 70 Years Later" (February 2020). To see focused collections that deal with specific periods of the Sino-Soviet relationship during the Cold War, see (1) Making of the Sino-Soviet Alliance, 1945-1950; (2) Sino-Soviet Alliance, 1950-1959; (3) Sino-Soviet Split, 1960-1984; (4) Sino-Soviet Border Conflict, 1969; and (5) Sino-Soviet Rapprochement, 1985-1989. (Image, Soviet propaganda poster, "Friends Forever.")

  • September 10, 1951

    Ciphered Telegram, Filippov [Stalin] to Mao Zedong

    Telegram from Stalin to Mao agreeing to send the military advisors requested by Mao. He also asks whether General Zakharov would be suitable as the main military adviser for the staff.

  • October 07, 1951

    Telegram from Filippov [Stalin] to Mao Zedong via Krasovsky

    Telegram from Stalin to Mao discussing the five advisors being sent to Beijing, and the military equipment being sent by the end of 1951 for the remaining six divisions -- the delivery of which is being delayed six months.

  • October 18, 1951

    Cable No. 25025, Mao Zedong to Filippov [Stalin]

    Mao writes to Stalin regarding an upcoming conference to discuss strategy for an armistice ending the Korean War.

  • November 01, 1951

    Ciphered Telegram No. 25465 from Beijing, Mao Zedong to Cde. Filippov [Stalin]

    Mao writes to Stalin discussing strategies for a proposal cease hostilities at the front line, and establish a line of demarcation between the two sides.

  • November 14, 1951

    Ciphered Telegram No. 25902 from Beijing, Mao Zedong to Cde. Filippov [Stalin]

    Mao writes to Stalin of the ongoing armistice negotiations concerning Korea, specifically the proposed demarcation line (38th parallel). Mao also writes about monitoring, the exchange of prisoners of war, and economic considerations within China.

  • November 19, 1951

    Ciphered Telegram, Special No. 1821 from Beijing

    Telegram from Roshchin to Moscow after meeting Zhou Enlai who asked him to request of Stalin an answer to Mao's earlier inquiry on the negotiations in Korea.

  • November 21, 1951

    Ciphered Telegram No. 26044, Gromyko to Razuvaev

    Telegram from Gromyko to Razuvaev instructing him to explain to the Chinese and Koreans the reasoning behind Vyshinsky's demand that the demarcation line be established at the 38th parallel rather than at the present front line.

  • January 18, 1952

    Memorandum of Conversation, Soviet Ambassador to China N.V. Roshchin with Chinese Minister of Public Security Luo Ruiqing, 24 December 1951

    In the course of the discussion the matter of the proposed purge by the Chinese government of foreigners in Manchuria was raised. Luo Ruiqing said that the Chinese government intends to purge a series of regions of the country of unreliable elements: Manchuria, Qingdao, and Beijing. In the course of two years from these regions all foreigners of imperialist states will be deported. It’s more difficult to address the matter of local Soviet citizens. Among these local Soviet citizens there are dispersed columns of openly and secretly hostile elements, who have conducted in the past or carry on now espionage activities against the USSR and the Chinese People’s Republic.

  • January 31, 1952

    Ciphered Telegram No. 16008 from Beijing, Mao Zedong to Cde. Filippov [Stalin]

    Mao asks Stalin advice and instructions concerning issues raised during negotiations, particularly the establishment of a monitoring organ comprised of officials from neutral countries.

  • February 03, 1952

    Ciphered Telegram No. 709, Filippov [Stalin] to Krasovsky, for Mao Zedong

    Telegram to Mao from Stalin approving of Mao's progress at the armistice talks and reminding him to have Polish and Czech included in the commission of observers.

  • February 08, 1952

    Ciphered Telegram No. 16293 from Beijing, Mao Zedong to Filippov [Stalin]

    Mao conveys two telegrams to Stalin: one from Peng Dehuai to Mao (22 January 1952) and the other is Mao’s response (4 February 1952). The telegrams discuss North Korea’s need for aid from China.

  • February 21, 1952

    Ciphered Telegram No. 16715 from Beijing, Mao Zedong to Filippov [Stalin]

    Mao Zedong requests help from Stalin regarding the dropping of insects on North Korea by the United States.

  • March 07, 1952

    Cable, Zhou Enlai to Filippov [Stalin]

    Zhou Enlai's request to Stalin to increase its assistance by dispatching anti-epidemiological specialists.

  • March 10, 1952

    Ciphered Telegram No. 17318 from Beijing, Zhou Enlai to Filippov [Stalin]

    Zhou Enlai's request to Stalin to supply more anti-epidemiological aid to China.

  • March 14, 1952

    Cable, Filippov [Stalin] to Zhou Enlai

    Stalin replies to China's request for specialists, medication, and vaccinations.

  • July 16, 1952

    Ciphered Telegram No. 4018 from Filippov [Stalin] to Mao Zedong via Krasovsky

    Stalin agrees with Mao's position on repatriation and says Kim Il Sung agrees as well.

  • July 18, 1952

    Ciphered Telegram No. 21646 from Mao Zedong to Filippov [Stalin] conveying 15 July 1952 telegram from Mao to Kim Il Sung and 16 July 1952 reply from Kim to Mao

    A two-part telegram from Mao to Stalin forwarding to the latter, an exchange which occurred between him and Kim Il Sung.

  • July 26, 1952

    Cable, Zhou Enlai to the Chairman [Mao Zedong] and Comrades Liu [Shaoqi], Zhu [De], Peng [Dehuai], [Li] Fuchun, and Su Yu

    Zhou Enlai shares a draft telegram with Mao Zedong.

  • July 27, 1952

    Letter, Mao Zedong to Comrade Filippov [Stalin]

    Mao Zedong briefs Stalin on the proposed itinerary of a delegation to Moscow led by Zhou Enlai.

  • August 18, 1952

    Report, Zhou Enlai to Chairman Mao [Zedong] and the Central Committee

    Zhou reports on the initial plans for his visit to Moscow and some of the conversations he's held concerning the Korean War.